Does it make you crazy when people axe a question??

@Debs_place (10524)
United States
May 23, 2007 8:15pm CST
No this was not a typo. We all know the word is ask? That is the word 'as' with a 'k' sound at the end of it. Yet so many people say 'ax' or 'axe' a question. It makes me want to scream. And I am not talking about people from another country. I am talking about people born and raised all over the good old USA. How do you feel about this or have you not noticed it? Listen for it for a few days then get back with me and let me know.
18 people like this
35 responses
@villageanne (8554)
• United States
24 May 07
LOL I dont have to observe and get back to you. LOL I know they do. I live in an area that uses "hillbilly slang" I try hard to always correct myself when I find myself saying these words. It is so easy to pick up on language when you are around it on a regular basis. LOL
4 people like this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
That I understand, you end up saying what you hear, but it is amazing how people can hear the same words on the TV, pronounced correctly and they don't hear the difference. As you say, you try to correct yourself, it is amazing how many people just don't care.
4 people like this
• United States
24 May 07
I dont mean to run anyone or the way they speak down in any way but I have found that many who talk like this are not well educated. It seems that the more education one has the better their language skills are.
4 people like this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
I have heard this in college educated people. I think it has nothing to do with education, but laziness.
1 person likes this
@jillhill (37379)
• United States
24 May 07
I am in the public alot and hear the same thing. There are also other words that people mispronounce that drive me crazy. Like breakfast....breafus.....that's how it sounds sometime. Or Naked...they forget the "K".....!
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
It is amazing how people do this, I am glad you pointed these out to me, now I will be more aware of them in my own speech.
2 people like this
@jillhill (37379)
• United States
24 May 07
Yes....I wonder if it's because they are lazy or just can't pronounce them.
3 people like this
@ZenDove (698)
• United States
24 May 07
Oh, my goodness, yes! The lazy American tongue! Part of the problem is that we don't read enough and another part of the problem is that we don't bother to study other languages. Reading exposes you to familiar and expanded vocabularies and studying languages helps you to understand the development of language and grammar. We, Americans, are even inhibited in our appreciation of music, which could inspire an awareness of the rhythm and meter of language. If you see a word spelled correctly, and you understand the music of phonics, correct pronounciation is a simple matter. Read, America! It's like fingernails on a chalkboard when people dangle participles ("where's the store at?") or say 'breffus' instead of 'breakfast' or when they use the non- word 'irregardless'. What is that supposed to mean, anyway? 'Not-not-regard-not'? It's NOT a real word, people! There is a phrase that people use incorrectly all the time that creeps me out-"I want to have my cake and eat it, too." So, what's difficult about that? Go ahead, have your cake and eat it. If you were trying to imply irony or difficulty the phrase should be "Eat my cake and have it, too." I want to EAT my cake and still have it. Errgh.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
Oh yes, I forgot about irregardless and yes, people often learn to speak incorrectly from childhood but that does not mean that it should continue all of their lives. When you learn you are saying something a word wrong, it would seem that you would want to improve yourself by saying the word properly. I feel comfort in knowing I am not alone. I hope your BP is back down. It sounds like I hit a sore spot here.
2 people like this
• United States
24 May 07
I know my lot frowns on one word answers but all I can say to your post is a big AMEN!
2 people like this
• United States
24 May 07
I agree revdauphinee! I had to learn to pronounce words correctly, it really irritates me when a grown adult uses incorrect grammar for the simplest of words.
2 people like this
• United States
24 May 07
and i dont feel it is they dont know the correct pronounciation it to me is they are just to lazy to say it right!
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
I didn't think this post had religious significance but it is unfortunate that people don't care enough about their native language to speak it correctly.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 May 07
Allow me to ax you a question. Are you aware of what group of people says this? Well, I am. I hear it at work all the time. One individual said, "I've been sayun 'ax' from the very beginnin' of speech. I caint hep it." I said, "My mother said-as I was growing up-and still says WORSH for wash. When I was in First Grade I matched the letters to the sound I was hearing and it didn't match. It's WASH. Therefore, I don't say 'worsh' EVER. People who speak in the slang of their environment are lazy speakers and I'd prefer not to discuss anything with them. They sound ignorant. If that's what they want to sound like, then let them be who they are. Deb-good post by the way.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
I don't think there is a specific group of people that speak like this, I think it affects everyone. I had a roommate, who had idears and we opened winders. It had nothing to do with education, it was the part of the country she was from. One day someone pointed it out to her, she made an effort to not say these words incorrectly. She wanted to better herself.
