Nature's Gifts Often Come In Misleading Wrapping.

Dandelion Clock - A child blowing a Dandelion Clock. "What's the time in Faerieland?"
@Darkwing (21588)
January 24, 2008 9:24pm CST
Let's consider the Dandelion. This wild flower is considered a weed by gardeners and landowners but the Dandelion has many uses, both culinary and as a medicinal herb. The plant's leaves can be eaten cooked, as in soup, or raw, as in salads, and is a great addition to boiled eggs in salad. The raw leaves (younger leaves), are quite bitter to the taste, and similar to mustard greens but they are high in vitamins A, C and iron. They even contain more iron and calcium than spinach, so are extremely good for you. The older leaves are the ones selected for use in cooking, in soups. The flowers are used in the making of Dandelion Wine and Dandelion Flower Jam and the ground and roasted root, as a coffee substitute. Drinking a leaf extract will purify the blood, in anemia, jaundice and the treatment of nervousness. Dandelion Root Coffee is said to stimulate digestive functions and function as a liver tonic if taken before meals, and Dandelion and Burdock is a popular UK soft drink, often found in Health Shops. The milky substance in the stems can be used to repel mosquitoes or rid oneself of warts without damaging the surrounding skin. Last but not least, I'm going back in time again. In fact, my grandchildren still get me to join in with this. After flowering, the Dandelion forms into a ball of fluffy, windborne seeds. These are dispersed by the wind, and are alikened to faeries by many youngsters. Roam among the meadows in late June or early July and you will see these little fluff balls dotted around. This, to many children is the Dandelion or Faerie Clock. Children pluck them from the earth, and ask "What's the time in Faerieland?" Then, they proceed to blow at the ball of seeds, which come away in sections and fly into the air with each blow. After each puff, the child will count, "One o'clock, two o'clock," etc. until all the seed are gone. Whatever time they've reached in blows is considered to be the time in Faerieland. Lovely memories of warm, breezy days of childhood. Of course, the Dandelion is not the only very versatile plant. Dog Roses and Clover are two more which spring to mind. There are several, which we could pass by without even a thought. Are you aware of the uses of wild plants and so-called "weeds"?
3 responses
@mummymo (23707)
25 Jan 08
I knew some of the uses of the dandelion my friend but i loved learning so much more! I guess I am kind of ignorant about nature so that makes it even more interesting when I learn new things! I try not to let Niamh blow the fairy clocks too often cos whatever number she blows is always am and then she tries to count from there til bedtime - no matter what the time really is! xxxx
1 person likes this
@Darkwing (21588)
27 Jan 08
Lol... there's no flies on your Niamh!!! Yes, Nature provides so much that we could use for food and medicines and not have to pay for, as long as we know what we're doing. Sometimes there's a caution as to how much, or how often we use them, but I'm really going to have to try some of this for myself. :) Brightest Blessings. xxx
• Canada
25 Jan 08
I just learned that dandelions are not native to America but were brought over by the settlers as food.I thought it was so cool and was interested in more info so thank-you.
1 person likes this
@Darkwing (21588)
25 Jan 08
You're quite welcome and thank you too, for the information. That's something I didn't know. lol. Brightest Blessings.
@GardenGerty (115969)
• United States
25 Jan 08
I think that is really neat. I had a grandmother who always would go out in the spring to pick poke, as it was available before any domestic greens. I never did a dandelion clock.I know that there are many uses for many wild plants.
@Darkwing (21588)
25 Jan 08
Yes, I've never tried soup or salads containing Dandelion leaves, but considering the vitamins and iron in the leaves, I think it might be a good move. Brightest Blessings.