Karma??? If a bank teller gave you back too much change, would you return it?

@ladyluna (7004)
United States
February 17, 2007 6:50am CST
Or if a cashier gave you back more change than you were due, would you let the teller or cashier know? Would you keep the money, or return it? What if a cashier neglected to ring up one of your items? Would you let them know, or not? Is it your good Karma if they make a mistake? Or, is it better Karma to be honest and square it?
10 people like this
14 responses
• United States
18 Feb 07
Yes, I would. I am that type of person. I have done that several times actually, where there was a mistake, and then I have told them that I owe them, or they didn't ring something up, etc. It is against us, and our own self, to be deceitful. I do believe that what goes around will come around, and also that we should have morals so that we may be better people and make this world somewhere decent to live. However, that is not always the case. I know firsthand of people walking away with more than their due, because I have worked in retail and serivces, and it seems people are always looking for a quick buck. Not only that, they do not care that their decisions have numerous effects. It is not for me to judge or say, as long as I am doing what I believe is just, then, I do not have say in the lives of those that do such things, because I am not able to speak freely, of my disdain for their lack of character.
@limitup (326)
• United States
4 Mar 07
There are many interesting points here. I believe that everything we experience, every motion, every occurence, every encounter, every person we meet, every impression we get, just everything, is a result of the make up of our thoughts and beliefs combined with what we are looking for. From a scientific or technical point of view, over-changing is probably an accumulation of countless numbers of factors, some of which may include industry, attitude of employee/manager, education of cashier, state of alertness (attention to the present moment), the hour of day/amount of business, texture/stickiness of the bills/coins, employee pay, background, beliefs, etc. I like to attack this from an intention point of view. True intention always equals results. There is a visible or hidden intention to becoming over-changed. Maybe it's an intention to prove our virtues to ourselves. Maybe it's an intention to help others who need help. Maybe it's an intention to improve your theft deterrent skills. It can be anything. I notice things like that too. It's pretty amazing. I love the fact that we can align our intentions to change our circumstances at any time. For example, if you suddenly had the intention to prove to yourself that all businesses were corrupt and that everybody is looking to steal from you, you will become a person who always seems to get under-changed. You will somehow find yourself in a thieving industry, without sticky bills, in a poor unfocused attitude, etc. without even being aware of the factors and forces working against you. The detailed nitty-gritty of this is fascinating but it's so complex and on so many levels that I don't understand a lot of it at all. It definitely is real though and I am in awe of it. I love the quote: "One way or another, everybody gets what they want."
2 people like this
• United States
20 Feb 07
Perhaps, that could be the plan. We may never know, until it was meant for us to know, but everyone does have a plan and a goal and a life that they are destined to live, so that will be interesting to see where it takes them. However, we may only know the occurrences of those around us.
3 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
18 Feb 07
Good morning WesterValleyGirl, Outstanding rebuke of thievery! Back in the 80's, I took a job as a Retail Mgmt Trainee. Halfway through the training program, the Regional Mgr. noticed that I had a knack for 'shrink prevention', i.e. theft deterrence. I was promoted to further develop that knack for deterrence. Having said that, I (like you) have seen the shocking statistics of theft, understand its rippling effect, and concur with your perspective whole-heartedly. This scenario (too much change) happens to my husband & I quite often. So much so, that we've discussed the possible meaning behind the frequent occurrences. Is it just employee incompetence? Or, is there something more going on, like the members of our society need to slow down, and/or focus more on the moment? Is our moral fortitude being tested? If so, why with regularity? Is it a personal test, or are we pawns in a bigger picture? Although I believe man has a will to direct his own destiny, I also tend to believe in the Bigger Picture; that there is a Divine Plan. If my views are accurate, could it be that these minor overages and shortings are part of that Master Plan? And if so, are they designed to strengthen our moral foundation, or are we interferring with the plan? One aspect that hubby & I have discussed is: What if the teller or cashier is destined for greater things, but remains at the job for reasons of fear? What if the Master Plan involves a big Universal nudge (i.e. getting fired or quitting for having to personally make restitution for the error) to get the teller on a different path? I have only been fired once in my life, not for anything unscrupulous -- a personality conflict w/my superior. And although it was a blow to my ego at the time, it was very fortuitous. Being forced to actively pursue other options led me on a much better path. Could it be that employee oversight is also part of the plan?
