Should children be 'trained' the same as dogs?

@marina321 (4561)
September 1, 2008 4:31pm CST
I was reading an article in the paper the other day: According to a dog and cat expert; to raise children we should use a firm voice and reward obedience with treats. [i]Training both requires the same basic rules; rewarding good behaviour and ignoring the bad. Dog trainers say children respond to discipline similar to that given to young puppies.[/i] What do you think? Would you try this with your own kids? Have you put it to the test yourself? Have you had any benefits from following a similar approach to discipline?
8 people like this
27 responses
@onlydia (2808)
• United States
2 Sep 08
No I don't agree. If you ignored all bad behaviour you would end up with a monster. lol. There are somethings you can't ignore. Ther are somethings that a child does that could kill him/her. turning on the gas. not funny. sticking things into light sockets. Running out into the middle of a busy street. the list can go on. So no I don't agree with that. I didn't do that. My grad. high school had a job. My sister did the other most of the time her kids didn't grad. and don't have jobs. Well, one does now he is 29. The other is 28. Mine is 18
2 people like this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones.. and yes, some bad behaviour should not be ignored:)
1 person likes this
@onlydia (2808)
• United States
3 Sep 08
my son had a tantrum in the store when he was about 2 1/2 on the floor kicking and screeming. I layed down and showed him how to do it better. He looked at me stopped and never did it again. Thank goodness as I never wanted to do that again.lol
2 people like this
@se7enthbird (8324)
• Philippines
1 Sep 08
my son is two years and a a half. my wife is good on disiplining him and training him. she told me that i spoil my son too much. for me i dont spoil him. i see my wife very firm when it comes to him so if we are both firm then that would be very traumatic for my child. so i just make the balance. my son is two but no longe r uses disposal diapers well except when we go out to the mall or at the park. he knows how to pray before sleeping and some things that i am so amazed that my wife has taught him. it is funny to read but i think that is true.
2 people like this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
it is funny to read but i think that is true. It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
• Philippines
3 Sep 08
yes it is funny to read that the people who wrote that are comparing it with puppies. i think we can also teach older kids but it all depends in the approach and of course patience. that is only my views for i have nephew and nieces that are around 7 tp 12 years old that can be trained and disiplined but it also depends on their character.
@xParanoiax (6997)
• United States
2 Sep 08
Er, there were treats when I was growing up...but I don't think ignoring bad behavior works really well with children...considering how my little brother turned out, anyway. Mom never ignored bad behavior with me and I turned out fine, while on the other hand my brother's gotten away with alot and is showing delinquent tendencies. I was never "trained" and neither was my brother and half brother. Kids need parenting and teaching...they're not pets, they're children. And everyone disciplines their kids their own way...if I ever have kids, my way will probably be a calm conversation about why doing certain things is bad and makes me unhappy. "You don't want to make your Mommy sad, do you?" I've babysat and I've raised animals. I know there's a difference, and I've done fine on both occasions, so meh.
1 person likes this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
• United States
2 Sep 08
I noticed that you said you would probably use "You don't want to make mommy sad" as a deterrant, and under this theory that's actually a bad thing to do. At a young age, kids can't tell a negative reward from a positive reward, any effect that their behaviors have would be considered "positive reinforcement". Technically, making mommy sad is "positive reinforcement", and the child would repeat the behavior. I think when kids are a little bit older that approach would work.
• United States
2 Sep 08
Case-by-case basis, all children are budding individuals. Sometimes ignoring works when its for attention, since its not all the time... And Sooobored; if what Mom says is true, it worked fine on me. How is "Mommy being sad"...positive? You kinda gotta teach the difference between good and bad things to children before alot of teaching works, and younglings usually understand it best in the form of emotions before they can start understanding the articulation of it later.
@kerriannc (4280)
• Jamaica
2 Sep 08
The bible say teach the child in the way she/he should grow. I can tell you from experience that if you train your child to obey you even when he/she has grow that respect will always be there. I am not going to tell you to reward your child if he/she has done well because suppose one day you can reward what will you do. Just bring up your child the way you know is correct.
1 person likes this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!', a kiss, a hug, a pat on the back or head and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@Jul14nch0 (1414)
• Argentina
2 Sep 08
Yes maybe it works same but for both Never hit or stop feeding them for discipline, they will finish hateing you..
1 person likes this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@mhonna (40)
• Philippines
2 Sep 08
Children are not dogs and dogs are not children. Dogs are meant to be trained while children are meant to be loved and love others. Show our children the greatest love she/he want to have.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@hellcowboy (7380)
• United States
2 Sep 08
That is a very interesting theory my friend and it makes some sense because in a way I believe it is possible to use the same concept as you would with a puppy except on a different level,because a puppy can not talk to you when they are good or bad, whereas a child can and I think it might would help to reward a child when they are good and I might would try this with mine and my fiances children whenever we do have children.
