Are Doctors. Doctors Anymore?

@pyewacket (44031)
United States
August 29, 2008 9:48pm CST
Okay you might be wondering what I mean by that...this is sort of a tie-in to my other medical type discussion as a poster there brought up a point that I have often wondered myself....are doctors, doctors anymore? Like what DO they do? Let me explain here. Growing up as a girl I went to our family doctor...he was to remain my family doctor until he retired while I had just graduated from college..so he was my doctor for a LONG time. He was a GP (General Practitioner) yet he did a lot..actually just about everything. His office with several exam rooms were so equipped they were like mini hospital units. He could do everything and anything...X-Rays, Blood tests, and the blood tests were tested and evaluated THERE in his own lab and they weren't sent out to a lab. I remember one time I developed two deep plantar warts on the same big toe...OUCH. Did he send me to a "Specialist"? NOPE. He was able to take care of the problem right then and there. Then another time I developed a God awful, painful sebaceous cyst on the side of my face..did he send me to a "Specialist"? NOPE..He performed the drainage of it. So what's going on with doctors nowadays? They don't do shat. Maybe at most a very mild exam like blood pressure, taking your temperature, mundane simplistic things like that. My current doctor doesn't even DO blood tests anymore...I have to schlep over to some lab a long ways from where I am....too far to walk and I don't have the transportation to go over there...so needless to say I haven't had any blood work done in awhile. Have a problem with feet, now a doc sends you to a podiatrist....have a mild skin problem..docs now send you to a dermatologist...In other words whatever the heck is wrong with you, instead of one's doctor being able to do a lot of the things like my old doctor did, they tell you to go to a specialist in the field. Just WHY is this? Doctors spend many years studying to become doctors...they have to know or should know a bit of everything...interns are shifted....one month they might be in pulmonary studies, next month pediatrics...and on and on. So why is it, since today's doctors do have to have a knowledge of a bit of everything, why don't they do more? Does anyone else find this not only ridiculous, but a passing of the buck kind of thing? Is it because today the medical field in general is so paranoid of medical malpractice that this kind of "practice" of palming people of to "specialists" so prevalent now whereas before one's family doctor could do just about anything and everything? And what guarantee that the specialist will help you any better? Last year I had this weird swelling on my right ankle joint...now my old doctor would have drained the fluid himself...did my current doctor??..NOPE..He recommended a foot doctor..it took many treatments but finally all the liquid was drained. Since I was going to him, I asked him about another problem....I KNEW from past experience that once again I had developed plantar warts on the soles of my feet....I asked him "are these plantar warts?" He said no and just scraped the callus area without getting to the core of the problem...I KNOW what plantar warts are like, yet how come this bozo didn't know? I've since "treated" them myself and they are gone---point being though, here was a "specialist" in foot care who didn't know what a plantar wart was. So just because one goes to a specialist doesn't make things "better" Anyone else have a rant about there medical care? Does your family doctor palm off responsibilities that maybe he could take care of and sends you to other doctors? Mmmm...thinking about trying to find another doctor....LOL
13 people like this
24 responses
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
30 Aug 08
I know exactly what your talking about but I don't think it's so much that they don't know but more that they don't care. They're in it for the almighty dollar and will let the nurse do all the work, walk in the door for a minute and that's all they have time for as they've also schedualed 20 other people for the same time as they have an 'appointment' with you.
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
30 Aug 08
I actually think nurses do more don't you? I remember when my mother was in the hospital the many times she was, that the doc would come in a few seconds, glance over the chart, maybe write something down, and walk out...it was the nurses who would administer or adjust the meds, make sure my mother ate, sponge bathed her, everything--can you imagine a doc doing that?
