Born as...

@krajibg (11934)
Guwahati, India
June 5, 2009 1:52am CST
By birth an Irish or an Indian. What this means? I have given a lot on this thing but have not reached any conclusion yet. The issue is something like this - you are an English man, or an Indian or a Hungarian but you were not born in the places specified. Say I am an Indian living in Canada but I was born in Canada as third or fourth generation of my Indian root. Would I still be refereed as Indian or a Canadian? I feel as I am born in Canada and I have all my loyalty and committment towards this country and India is a foreign land for me why should I be labelled as an Indian? Is the case so or something else? In my view whatsover my originality if I am born in a specific place I should naturally belong to that place. If have something else please share. Rajib. 5.6.9
11 people like this
30 responses
@zandi458 (27947)
• Malaysia
5 Jun 09
This sounds complicated. I am a native of my country and live in a multi racial society of Malaysia. The citizens of Malaysia regardless of their ethnic origins are called Malaysians. I am a Malaysian, a patriotic Malaysian but I still prefer to be recognized as a Malaysian of kadazan origin. It is a subject of race and nationality. Where ever you are born and breed, the blood that runs in your body remains true to your original race.
2 people like this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Hi zandi, I would rather cut all my veins that bear my root and hurdles me from being a real human and replace with another set of blood and wherever I stay I would proudly say the sky belongs to me and the land is mine. Your feeling honored to be referred to as kadazan Malaysian is contrary to your ideals and it ignites racism and hatred thus. No Offense please.
2 people like this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi I felt I was a bit hard on your say. Yes, one is entitled to retain his/her genes and the ancestral root. This is not bad until it wears the face of fanaticism and racism. Actually what I was trying to establish was wherever I am born and brought up and been fed my loyalty should be to it and I would love to tell others that I am so and so and not so and so. I hope you got my point.
1 person likes this
@zandi458 (27947)
• Malaysia
6 Jun 09
Hi Raj, I know your style of thoughts and am an open book. So don't worry when you go against the grains of my views. We can't always be a 'yesman'. I appreciate your stance and will never be bitter about it. Since I am now some where and on borrowed computer I'll just have to go short here. Will be back in a few days and hope to go back on track with mylotting.
2 people like this
@mysdianait (65067)
• Italy
5 Jun 09
Hi Rajib! This is something which in recent years Ihave experienced and it is not easy to get it across unless you are living in the situation. I was born in UK, lived there and studied until I was 22. Then I moved to Italy where I am now. I moved here when I was young and I set up my family and my son was born here too. Now after 34 years here I 'feel' Italian and when I return to UK I do not feel I belong there anymore having been away for so many years. Things have changed in UK while I have been away and not always are these changes what I would have expected. If I had continued to live there then I probably would not have noticed them. My son is Italian and has nothing English about him at all even though he has visited and has English relations. I have both British and Italian citizenship but I use only the Italian one having lived and worked here for more than half of my life. Maybe not everyone would feel this way but I think it woud be absurd for me to say I am not happy here when I really, really am.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Hi Diana, There you are. I can well perceive your feeling for I have placed myself so many times there in your situation and therefore could start this discussion. You feel so and that is the way thing should be but that does not happen with many people. They are born and brought up in say England but their loyalty and committment is towards where their forefathers were born. Is not it disgusting. Besides I am refering to you an an English but your heart and soul is not in England but there with your forfathrs. I have never understood how one could be fostered to have such mentality.
