presents

@Trace86 (5033)
United States
December 26, 2007 10:53pm CST
I work in a nursing home and have received several individual gifts from some of the family members. Should I give them a thank you note? I mean, I would, but how can I be sure that they will get the note? Some of them are people that I rarely see. Should I do the cards and carry them with me just in case I see them? Or would a thank you and a hug be enough? Help!
6 people like this
13 responses
@drannhh (15235)
• United States
27 Dec 07
My reasoning here would be that if they include their full names and mailing addresses with the gift, then a thank you not would be in order, but if they omit their mailing information then the gift is informal, and therefore the thank you can be informal, too. The follow up they probably would like most would be no more than for you to mention them kindly in conversation with your charges, as in "It was so nice to see your daughter when she visited recently. She is such a thoughtful person!" That should be enough to make everyone happy.
2 people like this
@drannhh (15235)
• United States
27 Dec 07
Egads, a thank you NOTE is what I meant to say...but what I mean is that if they expect a written acknowledgment they would provide you with an address, so you shouldn't have to worry about formality.
1 person likes this
@JoyfulOne (6242)
• United States
27 Dec 07
Anytime a gift is given in appreciation, it's always nice to send a little thank you note. If you can't obtain an address, then keep the note in your locker (or in the patients drawer) until you see them again. That's really nice of them to do that, they clearly see you as doing a good job and taking wonderful care of their relative.
@psyche49f (2511)
• Philippines
27 Dec 07
Wow, you must be well loved by these family members...that's really great. There are many ways of saying thank you. For me, a hug would be more than enough. However, some may even send a thank you note, which you can do or both. But the important point is that you have expressed your gratitude either in writing (note) or non-verbally (hugs)...both would be sweet. Go ahead, hug those people who have been so thoughtful...if you could not see them personally, a note would do. I guess you just have to leave it at the counter or in the patient's room, to make sure the note reaches the right person. Godspeed!
• United States
27 Dec 07
you could carry around some thank you notes for them or even a hug and thank you would work very well too, its just up to you on if you want ti carry the cards around.
2 people like this
@asgtswife04 (2482)
• United States
27 Dec 07
I think that either would be absolutely wonderful for those families. It's obvious that they think very highly of you and wanted you to know that by giving you gifts or cards. I think that by at least acknowledging that you care and are thankful for the things they got would be enough to let them know. I think it is so wonderful. You should not only be thankful, but also proud of the work that you do because obviously it doesn't go unnoticed around there. God bless you
2 people like this
@foxyfire33 (10009)
• United States
27 Dec 07
Under the circumstances I would guve them a thank you and hug on the spot. A card later would be better but since you have no idea when you'll see them again and I'm sure with privacy laws you can't get their address, a thank you card wouldn't be practical. Do your residents have their own bulliten boards in their rooms? I know some places have that and maybe that could be an option...you could post a thank you note there for the family members you especially wish to acknowledge.
1 person likes this
@Trace86 (5033)
• United States
28 Dec 07
I did thank them immediately and hugged the ones I felt comfortable doing so with. Maybe I will put thank you notes in their rooms for the families. Thanks for the advice.
• United States
28 Dec 07
While a hug and a thank you would be plenty, I can assure you that your taking the time to write a note in thanks will NEVER be in bad form! It will also let them know how very much it meant to you to be remembered. If getting an address is a problem and you already hugged and thanked them, then you should be just fine.
1 person likes this
• Australia
27 Dec 07
I think thank you notes are great but unfortunately you don't seem to see them much nowadays. May be a quite email or phone call to let them know you appreciated the gift?
1 person likes this
@worldwise1 (14887)
• United States
27 Dec 07
Another thing you could do, Trace, would be to write a brief note to each one and leave it on the bedside table of the patient with the recipient's name clearly in view. You must be an awfully good worker.
@Sissygrl (10914)
• Canada
27 Dec 07
I think the thank you and the hug is enough, i mean, you dont go around giving thank you cards to everyone that gives you gifts do you ? lol. If i was you i would just say thank you and that should be enough. Or if you know where they live you could mail them a thank you card if you REALLY felt the need to :)
1 person likes this
@AmbiePam (51159)
• United States
27 Dec 07
I would write thank you notes, and have them with me so whoever I do see, I can give them to. But if you don't see everyone you wrote a note to, that is OK as well. The point is you tried. : )
1 person likes this
@kareng (18746)
• United States
27 Dec 07
I think cards would be nice but you are right--you may miss them. A personal thank you is also fine in my opinion. I'm sure you will figure out the best way to do this--maybe a card for the regular visitors and a personal thank you to the others? Happy New Year!
@sbeauty (5870)
• United States
30 Dec 07
As a Kindergarten teacher, I always get a ton of little gifts at Christmas time. I answer each one individually and send it through the mail, because by the time I get my gifts, school's out for the holidays. I feel that not only am I thanking the families/children, but I'm also teaching them the polite way to respond when they are given a gift.