1 person likes this
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
30 Aug 08
No doubt at all in my mind that for the most part nurses do more than doctors. But, in all fairness to doctors I also know for a fact that not all are like this. My step-father is a doctor and my Mom is a registered nurse. They both work equally hard but I remember when they first got married we went 4 or 5 years where the joke was we couldn't get a picture of Jim without a phone to his ear - is was and still is available to his patients 24/7 and it did effect his children (from his first marriage - he almost neglected them emotionally without knowing it). Now, this man is one of the nicest, most generous men I've ever known but his kids resent him and his practice. He's retired now, if you can call it that, he sold his practice folks went to Bolivia for 5 years and lived in the jungles there doing medical missionary work now their back and he still works full-time at volunteer clinics, the migrant worker camps, and more. He will die I'm sure taking care of others.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
30 Aug 08
LOL...sounds like your step-father was the equivalent of ten Dr. Welby's..but I can see how that could have affected his family life by going the other extreme
• Canada
30 Aug 08
I think the problem with the health care industry these days is that there is no care left in it... it has simply become the health industry and nothing more. I remember my general physician that I had growing up would take her time and discuss things with my mother and I and she took her time to ask questions and to answer questions as well. These days its more about making a buck and getting people in and out of the office as quickly as possible. It feels like todays doctors and technicians in all areas of the health "care" industry have almost become similar to fast food chain. They don't care about the quality of the care any more they just want us in and out like a drive thru! I went for an ultrasound yesterday and I was hoping that at the end they would at least let me see my own baby and the technician simply stated that they didn't allot any time for that... excuse me... you are looking at my baby and you can't give me thirty seconds of your time to see my own baby? They just don't care and that is where all the problems lie!!!
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
30 Aug 08
You're so right in calling it an "industry" and I love the analogy you make that health care is like a fast food or drive in restaurant..in and out..quick in, quick out. What also amazes me is that I know several friends who have had surgical procedures recently and home the NEXT day...what kind of crap is that? It used to be if one had any kind of surgical procedure, big or small one was there in a hospital at least a week to make sure that no complications came up Your old family doc sounds like my old one I had...he too would take the time to talk about things and one could ask questions.
1 person likes this
@GardenGerty (115242)
• United States
30 Aug 08
My doc is physician on staff for a couple of nursing homes. He does not see all the residents, but sees any that do not have a regular doctor. Thing is, he does that BEFORE his regular hours. I have a doctor friend who gives one day a week to a charity clinic. My own doctor reminds me of a hyperactive little terrier dog, but he does answer questions for me, and he will tell me if he thinks I need more care than I am getting. He is here, he is there, but he remembers stuff that went on twelve years ago, and knows where my hubby works and treated my nephews when they lived here. Lots of my extended family has been in and out of his office, and he asks about all of them.
1 person likes this
@Hatley (164237)
• Garden Grove, California
31 Aug 08
hi pyewacket its not altogether my doctors fault as us hmo people are mandated to be sent to specialists when my primary care doctor could and sometimes did fix my problems himself.in a lot of cases though he would send me to a specialist as he was forced to do so by my insurance co. My rant is that I have a shoulder joint replacement of steel and plastic and after more than two years have only got back maybe fifteen percent usage of my left arm, the op. cost 86000 dollars which happily my insurance did pay. I had had a bad fall and smashed the bones in my left shoulder. the orthopedist never really told me that after months of physical therapy I might not get back the use of my left arm. he should have but he did not. why? I did the exercises month after month and yet cannot put my left hand on top of my head nor comb my hair with it or get things off the top of the refrigerator or any of a dozen things. grrrrrrrrrrrr.
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
3 Sep 08
What kind of health insurance do you have? That was great that they at least did cover the cost of that operation...yikes can you imagine if you had to pay it yourself...even as a co-pay? With my doc though it's different....it's not like I have the average hmo but on medicaid/HIP so I don't think my doctor is really obligated in sending me to a specialist for something he could really do himself--can't help wonder if docs get some kind of "commission" for referring people to specialist though...if they do, this could explain why they are so eager to send a person to specialist
@bunnybon7 (43294)
• Holiday, Florida
31 Aug 08
yep there was a time. i used to have good docs for many years but about 10 yrs ago, not able to ever find another good one anywhere.