2 people like this
@mysdianait (65067)
• Italy
5 Jun 09
The transition was not easy to accept at first either Rajib. The first years that I was here and would return to UK it would feel like going 'home' even though my home was here. Then there was a trip some years back when I realised I was not sad to leave UK and return 'home' to Italy. I felt guilty for a long time after becoming aware of this feeling but I have reasoned it out and feel that I could not honestly be happy with my feet in two shoes. Once I accepted that I feel more a part of Italy and that it would be much easier and logical to admit it, then the guilt feeling disappeared. I am happy here therefore it is also logical, in my opinion, to admit that I feel more Italian than English now
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
I hail thine spirit!!! ( a bow would follow ). ( Now serious ) Yes Diana, that is implausible. Your feeling less Italian and more English in the initial stage is normal and natural too. But over the years you have succeeded transforming yourself was what expected and now you are thoroughly an Italian and no longer an English. Ironically many people do not try or wish to feel thus.
1 person likes this
@James72 (26829)
• Australia
5 Jun 09
I can fully aprreciate your confusion about a matter such as this because I'm in an unusual position myself actually! My Father is Australian and my Mother is English, but I was born in Hong Kong! I hold both an Australian AND British passport too. To top it all off, I;m currently living and working in Egypt and have been for almost 2 years. Before this I lived and worked in India; and before India, I lived and worked throughout South East Asia. There are times that I feel completely confused about my nationalism status! The way I ultimately equate it though is by referring to myself as an Australian. I've spent the majority of my life there, so this seems reasonable to me. In the example you gave, I would refer to myself as a Canadian with an Indian heritage.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi James, Yours is a precarious situation and on your move from one place to another the question of belongingness does not arise. But as long as you are in Egypt you have to be responsible and loyal towards Egypt for you are amidst the people in there and their well being is your well being. So far your identity is of course Australian as that is the place where your sentiment and emotions are attached with. ell in the example why the suffix is there? can not I be just a Canadian? And nothing to add , nothing to subtract ?
2 people like this
@James72 (26829)
• Australia
6 Jun 09
Yes, you would be a Canadian and have every right to refer to yourself as such. It's your birthplace! We should however, be respectful of our heritage in my opinion. I have a very close friend who was born in Ontario and lived a good 35 years of his life there. His Mother and Father are Indian and have returned to just outside Delhi in retirement. My friend is a Canadian through and through, but he is forever mindful of his Indian roots and respectful of his heritage. He lives in Australia now as a permanent resident and is seeking citizenship, so he too gets to add another link to the equation now as well!
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Now there. That friend of your have no right in my view to love either in Canada or Australia. He was born and brought up in Canada and why his mind tilted towards India? Let his parents settle back in India as they are more Indians but this son is a black ship. How closed he is with his root and heritage. why can not we accept the fact that the Earth is my birth place and we all are friends. Ok your heritage question would be valid if that is required in an isolated case but if you are occupied all the while that your are an Indian this would be cheating and is against the ethics.
2 people like this
• India
5 Jun 09
Hello my friend Rajib Ji, I would only say, 'Purity lies in reality'. Let's find out. Can we call, any other livings (other tahn human-race) like wise. Let it be trees, animals, Insects, raptiles. We will always defferentiate as per their names. A snake will reamin snake all over the world same including their varieties. "Rajib' would always be an Indian as you belong to India You may do anything for taht country. My grand-daughter is US born, I claerely remmebr many instructions printed over-leaf on her birth certificate including that, She would never represent our country as Sports-woman. Like 'Kalpana chawal' and so on. I am happy as Indian born. Like Austrlians are showing their colors of racim. May God bless You and have a great time.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hello Jee, I appreciate your views but could go eye to eye on certain points. First thing human being should not be compared to any non human entity. They are amoral beings. But men are different. this is not that people were planted at different places and grew likewise. It was the quest that men began and thus got spread all over and in the process their temperament and body colour too got molded to suit the prevailing climate. Now my point is that if you are in Canada for life long or if you are born and brought up there as the second generation your loyalty and commitment has to be towards that country only. you are no longer an Indian.