1 person likes this
• United States
24 May 07
Well, it is generally people from the South. I lived there and I know fer shur.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 May 07
Carly not all people in the south have poor grammer, but several do use slang for words instead of proper english.
@GardenGerty (115095)
• United States
24 May 07
I work with lots of kids with learning disabilities. Reading is challenging for many of them, and they do have a hard time putting on those final consonants. After awhile, though, it is just laziness. It is just too bad that we cannot do to those adults that "axe" questions, what I get to do with those kids. That is, I get to correct them, then make them go back and do it all again. People repeat what they hear at home. I guess they learn it some other places, as well. When I took Latin, years ago, I was told that people who speak English are very lazy with their speech, and that is why it is so difficult for others to learn.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
24 May 07
MY son was one of the ones that was LD and he did have a hard time with those ending sounds when speaking, he did not really begin to read until he was in 6th grade, but he never axed a question, his hearing was perfectly fine. As are most people who axe questions. You are right, they are being lazy.
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (115095)
• United States
24 May 07
Did anyone point out to you and him that LD means LEARNS DIFFERENTLY,(as well as learning disabled) at one time people thought it was a lack of learning ability, actually many students with LD are highly intelligent, that is how they survive. I am glad he learned to read. Did they also give him auditory adaptations?
1 person likes this
• United States
25 May 07
I do correct anyone I hear saying "axe". Can't help it. It just isn't right.
1 person likes this
@bkfuels (1605)
• Canada
24 May 07
Ax and wood - The word is ask people not axe!!
This is something that has bothered me for years, I have actually not noticed it here on the internet but when I watch T.V. especially talk shows people say this all the time.I think it is part of the hip hop culture but I find it very annoying. An axe is something you use to chop up wood not for a question. PEOPLE THE WORD IS ASK!!!!!!!!! Thank you for the dissuasion . this is one of my pet peeves also.
@AmbiePam (51159)
• United States
24 May 07
You said it well. It's almost if you want to be cool, you have to be gramatically incorrect. : (
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Do you really think it is hip hop or just laziness? I have heard 'axe' for a long time and now I think it is just becoming more 'popular' or maybe it is becomine cool. I think it is shows a lack of respect for the listener, it tells them that I am not worth proper English!
@lecanis (16664)
• Murfreesboro, Tennessee
24 May 07
When someone throws an axe at me, I dodge. *giggles* Seriously, I have been known to ignore people who talk like this. If you made it out of elementary school and are a native English speaker, you should be able to say "ask". Come to think of it, if you can't say "ask", you probably shouldn't have made it past first grade or so. I can allow some amount of bad grammar, and I'm even guilty of it myself. However, this amount of messing up the language just to do so i just annoying.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Do you tell people why you are ignoring them? What is their reaction? You are right, if got out of 1st grade, you should be able to say ask. And I agree, no one at least to my knowledge speaks perfect English, and if I say or write things wrong, i would rather someone told me, so that I can improve myself and not look uneducated.
1 person likes this
@lecanis (16664)
• Murfreesboro, Tennessee
25 May 07
I do tell people, the first couple of times, that if they want my attention they must at least attempt proper English. I don't mind when people can't do better, only when they can and refuse. Usually they get all huffy when I say it, but afterwards they either straighten up or I ignore them. I sound very rude, I suppose.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
26 May 07
Not rude...but you have standards and if people are capable they should try and rise to them.