2 people like this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
Same here. The doctor I began seeing after my old one retired was every bit as good and did everything as well ....but then another bunch of doctors were to take over his practice...it's been downhill since with them and it's like they couldn't give you the time of day
@Eskimo (2317)
7 Sep 08
First of all Pye, I work in a hospital lab, testing blood, I am highly trained in this. Blood test are much more specialised than they were 40 years ago, and have to be much more accurate, there are also many more tests than there were as well and I don't think there are many GP'S who could have that level of training. Secondly, in the U.K. medical training has been cut by several years, so that new doctors do not have the level of expertise or training that was given in these extra years of training, indeed most hospital consultants or GP's for that matter could give a very good diagnose from the patient's symptoms, now for a number of different reasons (including perhaps malpractice cases), they now wait for lab tests before giving a diagnoses that's one reason that patients can wait for several hours in Casualty (ER to you) before being properly treated. When I started there were around 50 blood samples a day, now it is around 1500. The same probably goes for every other type of procedure, almost everything is now dealt with by 'Experts' (who sometimes aren't as you have noticed), and GP's just don't have the time, experience or inclination these days to be as proficient as they were in the old days.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
9 Sep 08
As I mentioned my old doc used to do blood tests and was even able to "evaluate" them himself..now granted I do know that docs don't do this anymore...what IS aggravating though is that my current doctor won't at least even take blood tests and send them to a lab....now I have to go to the lab and it's several miles away...If I had a car and could drive, no problem, but I don't...so like how am I supposed to get there? As a result I haven't had any blood work in ages...I just can't get to the lab
1 person likes this
@Eskimo (2317)
9 Sep 08
If I lived a bit closer then I would come and take the blood myself, but your just so far away for me to be able to do this. Locally, most GP practices now have phlebotomists to take the blood for them. Even though the results are usually sent back electronically to the GP, either the same day or the next, patients are still told it takes 7-10 days for the results to come back.
@bellaofchaos (11549)
• United States
7 Sep 08
Doctors now a days aren't in it to help people they are in it for the fat paycheck they get. Yes they do alot of work but are their heart and souls into helping people.. I think that in a way the changes and progress have made us number and dollar signs instead of Amy or Jan or Eric down the road that the doctor has known all his life. I will say this I have a family doctor that I see yes he sends me for blood work but he also is in a building where I can go downstairs to get it done. LOL!! But he knows me on site and asks how I'm doing and he generally does fluff me off to anyone else. Grrr I hate being fluffed off. what about you?
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
9 Sep 08
It would be different if any specialist my doctor recommended was in the same building as him...but he wants to send me all around town...I don't drive or have a car...so like duh...how am I supposed to get to these places? Yup, hate being fluffed off too.
1 person likes this
• United States
9 Sep 08
I will say this they don't make doctors like they use to. I look at doctors like tissues any more, disposeable.. He he .. I think your new doctor needs to realize your needs and be more for the patient.
• United States
1 Sep 08
you can probably blame HMO's for that.. i think it was their idea to split it into specialty practice. and,of course more money for everyone. what kills me is when you have to "request" a specialist and the doctor can refuse to send you.they play that game with mom.oh you can still go,but the insurance won't pay without a referal.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
3 Sep 08
I didn't know docs could refuse sending you to a specialist if you request it...I mean I thought that was especially necessary if you wanted a second opinion. Also what goads me....the docs can't just refer you to any specialist...they have to check out their huge book of docs to see which one takes the same health insurance instead of going to a really qualified doc/specialist that might be better
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Sep 08
yea,if they feel you don't need it,they can. so it's their word over yours basically.i've been going back and forth with ma's about a cyst on her back.it needs treatment and he thinks it'll "go away". she doesn't like the referal system either.she's a bit wary of new (to her) doctors.
1 person likes this
@CatsandDogs (13964)
• United States
30 Aug 08
Thank you Pye for starting this discussion!! I've been thinking the same thing for a long while now and I'm soooo with you on this issue!! What ever happened to the doctors that did everything or almost everything?! I hate it when having been told I have to see a specialist in this and a specialist in that... arg!! Sometimes I wonder if it's because there's so many new diseases out there that no one can really handle them all and retain every little information about all the diseases. It could be the a thing about malpractice lawsuit type of issue but I'm not so sure because it seems every day there's a new disease that's discovered and there's just too many to remember all the symptoms and treatments. Then again, it could be a case of passing the buck because they're lazy and don't want to deal with something out of their comfort zone. Sometimes, I wonder why a doctor is a doctor because they're so moronic that I'll wonder, how in the world did they pass their medical bar exam?