1 person likes this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@AbbeyB (670)
• Spain
2 Sep 08
Although I find this funny I dont agree with it after all a dog is far more obedient than children and you get unconditional love from your dog where the kids only love you for your money LOL
@pehpot (4762)
• Philippines
2 Sep 08
Oh I kinda like your response! as expected every one who posted a response has violent reaction on the technique.yours was different and funny too!
1 person likes this
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@Hatley (164231)
• Garden Grove, California
2 Sep 08
hi maybe they have a point as a lot of kids acting up is to get the parents attention any way they can so ignoring' something thats not dangerous might be a great idea. I do think that most parents rely too much on spanking. I was never spanked and I turned out to be a good,decent, civilized woman so why beat on the kids. I tended to ignore whining and silly stuff and discipline with time out for the bigger things. my son also turned out to be a wonderful man.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@pehpot (4762)
• Philippines
2 Sep 08
I believe in that approach. The only way you can tell kids that the things they do is good or bad is through your action, kids cannot still comprehend what you say. The only thing that make this look bad is because it is being compared to dogs, when in some countries dog is such a low kind of animal. Kids leashing for an example is a no no in some countries because it makes the kid look like a dog leashed on the parent. To me it is perfectly normal,and it is ok to me that some people would compare my kids to dog. there is o difference actually, with puppies and babies. they are both tiny and needs to be take care, and they don't understand adult talk. As for the training technique, it seems to be effective in my case, although it is hard to ignore them when they do bad, but I try as mush to reward them when they do good. (like patting the head )
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@Ravenladyj (22936)
• United States
2 Sep 08
My kids are teenagers now and NO I did not "train" thme like they were my dogs AND I never would....I actually think that method is just asking for trouble to be honest with you...I would tink that the child would grow up to EXPECT treats for behaving properly etc and thats just a bad scene in the making...
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'thumbup and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@sumiirajj (1983)
• India
2 Sep 08
Hi marina,I feel its inhuman to treat children as dogs.Children have more understanding capacity than dogs then why to treat them as dogs.Children go to school to learn obedience and discipline,so more than that I think its unnecessary.I dont want to test this myself ,let the dog trainers test this for their kids.Thanks for sharing. Happy mylotting.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
• Singapore
2 Sep 08
actually no. it does not work. it will work at the current moment. but as they grow up, your method of disciplining them will backfired. treating them based on merits is good to some extent, but by ignoring the bad behavior,they do not learn anything. when they grow up, it would seems to them that you don't much care. so my idea is that you reward the good, correct their wrongs. this will work out in the long run.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to teach an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@JUNGLE (1157)
• South Africa
2 Sep 08
No! No! No!, children are not animals.If these dogs(the trainers themselves) want children to be trained in this way then I suggest they do it to themselves.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!'and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to teach an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@Foxxee (3653)
• United States
2 Sep 08
children are not animals and like someone else stated on here, our children should be taught not trained. and a child shouldn't be rewarded a treat for doing good... there are other ways to show your child your greatful and pleased with their good behavior.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent Foxxee. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!', a hug, a kiss, high five and the like... This theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
• India
2 Sep 08
Training is important for everything in this world to be perfect. At least when trying to be perfect. But it doesn't have to be children as trained as dogs. Though the children can be trained as dogs but should not be treated as dogs. We should be taking more care for children as they have more emotions than a k9.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
• Philippines
2 Sep 08
Humans are humans and animals are animals.. parents are old enough to know what's the difference between the both.. so that's not right to treat them like animals.. You must have patience only don't tream them like a dog or what other kind of animals...If your a parent, then you know when to discipline your child but if you got hypertension, you must explain to your kid/s your status and they will understand even though they're still childs (must be in 6 years old above to talk with things like these). Happy mylotting
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
t is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one... It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
2 Sep 08
Hi marina321, I have no children so I don't rightly know but If I did have children yes I would train like you train puppies, these nothing wrong with that, you might get a well bechave children in the long run and may be well behave when they are in their teens, I think people should try it. Tamara
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
It is true to some extent. When a toddler is throwing a tantrum, you do not fuss about it, ignore and it will go away.. If they do something well, you reward with praise 'Well done!' and the like... I think the writer of the article was trying to say something similar but they've only worked with dogs and cats mostly so it didn't quite come across as it should or well, that's my wild guess on this one.. It is obviously easier to train an animal that doesn't speak back or cry than a child plus this theory will only work with very young children or toddlers and not the older ones
@walijo2008 (4646)
• United States
1 Sep 08
I think it could work, I've never tested it myself because I don't have children, but dogs are like your children, you have to do them the same as you do your kids.
@marina321 (4561)
2 Sep 08
dogs are like your children Ok, I do not have a dog but it's not the same thing dear.. You will see when you have your own
• Philippines
14 Sep 08
Good day... I don't think that training dogs should be compared or even analyze as to like training kids. I mean we don't even come from the same species. Personally, I would teach my kids as my parents had taught me and not listen or read things regarding training about animals or dogs for that matter.