3 people like this
@limitup (326)
• United States
4 Mar 07
Always return the money. Never even let it cross your mind to take it. "What goes around comes around" is very true. Since the quality of our thoughts determines what we get out of life, when we hold onto thoughts of theft, whether they are in taking or receiving, the theft process will always be in our lives. A person who thinks about crime, watches crime shows, is constantly afraid of criminal activities, thinks about conning others, thinks about being conned, etc. will be much more likely to be stolen from in his/her life. It is the law of attraction and the law of attraction is accurate. This is good karma, as you state.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
4 Mar 07
Hi Limitup, Sounds like your relative has a very tedious life-lesson to learn about trust and benevolence. Oh, and don't get me started about 'drama hogs'. Ugghhh!!! They're like magnets to every annoyance, large and small. What I mean about the frequency is: In an earlier post (in this same discussion) I explained that this phemonena of getting back too much change happens to my husband and I ALOT. Well, it's not just too much change, often it's that a cashier forgot to charge for an item, or undercharges. Anyway, hubby and I have had discussions about what this could possibly mean. If you read the earlier post (sorry, it's kina' long) you'll get a better idea of what I'm talking about. I suspect you'll have some interesting thoughts about it. Toodles!
3 people like this
@limitup (326)
• United States
4 Mar 07
Oh, too much change ($). I thought you meant too much change! Ha ha. Yes that is interesting. I didn't see that one. I'll post up there. As for that relative, yes he's got some lessons to learn. Sadly, if his strong trend of current thought persists, I don't think he will ever confront them in this lifetime. While I know that nobody is ever too far gone to apply what we're talking about, I doubt he will ever seek to change in this way unless he's on his deathbed. He takes extremely strong medications and over-eats to deal with his thoughts. It should make me sad perhaps, but I am the constant optimist. He is a really great guy and I know he will eventually see these things one way or the other. He will be in good hands.
2 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
4 Mar 07
Good morning Limitup, Thanks for you input on this topic. A dear friend of mine, who is now divorced from her vexing force, had her home robbed three times in one year while married to her ex. He turned out to be a real con man. Always looking for a way 'to get over' on people. I tried to tell her then that his vexing ways were what was drawing negativity into her life. Once she got rid of him, she's drawn only goodness into her life. I will add that she is a true 'point of light', who now lives the happy life she deserves. This little story exemplifies your point very well. And, I concur with your perspective whole-heartedly. Yet, two questions remain: What's behind the frequent occurence of too much change? And is it part of a greater life lesson? Any thoughts?
3 people like this
@anonymili (3141)
17 Feb 07
I don't believe in that kind of karma, if someone makes a mistake like that I'd be decent enough to hand the money back. I know books get balanced and if the person was accountable for that money they might have to pay it out of their own pocket or in extreme cases they might lose their job. I would rather not be responsible for that. But I would point out their mistake as I handed the money back in the hope that they would be more careful. As they say "what goes around, comes around" - if you don't return the excess money when someone makes that mistake with you, one of these days it will be the other way around and you will make a similar mistake and it will be with someone dishonest who will keep the money too...
2 people like this
• United States
20 Feb 07
Lady, I would have to say, that even though we might be "previously slighted," I believe that our good fortune would come in a manner, that did not leave doubt on the conscience, about whether or not it was a positive thing. So, that is my point of view.
2 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
17 Feb 07
Anonymili, Good points! But, what if the error was the 'turn around'? Meaning that it was the Universe's way of rewarding you for a time when you were previously 'slighted' in some way?
• Philippines
15 Mar 07
Honesty is the best policy! We should understand that everything we do has something in return... If its bad or good..We dont really know.. Just do good to get good things back!
2 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
23 Mar 07
Very good point Vashstanpede992000. It sounds as though you genuinely trust 'the process'.
2 people like this
@SilPhil (267)
• Australia
11 Mar 07
I would always go back. Recently I was doing my grocery shopping, and whn I paid (by EFTPOS) got some cash out of my account. I asked for $120. The guy who served me gave me that full amount, but when I looked at the receipt, I saw he had only processed $20 on the receipt. So I went to the customer service desk and let them know. It would have been very easy for me to walk off with the money. Our financial situation isn't the best at the moment, and we could really use the good fortune. However, I thought of the fact that he would reconcile his till and be $100 down. Maybe he would be accused of stealing that money, possibly even lose his job. I didn't want to be responsible for that, the only responsible thing to do was return the money. So I did. We went to the car and unloaded the shopping, when the manager ran after me. To thank me for being so honest, they gave me a beautiful bunch of flowers. No where near the amount I had just returned, but it was still a fantastic gesture, and a wonderful way for them to say thank you. Things like that make me more inclined to do the right thing in the future.