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
Thinking of all the crap that you've been going through especially with your mother I can REALLY understand how you're feeling. I think a lot of it boils down to money, passing the buck, and docs being afraid of any malpractice suits...and of course the monopoly the health insurance companies now have over doctors in general. My great grandmother was a nurse, and thought all docs were idiots..even back in HER day...LOL
1 person likes this
@CatsandDogs (13964)
• United States
31 Aug 08
Oh my feelings run so deep with doctors now a days and have for a very long time because of my home town's hospital. They've built a brand new hospital and I vowed to never set foot inside unless I HAD to and well, I HAD to only because my grandmother was dying but did I admire what they built? Oh HELL NO! Because of what they did to my parents threatening to sue them over a $5,000. freaken bill that they were paying payments on!! Now that I'm in NC, the nearest hospitals in the area, which are quite a few, none of them are worth the ground they stand on!! NONE of them!! And here my parents moved down here partly to get away from home town, and to get away from the big city life that the town was growing into, to come to this place in hopes to find a better health care system only to find out it's just as bad if not WORSE for they set her back so many times and being this was our first go around with the hospital and dealing with stroke for the first time, we've learned a hell of a lot and I've lost all respect for anybody and everybody in the medical community because all they want is the almighty dollar! They couldn't care less about my mother, whom I love dearly, than they do the next old person because to them, they've lived their lives so the young are more important which is WRONG in every sense of the word!! They tried once with this red tape crap and I told them to go find a pair of scissors!!!! Let's cut out the bs and get my mother the help she needs!!!! They found out that this "B" isn't playing games!!
1 person likes this
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
30 Aug 08
Am like you I miss the od Doctors that could do every thing right there! Daughter asked me awhile back what did my primary Dovtor do ; I said nothing! takes temp Blood Presure and he dont even do that his nurse does! Oh He does hand out referals to other Doctors! I beleive its all in the money! Reg. Doc co-pay is $10 a visit. But his real bill is close to $80 what for to send you to some one else!. Then ya go to the specialist and co- pay there is $20 but his bill could well be $200 or more! Then they might not can cure the problem so ya have to go back to reg. Doc to be sent to another one! I got so tired of going to all these Doctors. And it is just plan wrong that a foot Doc. dont know what a planers wart is!
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
LOL--uh we don't go to the same doctor by any chance??...yours sounds exactly like mine.. Nope that foot doctor of mine was a real idiot
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
31 Aug 08
If ya live in Vegas we just might lol maybe they went to the same school! The family Doc that mom had when I was growing up took off a planters wart from the bottom of the heal of my foot . Told me all kind of things not to do while healing. well it wasnt healing fast enough so I went swimming it the lake anyhow and it dried up fast lol
1 person likes this
@faith210 (11233)
• Philippines
30 Aug 08
Hi pyewacket! I am in complete agreement with you my friend. When I was very young, the whole family goes to one doctor which was our family doctor and he treats everything too. Well, he passed away already. Now, I don't think I can find someone who can replace our good doctor who can do almost everything for us. Most are now practicing in their specialized fields and will surely refer you to another if your case is not within the area of their expertise. Expensive really! Take care always..God Bless!
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
Wouldn't it be great to have a doctor like we had when we were younger and who did everything instead of being told to go to a zillion specialists?
1 person likes this
@faith210 (11233)
• Philippines
31 Aug 08
Hi pyewacket! That would be truly great if there will still be doctors like that who can treat us without referring us to other doctors. It will save us time and money. Sigh! lovelots..faith210
1 person likes this
@worldwise1 (14887)
• United States
7 Sep 08
You really nailed it with this discussion, pyewacket! I have become so paranoid about doctors lately that I don't even trust the one I am now going to. I honestly believe the reason we are shifted from specialist to specialist is because they want to dig deeper into our pockets. I also remember a time when your family doctor did it all. You could take comfort in the fact that even though you were sick you were in the hands of a professional who was sort of like family. I had a similar foot problem several years ago and my doctor sent me to a podiatrist even though he was sure my problem was eczema. I was then treated by a process of elimination since he couldn't be sure exactly what my problem was. He even sent me to another doctor! They don't even consider that everyone doesn't drive when they send you to all of these different places. My doctor retired at the end of last year, and, sadly, I have not been able to find anyone with his bedside manner. I suspect the doctor I am now seeing of incompetence because she seems to be treating me by trial and error, so I am pretty much flying by the seat of my pants now -choosing what I think is best for me.