2 people like this
• India
6 Jun 09
Hello my friend Rajib Ji, So nice for your frank comments. I understand, but to see evrything from my angel, one has to come longway of my age. It may be causing the difference. Now OBAMA is talking that No America without Muslims. When on ewants to compare something one must consider as Natural. It is by nature that Loyality will remain with mother. I do not say. But what you started that, it should be treated as duty. We may live and take birth anywhere , but our string will never be removed that we are not Indians. It will remain for ever. I do not say, not to be loyal. You are talking about 2nd and 3rd generations, I am giving you example of my own son and others, who go on temporary basis to US, never tolerate anything against that country. It is natural taht we have no choice for having birth at particular place. May God bless You and have a great time.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hello Jee, Yes that is the case. That your sons do not tolerate anything against America is what I am looking for. Yes the string of Indianess might remain there as we need sometime to go back to the root and there would emerge your son's being Indian. But as long as you are a citizen of a particular country and you have no obligation and responsibility towards that county is something does not get easily digested. Thank you jee.
2 people like this
@paula27661 (15898)
• Australia
5 Jun 09
Hi rajib! I am Italian because I was born in Italy, but am I? I certainly do not feel Italian because I have been living in Australia since the age of 10 and because I am ‘old’ now that means I have lived here for a long time! I had to learn English when I arrived in Australia and I felt different and out of place. Now I feel that way when I visit Italy and English has become my first language; I think in English, I dream in English and I sure prefer writing in English! My sister on the other hand was born here and does not have any Italian traits whatsoever and speaks Italian with a definite foreign accent although had she been born in Italy she would still be the same person would she not? In my opinion your nationality is where your heart is and where you have spent most of your life at. Your cultural background is developed where you grew up and in my view I am Australian with Italian origin because I do not feel as a native there as much as I do here despite what my birth certificate says and by the way my passport is Australian. Great discussion idea!
1 person likes this
@mysdianait (65067)
• Italy
5 Jun 09
Hi Paula! Reading your response makes me feel less guilty. It's not an easy situation to explain to those who have not been through it but your situation is the same as mine and I can see that you feel too that you 'belong' where you have made your roots.
2 people like this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Hi Paula, Yes, I too believe in that concept. Now as you are in Australia and you have been molded and shaped with its culture and language you should think no more of what Italy would have supplied you with. But what about those Italians here in Australia who would throw partis when Italy would emerge vicorious in the soccer championship over Australia? The same question to Diana too that how would she take on the issue that when England beats Italy the Italians ( with English root )cheer for England? Is not it cheating? Thanks Paula.
3 people like this
@mysdianait (65067)
• Italy
5 Jun 09
In the first years that I was here I cheered for England but that is not the case now. I cheer for Italy - but that has also something to do with how football has changed over the years and is not entirely due to the fact that I feel more Italian (though Italian players are certainly worth cheering! )
2 people like this
@rosdimy (3936)
• Malaysia
5 Jun 09
Second or later generations should in general be referred to by the country theyy were born in. This is logical because the person does not know any other country. If the person is fanatical about race and country of origin then it is a different story. In my country the races are referred to as Malaysian Malay, Malaysian Chinese, Malaysian Indian, or whatever. Notice the country comes first. Due to the system religion is mentioned before the race as in Malaysian Muslim Malay. Nevertheless there are those who put religion first. Country still comes before race. all the best, rosdimy
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Hi rosdimy, Nicely expressed. The same system is there in here too. And you got my point on the generation issue. When this second or third generation the root nationality does not count or should not be counted. Suppose I am an Indian and I am born and brought up in Malaysia and in this case I should be treated as a pure Malaysian without the prefixes for I know not India nor India has done anything to my person and my development. Thank you friend.
1 person likes this
@rosdimy (3936)
• Malaysia
5 Jun 09
Sometimes we make the distinction of racial origin to stress on the mixed society in the country. Furthermore due to many mised marriages the features of many Malaysians tend to confuse some people, even among the population. We identify ourselves to a certain race based on the culture practised. The sad thing is currently there are people trying to stir things up by highlighting only parts of certain events and/or parts of certain regulations. Hence the stress on OneMalaysia, whereby the country comes first.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Yes, you are on the dots. This is the vested interested people behind that are not allowing a peaceful amalgamation. Is not this a very sensible issue? Thanks for the add.
