"Your Call May Be Monitored or Recorded for Quality Assurance"

@Jshean20 (14349)
Canada
September 26, 2012 9:54pm CST
For those of you who have ever called into a call centre and wondered if the following phrase is true: "Your Call May Be Monitored or Recorded for Quality Assurance"- I can tell you that it is. I work in a call centre and calls are definately recorded and representatives that you speak with are constantly being listened to and having their calls picked apart for silly little things. There is actually a marking scheme set up, so if you ever feel like the representative is saying something that seems strange, it's probably because they are working hard to get a good mark on their call. Part of the call quality expectation is to show empathy and offer an apology on every call, most calls it's easy to do this but some calls an apology seems inappropriate so it sounds odd apologising to a customer when it's not fitting. Have you ever called into a call centre and been shocked with how you were talked to? Was it in a good way or bad way? Your thoughts?
1 person likes this
7 responses
@dpk262006 (58673)
• Delhi, India
27 Sep 12
Hi Js! I have heard this phrase umpteen number of times. I can understand the pressure on the other side. As a customer, am concerned about my own grievance, without even bothering how many customers the Executive at the other end of the line is needed to attend and convince in a day. I find that some Executives are very helpful and they go out of the way to help you and some are inexperienced and do not even understand your grievance and I have felt that one some of them are not able to help, they even disconnect the call knowing that next time if am going to call, I'll be connected to another 'Executive' not him/her.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
28 Sep 12
With a lot of companies though, when the agent disconnects the call it will be trackable assuming they got as far as to pull up your account. With the company I work for, as soon as you open up their account your name shows up as a "foot print" so you can't really hide or even fake your name.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
29 Sep 12
That makes sense. A lot of people tend to forget their reason for calling in when dealing with an unpleasant employee, they end up spending more time trying to get the agent into trouble than they do trying to resolve their issue.
@dpk262006 (58673)
• Delhi, India
28 Sep 12
I understand your point,thanks for the information. However, as a consumer I will be much concerned about redressal of my grievance rather than finding out the precious 'Executive' who disconnected my call.
@kingparker (9673)
• United States
28 Sep 12
Mostly, I called into a call center, either to check the balance, or need some help from the representatives. Some really helpful, some might provide routine guidance to guide me through the process. I didn't have much complaint though, and I don't see anything strange about the call center personnel's conversation. If they talk strange to me, I might as well let it go, or demand to speak to their superior.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
28 Sep 12
When you ask to speak with a "supervisor", keep in mind that often in call centres supervisors are regular reps who sit in the same desks as all the other agents. They usually undergo training for under 2 hours and they are there to make it look like they are in control of the staff when in reality they are not, they are just another voice. Those who manage the staff very rarely ever take the phone calls.
@celticeagle (156425)
• Boise, Idaho
27 Sep 12
Yes, I have worked in a call centre before. They will record several of a reps calls to discuss with them later on. I think if you think of the apology as having to do with good manners it may help. I have taught my grandson that anytime someone does something nice for you you need to say I am sorry. If you think about it the opposite would hold true also. Each time a person has to call in to a call centre they deserve an apology because the good service has broken down somewhere. I have had some strange experiences with call centers. Usually it has always been good experiences I have had. But it helps to know what is going on on the other side of the phone too.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
28 Sep 12
That's good that for the most part you've had positive experiences with call centres. The hardest part of working in one, is that often a customer has totally lost trust because of the bad experiences they've had with previous reps they have talked to.
@Raine38 (12258)
• United States
27 Sep 12
I can relate on the apologizing part. I called the hotline of a particular internet service provider, and let me tell you it is so frustrating. The agent spent more time apologizing and making excuses rather than answering my questions. Each statement of hers was preceded with her apologies. I have to bite my tongue from ripping her head off and just answer my questions.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
28 Sep 12
I'm sure in your head you were just thinking about how fake the person sounded, well I can tell you that the agent was probably more concerned about getting a good score on the call rather than resolving your issue. Customers read right through fakeness and over apologizing is just offensive.
@Raine38 (12258)
• United States
27 Sep 12
I can relate on the apologizing part. I called the hotline of a particular internet service provider, and let me tell you it is so frustrating. The agent spent more time apologizing and making excuses rather than answering my questions. Each statement of hers was preceded with her apologies. I have to bite my tongue from ripping her head off and just answer my questions.
• United States
28 Sep 12
I regularly have to call customer service. I often get irriatated and end up being no so nice because I feel like they are fake nice.
@Jshean20 (14349)
• Canada
28 Sep 12
I think it's easy to tell the difference between someone who is being genuinely nice verses fake. I try talking to the person like I would anyone else, I don't suck up or apologize a million times. I keep it real, get to the point, solve the problem and respect the customer and they seem to appreciate it.
@Raine38 (12258)
• United States
27 Sep 12
I can relate on the apologizing part. I called the hotline of a particular internet service provider, and let me tell you it is so frustrating. The agent spent more time apologizing and making excuses rather than answering my questions. Each statement of hers was preceded with her apologies. I have to bite my tongue from ripping her head off and just answer my questions.