@crazynurse (7489)
• United States
24 May 07
Oh yes! There are also many other improper enunciations that irritate me too! Also, in my area of the country, the improper conjugation of verbs (not by foreigners who are native English speakers either!) For instance, almost everyone here, if they are going to assist a person with taking a bath, say, "I'm going to BATH her." The correct statement is, "I am going to BATHE her." This makes my skin crawl!!! They also say, "I knowed" instead of "I knew", "I seed" instead of "I saw".....so many things like that. Hubby, my children and I just cringe.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
You are so right about those, now here is my question, if your superior used this kind of grammar, would you comment about it or just continue to let them look like fools?
• United States
25 May 07
Wow, I know that I do have one fellow professor that says these things becasue the rest of us just exchange glances. We also did not hire a potential candidate because of her mispronunciation of words. As for a superior, thankfully I have not had to deal with that situation as the Department Chair, Dean or President of the college speak that way! Of course, none of them are native to here either! If it were a superior, I suppose I would not say anthing. Actually, I do not say anything to my students or anyone as I would be fighting a losing battle. It is ubiquitous here.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
That is so sad, that type of speech will reflect on every prof and the school itself. One wold think that at least in passing someone would mention the reasons a candidate wasn't hired and try to make it as specific as possible so the the offending person might realize and correct their speech.
@Flight84 (3050)
• United States
24 May 07
LOL...I'm from the South and that's all I hear. It makes me want to scream.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Well, I am from the North and I feel the same way, I wonder if there are certain areas where it is worse then others?
@Flight84 (3050)
• United States
25 May 07
I don't know. I've not been to many other states outside the Southern area. I have a Southern drawl, but mine is not quite as bad as some people have. 'Axe' is one word that really gets me though. I catch myself saying crazy stuff too, I guess I don't have too much room to talk.=)
@Ravenladyj (22936)
• United States
24 May 07
O!M!G!!! that drives me NUTS!!! and ya knwo I have to tell you it is more common here in the U.S..it used to drive me batty when I was still living in Canada and I'd here it on talk shows or whatever but then I moved here to N.Y and WOW....LOL I dont know how many times I've gone off on a rant over that! LOL
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
I don't think I ever heard anyone axe a question in Canada and I guess I don't hear it on talk shows because I don't watch talk shows but I still get to hear it more then enough. It is too bad that so few care about what is happening to the English language.
@Ravenladyj (22936)
• United States
14 Jun 07
oh no no..you dont hear ppl in canada pronounce it like that..I meant when I'd watch U.S talk shows while still living in Canada..sorry I should have made that clear LOL
• United States
24 May 07
I laughed until I thought I would pee my pants! I have noticed it most of my life. Not that I say it, but I know a lot of people who do. How funny.
@maryannemax (12170)
• Sweden
24 May 07
well, i admit that i mipronounce ask as axe, too as a joke but only to people i am really close to. but to people i am not, i always try to pronounce the words well. just amazes me that some people are already too bound and used to mispronouncing words.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
You were doing it in fun, not as a normal speech pattern. The problem is that these people believe they are right and don't hear the difference.
@Willowlady (10666)
• United States
24 May 07
You know the word Ain't is in the dictionary now don't you. That would be the signal that our country has lessened the value of speaking well. English is being threatened also. I would hope we could encourage others to speak in a better and more civilized manner. Good luck in your observations in the future.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Yes, I know about ain't...but I see that as more of a kid thing. I don't remember hearing an adult use the word ain't. If ain't isn't in the dictionary, is it really a word? I think what bothers me is that people can spell ask, it is a short word, but they can't say it and they just don't care.
@Willowlady (10666)
• United States
25 May 07
Ain't is in the dictionary and they make a big todo about adding the handful every year or so. We as a society do not take communication as seriously and beautifully as people once did. I am not it can ever be reclaimed. It does sadden me however as I speak better I am chosen over others for jobs and get more promotions etc. Just something to think about for people when they choose what they say and how they say it. Sad but also heartening for those of us that remember what communication is about. Thanks for responding to me.
