If you don't vote, you can't bitc*.

United States
November 4, 2008 9:31pm CST
Bullshi*. Pardon my not really French. I am an American citizen. Under the laws of this land, I have the freedom to say what I feel I need to say, whether I vote or not. My freedom of speech, and yours, is not conditional. It is enshrined in the highest documents of this land as a God given right, whether there is a God or not. You can not limit that without having to modify these core documents of our nation. Now, many people think that voting, especially when it comes to the presidency of the United States, is a duty or requirement. Again, no. It is a privilege. The government is kind enough to allow us our input into who is going to lead us from the local level clear up to the national level. In no way, shape, or form is anyone required to vote. The day that people are required to vote will be the day when the government of the United States takes a major step on the road to tyranny. For those of you that are capable of forming a biased opinion on everything from the very important, such as who you think should be the next President of the United States, to the inconsequential minutiae, like who you think should be the next American Idol, part of me envies that capability. The other part of me is a cynical, disillusioned, lower middle-aged man who has better things to do with his time than participate in what frequently are just popularity contests. And so far, the cynicism wins every time. Again, our freedom of speech is guaranteed. This means you are as entitled to tell me "If you don't vote, you can't bitc*," as I am to tell you "Bullshi*," in response. And with that, I make my first post here on myLot after a long hiatus. Thank you for reading, and have a nice day. My $0.02 at the moment.
2 people like this
5 responses
@spalladino (17921)
• United States
5 Nov 08
Voting is not a privilege, it's a right that many gave up their lives for. Sure, you have the constitutional right to b*tch without bothering to vote and those you b*tch to have the constitutional right to ignore you.
3 people like this
• United States
5 Nov 08
I can concede that voting could be covered as an aspect freedom of speech or freedom of expression. I will however, express the opinion that those who chose to give their lives gave them for more than strictly freedom of speech. You have the right to ignore anyone's bitc*ing, whether they voted or not :)
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Nov 08
I first voted in 1980 when I was 29 years old. All through the 70's I would bitc* and complain about all the issues confronting America, especially the local issues. Then an elderly gentleman confronted me and asked if I had voted. I told him no that I didn't. I got a small lecture about while freedom of speech, freedom of expression, freedom of the press, etc. was hard fought for, not just on the battlefield, but also in the voting booth. It is guaranteed in our Constitution that we can say what is on our minds when needed. We also have the right to vote for our representatives in government and to vote on referendrums, propositions and amendments to our Laws. I was informed that my father, my grandfathers, and my great-grandfathers all fought to keep those rights for me. To not exercise them was, in a way, not respecting my elders. But he impressed upon me that while I have the constitutional right to complain, and stand up on a soapbox to bitc*, I could not be respected if, when called upon to make my opinion, my preferences known by voting, then I should kindly sit down and keep my mouth shut! My $0.01 for the thought....
3 people like this
@GardenGerty (130190)
• United States
5 Nov 08
Hi, the dragon has fire. You are correct, we do not have to vote. Sometimes I have, sometimes I have not. I did this time. I would like it much better if my vote counted individually,not as part of the electoral college, but it does not. I am more hopeful about my local level elections, and feel that they effect me as much or more than the national elections. No one person can or will make or break this country, he/she will have to have the support of all the other politicians. Have a good evening with you and your cynicism. Nice to see you around.
• United States
5 Nov 08
My problems seem to stem from the fact that I tend to be a fairly passive person. For presidential elections, there is a so much of a glut of information on all possible information channels that you can't help but see it unless you are a hermit. Anything else, and there's little to no widespread information dissemination, so it seems to me that you've got to do some digging on your own.
1 person likes this
@myklj999 (52190)
• United States
5 Nov 08
All I can say it that it makes you part of the problem, not part of the solution. If you want to b!tch, but don't want to make any effort to change things, then really what's the point?
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Nov 08
I will correct you here. I am not part of the problem, I am the whole problem. All the trials and tribulations that the country, nay, the world goes through are the result of me and my cynicism not going out to vote. End sarcasm. I am not part of the solution as most people see it, no. I will admit that. However, that makes me part of the problem? Define the problem, then. I'm not a Christian, so does that automatically make me a Muslim? I'm not a fish, does that automatically make me a bird? This sort of "if you aren't part of category A, you must be part of category B" thinking and completely ignoring the existence of category C and possibly even categories D-Z or more, is a problem. I am a full-time employed American citizen who does not try to illegally avoid paying my taxes. I try to make ends meet and have a little left over for security and entertainment. I'm not pumping out babies by multiple mothers, I'm not robbing banks, I'm not driving through residential neighborhoods shooting up random houses, I'm not trying to get free handouts from the government on specious injury claims. Again, if none of this is a facet of what you are defining as the problem, please elaborate so that I may address your specific concerns. I think I'd be more inclined if I really felt that any effort on my part would be inclined to change things.
1 person likes this
@katran (585)
• United States
5 Nov 08
Basically what I read from that entire rant was that you are enjoying your free ride. You are enjoying the fact that you aren't going to be killed (or worse) for complaining about the state of the government, but you are not doing anything to ensure that things stay that way. In other words, you are proud of being ungrateful. Congratulations to you. There are millions upon millions of people in the world who would kill in order to be in a position to vote to change the way their government is run. There are millions upon millions of people who are stepped on by their government and would give anything to have the rights you have. You are taking your right for granted. Which IS you prerogative, to be fair. You can do whatever you want to do. That's the beauty of this country. Some people see how beautiful that reality is and take advantage of the privileges they have, and some people ignore the beauty of it and...sit at home and b*tch. It's completely your decision.