Substitute teaching

United States
June 26, 2007 3:44pm CST
I'm thinking of subbing this year while my son is in kindergarten. I've gone through the process before, but never made it to the police station to do the police check (for no other reason then I got busy and it was too late by the time I got around to it.) I was curious as to what other areas pay their subs per day. I have a BA, but not in education, and I believe this year my local district will be paying about $65 a day which is reasonable around here.
3 responses
@tutor1235 (113)
• United States
11 Jul 07
I spent a while subbing (I'm certified special ed), and really enjoyed it. You'll want to stay organized, and develop a set of 'back up plans' for each age level you work with, though, because sometimes the teacher's plans aren't up to snuff or you won't be able to find what you need or whatever. Nothing is so awful as facing a roomful by the seat of your pants! I think pay in this area is $70-90 per day if you have a sub license, which is available to anyone with 2 years of college (no matter what area). And STILL the school is crying for subs, and some of the ones my kids have had really make me cringe. One spent the period talking to high schoolers about his hangover from last night's drinking binge! I can't imagine being that inappropriate! Another option you may want to consider (what works well for me!) is tutoring. I set my own schedule, determine my own fees, and basically answer to just myself. Through word of mouth alone, I nearly always have a waiting list for students, and I work about 30 hours a week right now (my kids are older-I started at about 10 hours a week). There's a huge need for tutors, with all the stress on minimum progress and standards, and if you like this, it's a way to stay home and still make money. Drop me a note if you want more info.
@mkirby624 (1599)
• United States
7 Jul 07
$65/day is actually pretty good. In the school district I teach in, subs only get $50/day, which I think is ridiculous. Even long term subs (who sub for maternity leave) still get the same amount, even though they actually have to have a degree. Subbing is a good way of checking out teachers you kid may have in the future and getting a feel of the atmosphere of the school. It's also a way to get to know the teachers. If they know you, they are likely to be nicer to your kid.
• United States
7 Jul 07
It depends on the district. Most districts pay based on weather or not you are a certified teacher, and how long your assignment is for. The district I subbed in last year paid certified teachers $70 a day but if I subbed 10 days or more in a row for the same teacher I was paid $100. I think for a non cetified sub the pay was $50 and $60 and day.