1 person likes this
@tjades (3591)
• Jamaica
6 Jun 09
Hi Krajibg... My take on this..... We are all born with what can be referred to as dual identity. That is our race and our nation of birth and/or adoption. You are an Idian by race but a Canadian by birth. Black people living in the Us are called African-American even though many come from nations other than Africa. A caucasian is a caucasian inspite of his country of birth. The same is true of a Chinese. I think it all adds to the variety of life and helps to make life far more colourful and interesting. We are like the beautiful scenery on a tapestry. Each race and nation adds to the overall character of the scenery. We all respond differently to the situation you highlighted in your discussion. There is an aunt of mine who resides in England for many many years now and considers herself more British than Jamaican (much to my annoyance as she is always comparing BLAH ). I dont want to be British or American or even Canadian. I want to be Jamaican even if I have to live in another country. I love my roots. There are other family members who have also been away for many many years but are very Jamaican and want to hold on to that identity no matter what. There are also cousins who like you are born Canadian but are proud to be identified with their Jamaican heritage/lineage. It just depends on how you feel about the issue. Here in Jamaica Indians may be reffered to as Jamaican Indians (if theres need for a disntinction) and chinese are Jamaican Chinese etc... Our Motto says "Out Of Many, One People" and that is reflected in the tapestry of the Jamaican culture.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
hi tjades, with all respect to your person I would go against your view. What your Aunt is expressing should be the real spirit. The land the air the food wherever you get for survival you have to acknowledge and remain obliged to. About root. What will you do with your root? are they God given links? can not you say your identity as a man only? If i am born in Canada and brought up there my duty should be to feel myself Canadian and not Indian. I appreciate your Jamaican Aunt.
1 person likes this
@tjades (3591)
• Jamaica
7 Jun 09
Hi krajibg ... It is good when we have opposing views and can discuss them while maintaining our individual stance. In relaation to your point about ones roots possibly not being God given (if I understood you correctly).... Our roots are most definately God given just as our skin colour, and other physical features are God given. I believe that if we should all leave our birth country (as in the case of my aunt whom you say you agree with), and take on the ways and customs of our adoptive country while forsaking our own natural land of birth, it would be a very sad practice. It is really not practical either. As I mentioned before though we will all respond differently to this situation. Some will hold dearly to the ways and customs of their ancestry, while some not so dearly, but most will in some way or the other adopt some of the practices of their adoptive home. For you a Canadian born Indian the ways and customs of your race may not be of as much significance as to those who left India to seek a better life in another land. There are many many Indians living here in Jamaica. Some adhere to the customs of their homeland and go back and marry the person selected for them but there are those who want nothing more to do with Idia and are quite happy to build their lives else where. That will by no means change the fact that they are Indians and that their offspring(s) will be Indians. Some Indians here are still keen on Hinduism and pass on the practices to their children, while some wouldnt care less if that religion still existed. I have heard of Indians who hate the fact that they are Indians and there are those who are very pround to be Indians. It just depends on how we respond to the situation. I can tell you this much... The interminglingand sharing of cultures between the various races here have added to the richness of the Jamaican culture. During our Independence celebrations aspects of all the individual cultures are highlighted such as dress and ways of preparing food, songs and dances. It is a spendid array of the ways of life of different cultures coming together to make one. If the Indian, Chinese, and all other peoples had come here and forgotten their roots and culture then we would not be able to enjoy all this. The same is the true for the US, Canada and England (just to name three major countries). There is a very rich and thriving Jamaican culture in these countries as well as Indian and Chinese cultures. People in general cant just up and forget their roots. A few ( as in the case of you and my aunt) may choose to do so but difinatly not the majority. My aunt by the way becomes a full fledged jamaican whenever our country features positively and in a big way on the world scene. More like a band waggonist if you ask me. But for me it means that no matter what she says or does... She cant just put her Jamaican roots behind her. My nieces nephews and cousins who were born in the US, Canada and England are all proud of their Jamaican roots even though some have only been here once or twice. They are also very proud of their birth right nationality.