@emeraldisle (13145)
• United States
24 May 07
I had a good laugh at some of the responses on here with this one :) I too have noticed this trend and it rubs my nerves the wrong way, far worse then nails on a chalk board. I have this problem also with things like warsh, instead of wash, and one my mother loves to do supbenie instead of subpoena. I just cringe when I hear things like. I know I'm not perfect but I try to get the words right. One of my other pet peeves is the word Celts, if you are talking about the basketball team it's an S sound like Selts but if you are talking about the nationality its with a hard c like Kelts.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
The only person I knew who warshed things was from West Virginia and when I met her family, I realized why, they were true Applalachia, no running water or electricity. This was about 40 years ago. I lost track of her, I wish I hadn't, because they were nice people and they wanted to learn. Her Mom said she wanted her kids to grow up better and be educated.
@nannacroc (4049)
24 May 07
Yes it drives me nuts. A friend always used to say can I axe you something and I kept saying no but you can ask, I got so fed up with it one day that I said, no you can't axe me, it would hurt and make a mess on the carpet, but you can ask. She got the message after that.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Wow, you got very graphic with your answer. Maybe we can do this as a public service announcement to demonstrate the difference between ask and axe.
@KrisNY (7591)
• United States
24 May 07
It drives me CRAZY! Let me ax you something- I also freak over brefest instead of breaKfast- I usually am able to keep it to myself- but I just wonder didn't these people learn English? I know my English and grammar is not perfect-- but all they have to do is pronounce the word. I hear it alot and it drives me crazy.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Exactly, my ENglish is not perfect either and I know my writing is awful, but this is a simple word that most 2 year olds can master and now we have adults who say it wrong and will pass it on to their kids. I fear that it is just going to get worse.
@maryannemax (12170)
• Sweden
24 May 07
i have heard people pronouncing ask as axe. but i just laugh at it. i guess they are doing it intentionally in a manner of joking about it. but i do admit that sometimes, it annoys me, too. but people has their own styles and that it's hard to tell them not to joke about everything especially when it comes to pronunciation.
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
I know people that do it all of the time and think they are perfectly correct in doing it so. I actually heard one person try to say it was an alternate pronounciation and it can be found in the dictionary. I could not believe the person knows how to use a dictionary.
• United States
24 May 07
Yes, there's people who have speech difficulties but stuff like this does not fall under that. I agree that it's just plain laziness. There's different colloquialisms in different parts of the country of course, but "axe" for "ask" is just plain bad grammar. "Axe" is an entirely different word, anyway - it's a noun, not a verb. This bugs me as much as people "saying "sangwich" for "sandwich." It's sand-wich even if you have speech problems... there's no g. I tend to notice this stuff too, can you tell? ;)
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
No I hadn't noticed..but I am glad that you spoke up. At least the people here on my lot can improve their speech habits.
@AmbiePam (51159)
• United States
24 May 07
Oh, my word! I'm not the only who hates that and hears it often? I lived in a place for 12 years, and that place had a certain population of people who almost always said 'axe' instead of 'ask.' It doesn't have to be a race that does it, because I've heard white people do it too. I wonder if it is being uneducated, or just hard for them to pronounce? Maybe a speed imepediment devoted to that one word?
1 person likes this
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Speech impediment - or just plain lazy. That is my feeling. And you are right, it is not racial, or educational. It makes me crazy.
@xbrendax (2668)
• United States
24 May 07
Believe me you are NOT the only one who notices it, we all do and we are all going crazy! my mother especially! She use to be an english teacher many years ago, (she is 74 now), and she goes NUTS when ever she hears people say things like: AX and BABY DADDY and HAD WENT, not to mention many others that it seems EVERYBODY is saying! We don't call that: going with the flow, or cool, or new age language, we call that for what it is, ( THE DUMBING DOWN OF AMERICA ), and other countries are laughing at us behind our backs! My family came from Cornwall, England and as you probably know, the British speak so properly.
@Debs_place (10524)
• United States
25 May 07
Had went..I don't think I have heard that either....but you are right, it is THE DUMBING DOWN OF AMERICA. I can imagine a 74 year old English teacher would find this very offensive. Tonight at work, I heard some mention going to the liberry instead of the library. Wonder what we can do about it...maybe a public service commercial to start teaching English to Americans.