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
9 Sep 08
Well as I related I was going to a "specialist"--a foot doctor and yikes he sure didn't help me much...I had to wind up stop seeing him anyway as he no longer wanted to accept my health coverage...he told me to switch my coverage to another one....Was he nuts? Instead of going through all that paperwork to change coverage it be easier just to find another foot doctor...and one that KNOWS what plantar warts are.
@littleowl (7157)
2 Sep 08
Hi Pye you are talking about Drs well being epileptic I have to see a specialist at Kings College Hospital in London they are now getting so full of outpatients that when they had me in for tests they found out that I had 2 types of epilepsy..one non-epileptic and the other ordinary epilepsy so now have to go to the Maudsley Hospital in London too..my point is my neurologist said she didn't know enough about non-epilepsy to be able to help the illness thats why she would like to send me to the Maudsley..as you say after all the years of training they have on one specific illness why the hell don't they understand all of it!! OK Drs maybe becoming inundated with patients thats why we all have to go elsewhere which is a pain in itself but when it comes to aspecialist in a Hospital that doesn't know all the ins and ots of their specialised field What on earth is happening? Its like we are all guinea pigs nowadays..littleowl
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
3 Sep 08
Now that REALLY is ridiculous....one would think if one is already a specialist in a certain field they would know everything about it, not just one aspect....how stupid
@raydene (9874)
• United States
31 Aug 08
I live is a small town so out health center has about everything. That do exams, draw blood, do some tests. The day of the old country docs are past. xoxoxoxoxoxo
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
3 Sep 08
I sure wish the old country doc still existed though....my old doc even used to make house calls...can you imagine a doc doing that now?
@yogeshdhusa (2237)
• India
31 Aug 08
Hi pyewacket, Even my doctors is not a doctors any more.. we cant call the clinic but shop.. they are not doing it for their profession but just to earn money or expriment new medicin.. When i have typhod.. i visited my doctor he said its due to sinus and cold cough.. but the situation was not good.. not a single any progress.. that why i decided to consult other doctor .. now i am fit and fine.. but learnt a lesseon that change doctor but track your own medical history.. and keep record..thanks and enjoy :)
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
3 Sep 08
Yes I would think it would be wise to even have a copy of one's medical records so in case you do change docs they have a prior background of medical history
@MOMMASAM (1004)
• United States
31 Aug 08
well, i have a family doctor who is now called a PCP. this stands for primary care physician. this person is to be the main spring of your hub of patient care and your medical record. i know EXACTLY what you are saying, however, i believe specialists were "invented" for 3 reasons. number one: some doctors would prefer to only treat one disease, or a series of related diseases. for example ear, nose the throat. because this "system" is all related. one to the other. number two: many doctors do not have the time or energy to keep up to date on all of the body systems as a whole. medicine and diagnostic procedures are changing hourly. so, a family doctor could not possibly keep on top of all these changes. the journals that a doctor receives on a daily, weekly and monthly basis is crazy ! number three: with the advent of malpractice, i feel doctors only deal with what they feel comfortable dealing with. the patient who has a diagnosis out of their field, of routine medical care, are shipped to a specialist.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
That seems to be what all GP docs are called now...primary care physicians. And I get what you're saying as well, but to my mind it seems kind of ludicrous that what GPs used to be able to help a patient with, even rather simple minor things are now handed over to a specialist. And as in my case with my foot doctor...like how could he not recognize a plantar wart? Since I've had them before I KNEW what it was...a specialist is no guarantee that you'll get better help..I've heard this from too many people
@kenzie45230 (3560)
• United States
30 Aug 08
When I was young, doctors came to the house. And if one person was sick, he checked everyone, just in case... Back then, every doctor didn't have all kinds of equipment in his (almost always a male doc) office. Instead, for tests one went to the hospital. I think that was good. Why should every doc's office have every kind of machine/contraption? Doesn't that mean it costs more? Today's docs prescribe medicine and send you to specialists. That's it, as far as I can tell.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
You just reminded me of something else...my old family doctor also made house visits as well. Not so much for me but for my grandmother who had very bad asthma and often came by--can you imagine a doctor making house visits now? No way!