2 people like this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
11 Mar 07
Hi SilPhil, Thanks for sharing this story. I'm sure the immediate recognition was quite helpful. It was the right thing for you to return the $, and it was also the right thing for the manager to recognize your effort to protect the store bank. Another fine example of: One good turn triggering another! Would that it could be that more people truly understood that kindness and goodness is contagious.
2 people like this
• Grand Junction, Colorado
7 Mar 07
I do believe in Karma, what comes around goes around. I have only had it happen once at the bank where the teller tried to give me $20, more than I was trying to withdrawal and immediately counted it back to her and handed it back. Number one it's the right thing to do, number 2 a bank teller is one of those jobs that to many errors like that and you will loose your job. It's not like a cashier at a lot of places where overages and underages happen regularly. I know that few places seem to actually take disciplinary action, at least that has been my experience. On to the retailers, I can't tell you how many times a cashier makes a mistake both in my favor and not to my favor, partly because I truly believe that they don't care and second they can't count with out a calculator. It's sad that when you hand some one bills and after they have quickly rang that in and you hand them change they go into panic mode especially when it's not the exact change but now your expecting a nickel back. When you try to explain they look at you with this blank look on their face. Forgive me as I go off topic here. Yes I always point out the error often times, to the I could care less attitude that I gave you to much, or that I didn't ring it up. I look at it this way while I'm an honest person I am that way because of my up bringing, that 2 wrongs don't make a right, and that every time someone takes something not belonging to them it ultimately affects me. Such as higher costs at the store, higher insurance rates because of the people who cheat their insurance and the list goes on and on. People should be honest at all costs, and those that aren't shame on you!! As always this just my 2 cents worth! :)
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
7 Mar 07
Good morning Beaniefanatic13, Thanks for chiming in on this topic. As you can see from the above, 'off-topic' is the rule, rather than the exception here. Your perspective is highly honorable. And, your points are valid. I've seen that doe-in-the-headlights looked from a cashier or two when you add coin to get back a single coin. Like adding .12 to get back the quarter. Funny that you should quote my Mother's favorite quote "Two wrongs don't make a right". Your folks must be (or were) brought up in the old school, like my own. In this case, your .02 adds up to a big gold star!
2 people like this
@design (848)
• Ireland
7 Mar 07
I beleive in Karma, What comes around goes around ! If I got extra money from a cashier in a bank or at a shop I'd live it back, I tend to pay more attention in a shop as mistakes are made numerous times a day.
2 people like this
• Singapore
27 Mar 07
I don't believe in this kind of Karma. I would treat it as the cashier's carelessness. I will keep it in my pocket and silently walk off.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
11 Apr 07
Hi Titaniumsoul, Your perspective, though somewhat harsh, is perhaps the perspective that will most drive the human race to complete 'self responsibility'. I cannot tell you how frustating it is to hear repeated excuses for why "I did this"... or why "I did that". "It was the school's failure", or "it was society's failure". In the end, I believe that you are right in demanding higher expectations from all. In the case scenario that you present, I would also dismiss the employee, if it was more than the first time. The more we lower expectations, the lower the result will be. I do not agree that greed should be the motivator, rather it should be the expectation that we should be all that we can be. Very good point Titaniumsoul! Thank you for sharing this perspective.
2 people like this
• Singapore
11 Apr 07
Hi Ladyluna, If I run a business and the cashier gave extra change to customers and they walked away just like that, I will be terribily disappointed with the cashier. Perhaps, I may fire the cashier. In addition, I do not expect customers to return the overpayment because in my country, everybody is greed over money. The reason why I do not believe in this Karma is because it is the responsibility of the cashier to give exact change fast. If the cashier is unable to do so, he/she has to quit.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
27 Mar 07
Hi Titaniumsoul, Because no one answer is correct given the unknown circumstances, I'm not going to judge your response. However, I wonder if the shoe were on the other foot, would you prefer that your customer returned the overpayment? If you owned the business would you consider the careless overpayment into your loss ratio, or would you rely on people's honesty? Also, I wonder ... you said that you don't believe in this kind of Karma. Do you have a different perspective on this? Thanks, -Ladyluna
1 person likes this
• Nigeria
24 Apr 07
well i do not think that is a case of karma cause you didnt plan to steal any money but it was a mistake by the cashier and you have the option of either returning it or taking it.I would definately let them no about it cause i wouldnt wanna let my guilty conscience kill me
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
24 Apr 07
Thanks for your input Fellowlife. You're right about a guilty conscience being a heavy weight to bear.
