What is 'hamburger'?

@owlwings (43284)
Cambridge, England
December 16, 2006 7:53pm CST
I have often noticed questions such as 'What can I do with hamburger?' which greatly puzzle me! I think this is an American term. In the UK hamburgers are already made into patties ready to grill or barbecue. When people refer to 'hamburger in the freezer' it seems that they mean what I call minced or ground beef. Is the US "hamburger" pure ground beef or is it already mixed with onion, rusk (i.e. bread) and spices? What quality of ground beef is it and how much fat would you expect it to contain?
5 people like this
32 responses
• Canada
17 Dec 06
hamburger meat in North America is ground beef. The terms are interchangeable. As for the content: beef: 63% fat: 29% rodent by-products: 6% mad-cow: 2%
4 people like this
@caribe (2465)
• United States
17 Dec 06
Funny! :)
2 people like this
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
You forgot the essential flavouring - 1% cockroach!
2 people like this
@Shinji (48)
• Brazil
18 Dec 06
Hahahaha! The best answer, ever!
1 person likes this
@blueman (16513)
• India
17 Dec 06
whatever the terms means, i love to have both, and i think most people would love to have it.
3 people like this
@rebelann (78192)
• El Paso, Texas
26 Dec
I thought cows were sacred in India??
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Dec 06
i think people also mean the ground meat BEFORE it is patties
3 people like this
• United States
17 Dec 06
HOLY CRAP! IS THAT FOR REAL!?!?! cockroach and nuclear waste spores???!!?? i better stop going to mcdolnald but tell me thr truth... cockroach?!?!?
2 people like this
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
Oh now! There's nothing wrong with a crunchy bit of cockroach! After all, locusts are a delicacy in Egypt, along with fried bumble bees. Wichiti grubs are adored in parts of Australia (and eaten raw). Why not cockroach? After all, in a hamburger factory, all they have fed on is raw hamburger that dropped down the back of the machine, so they are quite pure!
2 people like this
@rebelann (78192)
• El Paso, Texas
26 Dec
Ahhh, so that's where they got the idea for klingons @owlwings
1 person likes this
@198112 (335)
• United States
17 Dec 06
cheeseburger, The real deal - picture of a 8 stack cheese burger
In the States a hamburger can come in different varities. Already seasoned, stuffed with cheese. From my knowledge a US hamburger is ground beef USDA approved. But some burgers come in chicken, turkey, veggie, soy, so a burger depends on the person and what they like. A burger to me is a double cheeseburger from Mickey D's. Thats all the beef I need. What's a burger to you?
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
Of course, I do understand what a burger is (it can be almost any cooked meat or quorn formed into a flat cake, grilled or fried and served hot in a bun with the addition of various sauces, pickles and salads and sometimes a slice of cheese). I have often seen 'hamburger' referred to (as in 'I have 5lbs of hamburger in the freezer') as opposed to 'a hamburger' or '5lbs of hamburgers'.
1 person likes this
• Pakistan
17 Dec 06
Of course... You R Right...(Y)
1 person likes this
@Khangura (924)
• Canada
17 Dec 06
hamburger is a sandwich (in the United States, United Kingdom, South Africa and Saudi Arabia, the patty alone is known as a beefburger or burger) that consists of a patty of ground meat that is usually beef. The meat can be grilled, fried, steamed, or broiled, and is generally served with various condiments and toppings inside a bun baked specially for this purpose. Burgers are often served with french fries, potato chips, or onion rings. Hamburger can also refer to the meat itself. This type of meat can be used in boxed dinners such as "Hamburger Helper". Hamburger is actually a distinct product from ground round and other types of ground meat. However, ground beef of any form is often commonly referred to as "hamburger." A recipe calling for 'hamburger' (the non-countable noun) would require ground beef or beef substitute- not a whole sandwich.
2 people like this
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
A very knowledgeable and descriptive answer!
1 person likes this
@yorb24 (2180)
• United States
17 Dec 06
Ground beef. We have patties here too. I don't think people use them as often. It's pure, not mixed with anything.
@getnbuy (1314)
• United States
17 Dec 06
In the US hamburger is referred to as ground beef. And , yes, we make hamburgers out of it, among other things. It does not come with anything added, except the cheap kind has tripe. (Yuck) You can buy different grades and different fat content. I always buy 98% fat free.
@caribe (2465)
• United States
17 Dec 06
Hamburger meat refers to ground beef and there are different grades of fat content. It doesn't normally come already mixed with onion and spices in the USA. In Nicaragua, where I live now, it sometimes comes mixed already but I prefer to buy a piece of beef and have it ground while I wait for it. It is fresher that way and I can see what I am getting for sure. When you have it stored in your freezer it might be in one pound or bigger packages or some people have it made into patties before freezing.
@nancygibson (3736)
• France
17 Dec 06
Its so wierd, ham is pork so isn't hamburger minced pork meat? In the uk we talk about minced beef or beefburgers, ground meat is much finer, almost more like pate in consistency
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
No. It has nothing to do with ham (the meat). It is named after the German town of Hamburg whose speciality was a patty or cake of compressed, minced meat. In the States it seems that the word has extended to mean the minced/ground meat from which Hamburgers are made. The words 'burger', 'beefburger', 'cheeseburger' and so on are really misconstructions based on the idea that the original had something to do with ham!
1 person likes this
@chiyosan (30213)
• