Do you find you get the blues in winter or days without sun?

@nanajanet (4436)
United States
November 17, 2008 12:35am CST
I know that I feel a huge difference when there is no sun. It is not so bad in warm weather when I can have the windows open and get fresh air, but when it is cold and I have to have the windows shut and there is no sun, I have to push myself to do stuff and feel very tired, and a bit grumpy. I would not say sad, but some people are sad with the "winter blues". Is there anything that you do to help yourself with this? I know Vitamin D is a big factor, so without the sun giving us the vitamin, we have to find other ways to get it. Also, I have seen that they have bulbs now that replicate the sun's rays that some say helps. I found this article that I thought that I would share, too. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/11/15/how-to-fend-off-depression-in-winter.aspx
2 responses
• United States
17 Nov 08
My roommate has SAD (seasonal affective disorder), so I know exactly what you're talking about nanajanet. He tends to "hide" from sunlight - when we first met, he was living in a single room with one window. That window was shaded by an enormous, overgrown rhododendron - and he had covered that window with a room darkening shade AND light blocking draperies. Even now, he lives in the one room in the house that has very little natural light. By contrast, both my bedroom and the living room have four BIG windows that face southeasterly and west, so that those rooms get full sunlight nearly the entire day. I love spending my time in those two rooms (and in the kitchen which gets a little less light but is still sunny and bright). Some of the things you might do to help are: 1. Switch your regular light bulbs to light bulbs that give full-spectrum natural light (here's something about that from mercola.com - http://products.mercola.com/light-bulbs/ ) and make sure that you have light on at least 8 hours a day. Those bulbs also happen to be more energy efficient, so you'll probably see a savings on your electric bill, too. 2. Pull back the drapes. I know my mother's winter curtains were always heavy and dark. I try to use transparent plastic to reduce heat loss, but make sure that the windows are unblocked as much as possible during sunlight hours to let in as much sun as possible (bonus - the sunlight warms up the house and cuts down on heating costs too) 3. Make a standing date with a friend or neighbor to get outside for a while every single sunny day. Take a walk around the block together, or find a coffee shop with a sunny window and have a coffee together. You get the double bonus of company and sunlight. Those are just a few suggestions - I'm sure others can come up with other ideas, too.
@nanajanet (4436)
• United States
17 Nov 08
I am lucky that I have lots of sun in my house, too, but I did buy those bulbs and I think it makes a difference, when they are on. In fact, I was using them before I knew that they helped with the blues because they were energy efficient. I cannot believe anyone, but a vampire, would hide from daylight!! Wow! We take our granddaugter outside as often as possible, since she lives with us. She loves getting outside and it is good for all of us.
• United States
17 Nov 08
Aren't kids just amazing? My dad has always been a bit of a grump and we just accepted it as "that's how he is". For the past 15 years, he's struggled with serious health problems, including skin cancer (twice), colon cancer (once) and prostate cancer (once). My mother had given up on getting him to get out and exercise more, and to eat healthy. He was spending all his time slouched in front of the television or reading. Then along came my youngest nephew - their tenth grandchild. Mikey is ten years younger than the next youngest grandchild, and the first one of the grandchildren born since my dad's retirement. Oh, my word! What a difference he's made in their lives! The last time I was down for a visit, my dad was crawling around on the living room floor playing "fort" with Mikey. He's an entirely different person - so happy and energetic and so much healthier.
1 person likes this
@bhanusb (5710)
• India
17 Nov 08
We the people of tropical countries get enough sun light.So we get enough Vitamin D.I heard in cold countries especially in Europe most of the people suffer from skin diseases due to want of sun light.In tropical countries this prblem is much less.In rainy season(June to August) most of the time our sky remains cloudy.Then I feel bore.The whole winter our sky remain full blue,no cloud.I also like blue sky.But in our city life we can only see a piece of sky.
@nanajanet (4436)
• United States
17 Nov 08
When I was in Ketchikan, Alaska, the "Salmon Capital of the World", has rain every day of the year, but a couple of days. When we were on a tour bus (lovely area by the way), the tour guide said, "We have two types of weather. Rain.... and about to." LOL He also said, "We have no skin cancer, but lots of depression." I believe it!! I could not live there. Another reason why, Seattle, which is a beautiful city, and England, are places that have too much rain for me. I cannot even imagine living where they have night, all day long, half of the year. I would have to leave if I was born there, lol.
@bhanusb (5710)
• India
17 Nov 08
Alaska is the land of Eskimos.Everywhere ice and ice.Isn't it? Nature has many shape, many beauty, many colour.White is one of those.You enjoyed the chilly wind of Alska.Also enjoyed cold ice , igloo and snow fall.If I could go there,but never.You are so lucky.Thanks a lot.
1 person likes this