@celticeagle (123975)
• Boise, Idaho
5 Jun 09
I think if you want to be perceived as a Canadian and not so much as a Indian person you need to act more Canadian. I think people see you as Indian because you look more that way. Look more Canadian. Just my opinion but I think people see what they want to see and if you look a certain way people will see you that way. I guess it is up to you to take on this more than the other. Good luck in this indeavor.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi celti, This is not an autobiographical account but a hypothesis. Now, well as I was born and brought up there and feel myself out and out a Canadian why would not I be one like others there? My skin colour might differ but I am Canadian and I have no obligation towards India whatsoever. I feel in such case even the native of Canada must recognise my being a Canadian. What say?
1 person likes this
@celticeagle (123975)
• Boise, Idaho
6 Jun 09
You obviously don't look Canadian or you would be though of as such. You have the Indian characteristics so that is how people percieve you.
• India
5 Jun 09
You are Indo-Canadian, I guess! One thing is, one cannot deny the roots or the genes. You should of course have full loyalty towards Canada...that country has nurtured your people for so many years and you should feel proud and belonged but your Indianess will scream out for recognition too! Your name, your complexion, your food habits, your language...you cannot deny the fact that your forefathers came from India and you should not either. In my opinion, if you can manage both your identities maturedly, you can become a proud Indo-Canadian, without the need to deny any of your identities.
1 person likes this
• India
6 Jun 09
amio tai Bangladeshis I think have a huge identity crisis. If you know, the mukti juddha was about liberation from Pakistan because of Bengali identity. at that time there were many Bangladeshis who fought the mukti bahini i.e. they were actually traitors...they wanted to remain with Pakistan and continue with that identity. But I beleive most Bangladeshis want their Bangla identity, as seen with the results of the recent elections. So maybe the immigrants you talk of, still have their hearts and dreams with Pakistan...in any case, the north-east of India has sadly been allowed to become a free for all, esp. for illegal immigrants, and for trouble-mongers.
@JenInTN (27546)
• United States
5 Jun 09
I think that this is a question that haunts a lot of people. Although they are born in a place they may be very loyal to..they also have roots in another. This can be confusing. I think that one should be considered in the nationality they are born but if I were born in another country..I may still not be accepted as being one of them.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
5 Jun 09
Hi Jen, Why , why, why, all the time we are talking of the root and polluting the world. If you can capitulate the world as a small village why the root? My root is Indian and if I am third and fourth generation in your country why not I belong to that country and let me embrace this as mine? I know not my root nor I am interested in locating my root I am well of there and why do you vex me when even I am working as a Government servant there? Let me belong to please.
1 person likes this
@JenInTN (27546)
• United States
6 Jun 09
I don't know why it is my friend..I would love for it to be an accpeting world. If it were up to me..we would all belong wherever we laid our heads that night. Take care.
@reckon21 (3484)
• Philippines
8 Jun 09
You have two great nation under your feet. You are a Canadian and Indian at the same time. Many people had the same experience with you. The important thing is that you knew where your heart belongs to.
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
8 Jun 09
Hi reckon, Nicely put. And that should be the actual spirit. Where your heart is the land you belong to. Thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
@ketybhagat (4125)
• India
8 Jun 09
I think if your are born and bread in a particular country but left it ages ago and set up life elsewhere, then you naturally will have more love and affection for the country of living rather than origin. It is only natural, for this country where you are residing now has given you everythig from a job, house and family and of course citizenship. why then should you be labeled as anything other than a citizen of that country. Oh you may have some feeling for your country of birth, but thats another matter. If your forefathers came and settled here and you were born here, then most certainly, your loyalites will lie with this country and you must be called a citizen of that country and not any else. Have I confused you ??