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@miamilady (4925)
• United States
20 Apr 07
This may be a horrible thing to say, but it would depend on what's going on in my day and how quickly I noticed it. If it was something I noticed right away I'd point it out to the cashier. Recently I was in a rush and as I was going out the door it occured to me that I may not have been charged for something. I was running late and I noticed as I was walking out the door. I think I was having a hectic day all around and I just made the decision that I didn't have time to go back. I may have kept money in one other instance where I got back to much change. More often than not, I give the money back. It's happened to me a few times. As far as karma goes. I'm not sure what I believe about that anymore. I used to be a big believer in that. I still believe it's important to be a good person and to treat other well, but I know a few people who go through life thinking that getting ahead is all that matters and being nice isn't important. I've seen those people prosper and go through life with no regrets. So, I'm not sure on the karma thing. Again, I still think it's important to treat others as you'd want to be treated.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
20 Apr 07
Hello Miamilady, Far be it from me to argue your "Golden Rule" point. Wise, wise words! As for not knowing about getting back too much change until you're long away from the store, yup -- been there, done that. I wouldn't drive 90 miles out of my way to go back to the store but, I'd try to right the wrong when I got back into town. Especially if it's a store that I regularly frequent. Thanks for sharing your perspective on this issue.
1 person likes this
@ainee82 (618)
• Philippines
17 Apr 07
I would return it. Anything that is not mine and I know who I got it from i will return it right away. I believe that whatever you do wrong will come back to you.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
17 Apr 07
Hello Ainee82, I tend to agree with you that what goes around does find it's way back around. I may test the waters, I may test the recipe, but I sure don't want to test fate, destiny or karma. It's best to recognize when one is outmatched.
1 person likes this
@sigma77 (5385)
• United States
9 Apr 07
I don't know if it is related to karma, but I would give back the extra. But sometimes, you might be overcharged and not go back to get a refund. So it might even out in the long run anyway.
1 person likes this
• India
27 Mar 07
To be very frank I did what u are discussing over here.....sometimes i got more maney back that i should at the shop......some times the petrol pump attendant for to charge me ....but ....every time what i did was went back to them and paid them back whatthey gave me extra....but but but.......whenever i gave some money extra to some one no one returned me.....and have been cheated many a times.....so i think this path of karma is not good in these days when every body thinks of how to cheat others....coz today there is not place for a honest person......such a perso is cheated by the people on each and every step of life............
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
27 Mar 07
Good morning Prashantbhargav, I'm terribly sorry to hear that you've been cheated many times. When that happens it is very troubling. You also bring up another very good point. Perhaps we, as consumers also need to be more aware in our day to day dealings, so that we don't overpay. It's easy to get caught up in our busy lives, and not focus our attention on the details. The good news is: At least in this little thread, it seems that the majority of people are honest. So, if you overpayed any of these good folks, they'd probably return the overpayment.
1 person likes this
@Suze05 (481)
• United States
27 Mar 07
I would give the money back if someone gave me too much change. I know that cashiers in stores and banks will usually have to pay back their shortages..or they may get fired. If I notice they forgot to ring something up, I will tell them too, even though they may not get in trouble for it, because the store won't know if it got rung up or not, unless it gets caught by the sensors going out of the store, but I would feel guilty about taking something I know I didn't pay for. But..if I didn't notice they didnt charge me for something until after i got home, I'm not such a saint that I would return it to the store to pay for it..first, because the girl may get in trouble for letting me out without paying for the item, plus my laziness far outweighs my conscience. LOL I think its better to be honest and fair no matter whose karma it is.
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
27 Mar 07
Good morning Suze05, Your compassion for your fellow human being is admirable, indeed. You also bring up another good point. Perhaps returning to the store the next day would bring the original cashier a double whammy. Or, it might implicate the greeter at the door whose job it is to check the receipt against the items purchased. Or perhaps store security if there was an electronic device on the item that failed to go off. Hmmm ... you've provided even more food for thought. Is Karma in play ONLY if a convergence of circumstance leads to the outcome, as opposed to one single persons mistake? Good job Suze05!
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