Should there be a dress code at the polls?

@Bd200789 (2994)
United States
October 4, 2008 7:22pm CST
In Pennsylvania, a voter was told to cover the writing on her shirt before she voted in the state's presidential primary. She was wearing an Obama shirt. The Republican Party supports a dress code and Democrats oppose it. I think a dress code is ridiculous. What do you think? Here's the link to the story. http://home.peoplepc.com/psp/newsstory.asp?cat=Strange&id=20081004/48e6ea40_3ca6_1552620081004-1272685518
6 people like this
18 responses
• United States
5 Oct 08
Are you SERIOUS???? Where is our free speech?? So we're allowed to campaign up until the actual election and then we can't?? That's crazy. =/
2 people like this
@jerzgirl (8170)
• Gloucester City, New Jersey
5 Oct 08
There are laws preventing it within so many feet of the polling site to prevent intimidation tactics that have been used in the past. But, I don't see a t-shirt being a method of intimidation unless they have it lit up and singing!!
• Canada
5 Oct 08
I think it stinks! If she wants to wear an Obama shirt she has the right to do so. If someone else wants to wear something for McCain and Palin, they have a right to do that too. As long as it doesn't say "screw (insert name here)" or something negative about the candidate there should not be a problem, and even if it does, what can they really do about it? What ever happened to the first ammendment?
2 people like this
@keasling (723)
• United States
5 Oct 08
You are not allowed to campaign at the polls. Her shirt is considering campaigning. So yes she should cover it up.
2 people like this
5 Oct 08
Hi Bd200789, When voters go to the poll to vote, its suppose to be a secret vote so if people going to be wearing politian's name on their t-shirt then everyone will know so that is why they say cover up. Tamara
1 person likes this
@jerzgirl (8170)
• Gloucester City, New Jersey
5 Oct 08
Where I vote, some guy always finds a reason to peak over the curtain to see what you're doing claiming he's trying to see if you need help. And, my landlady who helps count votes always announces who voted for the opposition because they match the ballots to the sign in sheets to see who voted against them. That's how my support for Obama in the primaries made the rounds in our town. And, they don't see anything wrong with it.
1 person likes this
5 Oct 08
Hi jerzgirl, That is so bad, in our country everbondy has the colour pen and several voteing areas to write you votes in. Tamara
@Ithink (10569)
• United States
5 Oct 08
No I dont think their should be a dress code, I think it is just plain stupid. I however would like to know why they want a dress code??? What is the reasoning to want one? Are the afraid that those voting havent really made up their minds and might be swayed by a saying on a shirt?
1 person likes this
@Bd200789 (2994)
• United States
5 Oct 08
That's exactly what I was thinking. Besides, if a t-shirt can cause you to change your opinion, you didn't believe strongly enough in the candidate you were planning to vote for.
1 person likes this
@stephcjh (32303)
• United States
6 Oct 08
I think people should be able to wear what they want to as long as they are presentable. I think there should be some rules and guidelines to follow though.
1 person likes this
@mikeysmom (2091)
• United States
5 Oct 08
i think a dress code at the polls is ridiculous and it is just one more thing they are looking to control in our lives. it is a crock. people should be able to wear anything they want.
1 person likes this
• India
5 Oct 08
I don't belong to the states... but somewhere i kinda like the idea of a dress code. No matter what the issue be, be it school, college, a workplace... or for that matter, even for voting.. a dress-code is just perfect. It brings about a sense of equality..
@peavey (16991)
• United States
5 Oct 08
It's not legal to engage in political propagandizing at the voting polls. What's the question? Should she be allowed to break the law? Besides that, it shows a distinct lack of maturity and taste to wear something like that to vote. It would never have to be an issue if people would only think for themselves now and then.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Oct 08
Just don't show up with your utters hanging out, that's my only requirement. If somebody wants to show up with a Nobama shirt on and they're standing in line behind an Obama supporter then let the good natured ribbing continue. People need to get a life.
@Bd200789 (2994)
• United States
10 Oct 08
For once, I agree with you! I don't see what the problem is.
@twoey68 (13651)
• United States
12 Oct 08
I say wear what you want...if your sure of who your voting for it shouldn't matter if the guy/girl next to you is wearing a shirt or button supporting a different candidate. [b]~~IN SEARCH OF PEACE WITHIN~~ **AGAINST THE STORMS, I WILL STAND STRONG** [/b]
@rocketj1 (6960)
• United States
5 Oct 08
Laws are made for a reason. The reason here being that no one should be intimidated or swayed from making their own choices at the polls. Obviously a t-shirt is not a huge intimidation but when you start nit-picking about what is allowed, it just gets silly and time-consuming. Her right to wear a t-shirt should not override my right to freely vote without intimidation. In other words, that right should not be greater than the right to vote.
@drannhh (15237)
• United States
5 Oct 08
If it is against the law to have signage favoring one party over another in an election, then a rational person would understand that it is inappropriate to wear a shirt that portrays a candidate in any manner. If people don't like a law, the appropriate thing to do in a constitutional republic is to change the law, not just flagrantly violate in with an "in your face" attitude. I think wearing a political shirt to the polling place is ridiculous. I was also shocked to learn that in a survey it was found that 70 percent of Obama supporters do not think that supreme court justices should follow the law when they rule in a case, but rather think they should use their own best judgment. That is really scary. No wonder so many democrats are saying they will vote for McCain.
@anniepa (27523)
• United States
5 Oct 08
I agree it's ridiculous but I'm not at all surprised that the Republicans support it. the party that keeps talking about getting government "out of our way" are the ones that think they can tell people what to do in their personal lives. Annie
@laglen (19778)
• United States
5 Oct 08
I am a republican but I would never support this. For crying out loud, if a t shirt somebody was wearing at the polls swayed your vote then what else would have????
@sedel1027 (17850)
• United States
5 Oct 08
The first poster is correct about campaign materials at the poll. However, yes there should be a dress code. I don't think folks should go stand in line to vote wearing clothing that would be inappropriate in a family environment.
@mcat19 (1357)
• United States
5 Oct 08
You can't campaign within a certain distance from the polls. The Obama shirt would be considered campaigning. I work the polls and have to bring a jacket to cover my political shirts when I go inside to vote. This has always been true. I never considered it a dress code.
@jerzgirl (8170)
• Gloucester City, New Jersey
5 Oct 08
Other than clothing that isn't indecent or exposing private parts, there should NEVER be a dress code and there should NEVER be a ban on showing support for your candidate (unless you're shoving it someone's face which can be handled without a dresscode). But, since you're not allowed to stump for candidates at the polling place, I'm guessing that an Obama shirt (or a McCain shirt) constitutes stumping, so they prevented it. I don't know. That's probably how they got away with it, though. Personally, though - unless you are standing out front making sure everyone sees your shirt or waving signs in their faces, I personally don't see a problem with it. Otherwise, in some polling places (like our local fire hall), even bumper stickers could be subject to removal if they're within "x" number of feet of the polling place. I think common sense should prevail. If you're not pushing it on anyone, leave it alone. If you are, then you should be made to stop.