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
8 Jun 09
No, You have rather cleared it for others who are confused and went rambling. What you have said is not the case with all. Well, I have been born and brought up in Canada and my heart goes with the well being if this country and India is mere like any other nation for me I am like any native Canadian. Are not I? This way I show my loyalty to this country too. but there are Immigrants from Bangladesh and most of them are treated as Indian but when Pakistan or Bangladesh beat India in Cricket why they cheer for them and not for India? Thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
@sandymay48 (2031)
• Canada
6 Jun 09
Hi rajib...How are you? For me that is an easy question but ofcourse, its only my opinion. Thinking about the example you gave of an Indian being born in Canada but having Indian roots back somewhere...I would simply say they are Canadian but of Indian descent. That is my proper way of saying it. But who says Im right Whatever country you are born and living in, is what you are but you can be of different descent.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
8 Jun 09
Hi Sands, I am fine, thank you. how is you? Yes, that could be the case as naturally human being settled in various parts of the planet and due to climatic reason they develop deferment colour and height and complexion and mentality and all. Now they are in the gene and roots and therefore there is no offence if somebody in the course of our discussion referred me as of Indian descent. And the issue should end there only and you can not treat me as Indian as India is a foreign land for me and Canada is my motherland or whatsoever. Thanks a lot.
1 person likes this
@pillusch (1148)
• Mexico
6 Jun 09
In my humble opinion, it doesn’t really matter how you feel about it. If both your parents are Indians, then you’re an Indian, no matter where you were born. It’s a questions of the genes your parents carry and pass on to you. And, beyond that, certain idiosyncrasies and archetypes that you carry as an Indian, which are different from, let’s say, a German’s. How you identify yourself is another matter, and that might change over time, anyway.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
8 Jun 09
Hi, You have a valid point but my say was even if my parents are Indian and now settled permanently in Canada would not I be second generation there and should not I feel all Canadian? Or I should be all loyal to India that I have never been to and for me a foreign country. Do you still prescribe me to an Indian? Thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
@loudcry (1044)
• India
6 Jun 09
People are obssesed with categorising each other. It could be on the basis of religion, caste , nationality and so on. For instance, in India, getting asked about one's religion and caste is commonplace. I am an atheist, and thats what call myself when somebody asks me about my religion. But, this answer does not suffice, they will prod further and ask my parent's religion!So, there is a tendency in the human species to classify people. As for your problem, which I understand is being labelled as Indian, I suggest you reconcile with the fact that people will ask you about your originality no matter what. Nobody can escape this, even President Barack Obama had to address the issue of his muslim middle name. If you dont mind my prodding, I sense that you experience some disconfiture on being called an Indian. Does this affect your life in anyway? Just trying to understand.
