Problems with neighbor's dog: advice needed

Italy
February 12, 2007 1:56pm CST
Our neighbors have a smallish dog - it looks like a miniature lassie - it is at least 2 or 3 years old. They live across the street and down a few house from us on a corner lot. We walk our dog twice a day, every day, for about an hour. We always walk by that house as it leads to a larger area in our neighborhood where there are many different streets to walk down. Our neighbors do not have a fence. And they will have their dog out in the yard out without a leash. Anytime their dog is out when we walk by, their dog hoes absolutely nuts. Starts barking and growling like crazy. If the owners are not right next to him, he will come out into the street charging at our dog - but he has always stopped about 2 o 3 feet away - Our dog is very calm around all the other dogs, unless one of the dogs is barking excessively right next to him. Our dog never barks at other dogs in the neighborhood when we walk by them. If our neighbors dog didn't do anything, out dog would just happily walk right on by. We don't know these neighbors at all. I don't feel that they should have their dog out in the yard without a leash, especially given his behavior around other dogs. What is the best way to approach the neighbors in a non-confrontational, non-threatening way ? Part of me wants to walk over there and tell them to put their freaking dog on a leash. Part of me wants to just call animal control and tell them there is a dog in the neighborhood without a leash. But I know both of these approaches will lead to bad blood. Something I want to avoid. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
4 people like this
8 responses
@nana1944 (1367)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I would try talking to them first about the leash laws. If there is one. I found something that will generally keep a dog for running at you. Wear a cap, like a baseball cap. When the dog runs out at you, jerk the cap off your head and throw it at them. They generally will run. I would explain to the neighbors what I was going to do. There would be no harm to the dog.
3 people like this
@Darkwing (21588)
12 Feb 07
How about approaching this softly softly? Take your dog with you, and knock on their door, preferably when their own dog is not in the yard. Upon their answering the door, say something like, "Hi, I thought I might bring my dog around to get to know your dog, as he seems to be distressed each time we pass, taking our dog for a walk." Maybe they will take this as a friendly gesture, and maybe they won't but it's probably your best shot. If they're adamant that they don't want that to happen, then perhaps ask if he mightn't be happier about people and dogs passing, if they were out of his view, behind a fence or something. If all fails, and you don't think you're going to get anywhere, you can go to the dog control people with a clear conscience that you have done your best, and all you can to resolve the situation amicably. The rest is up to the dog's owners. They must realise that it's barking constantly. I hope you get to work this out with your neighbours with the minimum of fuss. Brightest Blessings.
3 people like this
• United States
12 Feb 07
check and see if your town/county has a leash law, then perhaps you can talk to the neighbors first, very friendly like and explain that their dog is barking and acting aggressive when you go on walks, and you worry that he may one day bite, or could even be hit with a car-see if they are receptive to your talk, if they dont respond neighborly- I would call your authorities if there is leash law or animal control- they dont realize that if he bites someone, they are responsible and then they face fines, and medical bills,not to mention the dog being euthanized. I have 2 dogs and when they arent in the fenced in area, they are on a leash and are never out where they can scare/cause others fear-they are actually big babies! Good luck! Let me know how it goes!
3 people like this
@Bee1955 (3886)
• United States
13 Feb 07
No, your first instinct is correct. Go over, introduce yourself and talk about their dog -- the possibility it might get hit by a car, how it runs into the street as you all walk by, etc. Do it in a concerned, non-threatening manner. Offer a an extra lead or leash as if they dont have one. You'll be surprized that honey gathers more flies than vinegar.
1 person likes this
@kgwat70 (13396)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I certainly can understand your concern but I think first you should try and talk to the owners to see if they will cooperate and make sure the dog is fenced in or on a leash. If you explain your concerns they may listen to you and do the right thing and make sure the dog is not roaming around unattended. If they do not cooperate then I would call animal control and let them know about the loose dog. Dog owners are supposed to have the yard fenced in or have a leash for the dog if they let it go outside unattended.
@onabreak2 (1161)
• United States
13 Feb 07
I wouldnt walk that way until you get the problem resolved. You are going to have to get the authorities involved if the neighbors dont do something about it,. First I would talk to them though and give them a chance to do what is right.
@adnanmd2 (830)
13 Feb 07
I guess you go and talk to them about it..
@blueskies (1186)
• United States
13 Feb 07
We have two shelties (sounds like the breed you have encountered is a sheltie). They can be very protective of their owner's property. What he is doing is chasing your dog off of his property. He charges, you walk off, he's won. He gets a reward each time he does this. You need either approach his owners about his behavior or call animal control. If it were me, I would call animal control. They will fine the owner. That is usually enough motivation for them to keep the dog in the house or on a chain the future. You can usually make an anonymous call, so they won't know it was you that turned them in. If you confront the owner and they refuse to cooperate, you are then left with the choice of continuing to encounter this aggressive dog on your walks or calling animal control--but at that point, they will know it was you that called. Good luck, I hope you're able to get this sorted out soon.