What is your favourite wild animal?

Australia
November 14, 2006 6:27pm CST
i have 2....tiger and wolf
1 person likes this
13 responses
@maferick (1582)
• Brazil
21 Jan 07
i like tigers too,but my favorites are the wolfs and the panthers,i love those eyes the way they look..are hipnotic..
• Australia
21 Jan 07
i think the wild cats and wolves both have hypnotic eyes...thanks everyone for responses
@anup_cfa (899)
• India
22 Nov 06
its elephant...with white teeth - its elephant...with white teeth
its elephant...with white teeth
• Australia
22 Nov 06
my grandma loves elephants too thanks for your response
@Janglles (83)
• Australia
17 Nov 06
i like meercats
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• Australia
19 Nov 06
meerkats are soooo cute too ok i must admit i love most animals LOL
@aureliaz (1178)
• Singapore
16 Nov 06
Gazelle, deer or polar bear
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• Australia
17 Nov 06
lovely :)
@lumina83 (131)
• France
22 Jan 07
turtles... oftenly unknown, but intelligent and amazing animals...
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@ronita34 (3923)
• Canada
22 Jan 07
I would have to say that mine would be a Lion they are such beautiful creatures. yet they can be the most visciously fierce creature to walk the jungle. Which is why he is King!!
1 person likes this
@cyfernet (2384)
• United States
21 Jan 07
i like Tiger. they really look like a premium animal than any other animal in this world well as for danger they are dangerous among all the animals along with the lion!
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@laysha21 (212)
• Romania
21 Jan 07
i like very much Black Pantera and Bengal Tiger...like very much the felines..:)
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• Australia
22 Nov 06
i also have 2 meerkat and DEAS feral cat
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• Australia
22 Nov 06
giraffe
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@ossie16d (11825)
• Australia
22 Nov 06
It would be the emu, and although not wild in the usual sense of being vicious the emu is interesting. The only country where emus are found naturally is Australia and it lives throughout the continent, ranging from coastal regions to high in the Snowy Mountains. The emu is rarely found in rainforest or very arid areas. At one time they were found in Tasmania but sadly were exterminated soon after Europeans arrived. Two dwarf species of emus that lived on Kangaroo Island and King Island also became extinct. Today, Emus are not found in heavily populated regions, in particular along the east coast. Despite this loss in some areas, Emu numbers may have increased since European settlement. The provision of water for domestic stock, together with the Emu's ability to reproduce rapidly, has favoured its survival. It is estimated that the Emu population is 625,000-725,000, with 100,000-200,000 in Western Australia and the majority of remaining populations in New South Wales and Queensland. Emus eat fruits, seeds, growing shoots of plants, insects, other small animals, and animal droppings. They move within their range according to climatic conditions. If sufficient food/water is present they will stay in one area. Where these resources are more variable, Emus move as needed, and can move hundreds of kilometres, sometimes at rates of 15-25km per day. Most people see Emus along roadsides, near fences or other barriers, giving the impression of close association. However, Emus are not really sociable, except for young birds, which stay with their father. Their calls consist of booming, drumming and grunting. Booming is created in an inflatable neck sac, and can be heard up to 2km away. Emus nest in winter and the male and female stay together for about about five months, which includes courtship, nest building and egg-laying. The female lays 5-15 eggs, measuring 130x90mm, are laid at intervals of 2-4 days. These are dark bluish-green when fresh, becoming lighter with exposure to the sun. The shells are thick, with paler green and white layers under the dark outer layer. The female dominates the male during pair formation but once incubation begins, the male becomes aggressive to other Emus, including his mate. The female wanders away and leaves the male to perform all the incubation. Sometimes she will find another mate and breed again. The male sits on the nest for 55 days without drinking, feeding, defecating or leaving the nest. During this time, eggs often roll out of the nest and are pulled back in by the male. Newly hatched chicks are cream-coloured with dark brown stripes. They leave the nest at 2-7 days when they are able to feed themselves. Young birds stay close together and remain with the male for four months, finally leaving at about 6 months. During this period, the stripes fade and the downy plumage is replaced by dull brown feathers. Emus are nearly fully grown at one year, and may breed at 20 months. The emu eggshells of infertile eggs, are suitable for carving. Sun-bleached eggs are generally those that have not hatched and are left in the nest after the male and young have left. Bleaching takes about three months.
@macubx (11419)
• Philippines
17 Nov 06
Tiger
@Bunny2 (2102)
• Australia
17 Nov 06
I love tigers too :)
1 person likes this