@palonghorn (5483)
• United States
30 Aug 08
I actually don't have a problem with someone in the medical field specializing in one thing or another. That 'should' imply that they have studied, in depth, what ever field they have specialized in. I do, however, have a problem with a G.P. or D.O. that does not tell you, I don't know, I don't specialize in this field so I'm going to send you to see another doctor. I don't have a problem with a doctor telling me, I'm not sure of what is going on, so I want you to go see a specialist. I saw a D.O. (never again, I want an M.D.) that barely did more for an injury to my wrist than to take my blood pressure. He never once saw the initial xrays that were taken, and after 2 months ordered an MRI. After 3 months, I finally said, something is not right with my wrist, it is swelling and the swelling has never gone down, and at that point he sent me to an Orthopedic Specialist. I am finally getting some answers now. Keep in mind, 1/2 of the doctors graduated in the bottom 1/2 of their class! And what do you call the one that graduated at the bottom of the class.......Doctor!
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
Just goes to show you though that specialists aren't so great either, right? If they ARE supposed to be specialists then they should really know the ins and outs of a particular problem...like I related with my foot doctor who said, "Oh no those aren't plantar warts" when I darn knew they were
@polachicago (19073)
• United States
30 Aug 08
Here in USA doctors are working for Insurance. They do only treatment covered by insurance. No one is working on prevention. By prevention I mean proper nutrition based on individual need, not an exam in doctor office. This is also the only country where you have to sit in doctor room alone waiting for doctor for one hour or longer. There is much better doctors attitude in countries where health care is free. I was seeing doctors in Europe and in USA in August. Big difference. In USA doctors always recommend more expensive treatment, not what is the best for you. This is very scary. As far as specialty, family doctor should know all about his patients. There is no need to send patient to specialist for minor treatment. In Europe you can go to apothecary and talk to pharmacologist for minor problems and buy medications. You don't have to see the doctor, pay for the office visit to get prescription. Also, you see doctor for 3 minutes, because most of the time you see only his nurse. I am hopeless to find honest doctor in USA. Maybe in small town somewhere over the rainbow.
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
I think that is when we saw the dramatic changes and decline to true health care like the kind my old doctor had when health insurance took over and gee to ever think that pharmacists/apothecaries could take care of a lot of our needs sounds like a dream. Some years ago, I had no health insurance..I now do have Medicaid/HIP...anyway there were a few times when I would have a bout of bronchitis I resorted to going to my pharmacist to get an antibiotic..and of course would have to pay FULL price of it...but it was better than going to both my doctor, pay x-amount of money for the doctors visit AND pay full prescription costs at the same time...I just couldn't do it. Also, even though I do have Medicaid/HIP once docs find out you have Medicaid they don't necessarily treat a person as well on Medicaid as they do on some private health insurances
@gemini_rose (16192)
30 Aug 08
My doctors are actually OK, they do what they can themselves first before they refer me on to anyone else and they are very thorough. They do a bit of palming off though but they palm us off onto a nurse sometimes. Actually sometimes the nurses can be better than a doctor!
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
I know...nurses actually can do more and better than the doctor...I remember the nurse "Kitty" who worked for my old doctor..she was the one who usually took the blood tests..she was so gentle, couldn't feel anything...and while my doctor was a good one, the one time he did the blood work on me I was screaming in pain as his touch wasn't as gentle....sheesh
@abhichin (159)
• India
30 Aug 08
Yes, doctors know how to do, but it is the money which changes everyone. It may be due to the money that your doctor made links with other doctors so that he can get some comission from that doctor also...
1 person likes this
@pyewacket (44031)
• United States
31 Aug 08
How true..I just bet doctors do get some kind of commission by referring their patients to specialists--how sad that it all comes down to money