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi loudcry, Its a nice picture of Indian lives you have upheld. But do not you think it all absurd. Now we can not blame them for they were brooded that way but what the new generation doing? I see them not so much different in this case. There is still the root sentiment. But why it it necessary? When you go to the States and settle there procuring citizenship you are now an American citizen and by default you should be all loyal to that country. There if you still cry over your being Indian it would be ridiculous. thanks for the response.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jun 09
Rajib- I think this question has several layers and really depends a great deal upon definitions and meanings. I refer to myself as an American because that is where I was born, though through study I've come to find out that my ancestors were Cherokee (a native american tribe here in the US), as well as married into the McGregor clan of Scotland before immigration on my father's side, and the other half on his side can trace their line back to England. My mother's side immigrated from Austria and Poland, and with the number of name changes very well may have been Jewish but no one talks about it. Though I have learned from those roots, and have taken the time to meet with the grandmothers and learn about Wolf Medicine, I still am not officially a part of the tribe because they stopped giving out tribal cards. To me it doesn't matter if it is "official", I know my ancestory and I am still following part of my tribal ways. However, I honor my father's side by attending Scottish events, and teaching our son about the McGregor clan, as well as his ancestors from England. I also have taught them about their great great grandmother who wrote letters from the old country as she called it that I now have in possession that give us a clue to her upbringing. They are still American, but they are learning. My husband is Norweigian and German with his ancestory. He is teaching our son German, and they go as Vikings each year for the Renn Fest celebrating his side of the ancestory. And he's very insistant on it being historically accurate so I've made all of their costumes, save their head pieces which we bought last year. I think you need to be true to who you are. If you are Indian, and that is your culture, your ancestory and you hold with the values of being Indian then those are the things you'd take with you regardless of where you live. I spent time with a friend in high school who was Indian (India) and her family was very traditional. I don't think I ever saw her mother or herself out of a Sari ever. During our biology class she was excused from dissection, so she was my partner and I did it all (though I don't like cutting things up either and am glad we now have computer programs for this sort of thing). She was even in an arranged marriage to a doctor back in India, though she was raised in the US. I lost touch with her when I moved, but I remember her fondly because she knew who she was, what her culture was, and she didn't change it just because she was here in the US. Namaste-Anora
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi Anora, Yours is more complicated and complex case. In such situation when you try to go back to your root or genes which would or should be considered true. With this perspective I had posted that discussion and wanted all who are not 'actually' native of the land but have been there for generation should feel belonging to that land only and if tilted towards his/her original it would be disloyalty. Nice points.
2 people like this
@abanerji (1026)
• India
5 Jun 09
hi dada you are right in saying that one should belong to the place where one is born. more specifically where one is brought up. i stress more on 'brought up' because i was born in a different state and have been brought up in a different state. well, i am a native of a different state altogether. i speak my mother tongue, but still i belong to the state. i am more like people here than in my native place or my birth place. i am comfortble with their dialect, their cultures, their eating habits etc. i feel at home and feel attached.
1 person likes this
@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi Sis, That is the point. Now here in India we are different on race, caste, creed, language and culture but this does not mean that when I would go abroad I would say I am as Assamese. Or a Tamil. This is the narrowest of all sentiment. We proudly should say 'Indian". As your tail is tied with Bengali background but you as a single and emancipated individual feel belonging to the place where you are and where you had been fed and the culture and system helped you out to grow this much today. In such situation if you carry along the Bengaliness it would mar your self and also the job. And if a Canadian is born and brought up herein India and settled permanently he/she should feel and BE an Indian. He is a cut piece of Canada. Only for lab use his Canadian origine might be looked for. Thanks for the response.
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@dawnald (84078)
• Shingle Springs, California
5 Jun 09
I am an American of Polish, German, English and Russian Jewish ancestry. I guess I'm just confused.
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@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Hi dawn , You are more than complicated now. And samples are to be sent to the lab. lol
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• Indonesia
5 Jun 09
I jus want to tell you...which nationality that you really love and enjoyed??so is answer
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@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
Come to the point. the answer is not possible this way.
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@shibham (17019)
• India
5 Jun 09
hi krajibg, it is as like as our mother and step-mother. mother give birth us and in absence of her, step mother look after us. but can we compare them to each other. if i am born in india then i am an indian, may be i shifted to separate country on second day of birth. in this case india is my mother and second country is my step-mother. i shall be well known as an indian. yes, say if i live in italy then my next generation will be italian.thanks.
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@krajibg (11934)
• Guwahati, India
6 Jun 09
My point is straight. If you are from Bangladesh or any other place and you are second or third generation here in India your loyalty and duty should be towards this country not to where you were born. And you know the immigrants Bangladeshi staying near your house cheering for Pakistan and Bangladesh when they beat India in Cricket. It is your loyalty? Thanks for the response.
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