What is ASMR?

By Kade
Los Angeles, California
January 16, 2022 8:55pm CST
I didn't realize my previous post about it would spark so many questions, lol. So ASMR stands for autonomous sensory meridian response. It's basically a sensory response to stimuli (typically auditory) that gives you this kind of tingly feeling in your brain and it kind of moves down your body. Not in a scary way, but in a relaxing sort of way. The most common tingle triggers you'll see in ASMR videos consist of tapping on things, scratching, brushing out different fibers, writing or drawing, page turning, eating, and low whispers. Everyone responds to these things differently so in order for it to work you have to just try out the different sounds/videos and see what works best for you. The reason you'll see these as videos more often than just sound bites is because there's a little bit of visual stimuli in there too. If you're more of a visual or tactile learner, odds are that the sounds alone may not set you off. I have to see it myself. A lot of times I don't even need the sound. If I see a person reading three seats in front of me on the train, for instance, just the visual of watching them turn the pages will set off my tingles. It's relaxing for me. ASMR first became popular in Korea where a creator there made the very first ASMR-only channel. It got huge and spread around the country pretty quickly. I discovered it myself watching some of the boys in my favorite KPOP (Korean pop music) band at the time doing their own version of an ASMR video. It's gotten more worldly popular since then. If you plug in ASMR on YouTube or whatever video service your country uses I'm sure you'll come up with hundreds or even thousands of available videos. I'd definitely recommend checking them out. Don't rule it out if you listen to one video and you hate it; it just means that's not your trigger. Try different things and you're sure to hit on something that sparks those tingles!
5 people like this
3 responses
@Bensen32 (26658)
• United States
19 Jan 22
I watch a few of these videos and I must be missing something. I do not get what the big deal is about the videos.
@Bensen32 (26658)
• United States
19 Jan 22
@akruser13 oh alright I guess to each their own
1 person likes this
• Los Angeles, California
19 Jan 22
I think it can be exciting for people if they've never experienced the sensation before. The first time you get the tingling thing going on it can be weird and it's like doing a science experiment over and over until you finally get it to work, and then you're almost caught off guard by it because you were skeptical all along. But after that initial "oh! it DOES work!" moment I wouldn't exactly say it's exciting. You either lose interest or you realize it's an effective tool for you and it becomes sort of part of your mundane routine. They aren't something I watch for fun or anything, I put them on to help me sleep and usually I pass out within the first ten minutes of them playing. Sort of like how people will turn on a fan or a white noise generator to help lull them into sleep. They're more like a meditation or relaxation tool, not something made to be watched just for the sake of watching.
1 person likes this
@sharonelton (15801)
• Lichfield, England
17 Jan 22
I'd never heard of this before. It sounds really interesting.
• Los Angeles, California
17 Jan 22
It's interesting going through and trying to figure out what triggers you in a good or bad way. Sometimes I'll try something out that I haven't heard before and immediately turn it off! It's crazy how some things will sound like nails on a chalkboard to one person but be another person's relaxing sounds.
1 person likes this
@sharonelton (15801)
• Lichfield, England
18 Jan 22
@akruser13 Yes, different people like different things.
@Genipher (5408)
• United States
18 Jan 22
Would this help with an anxiety attack?
• Los Angeles, California
18 Jan 22
I would think it would. I do actually suffer from social anxiety and that's part of why my brain is so busy at night. It has a tendency to reply events of the day and things I said or did where I wish I could've redone it better. The videos help me focus on something else so I get myself out of those loops.
1 person likes this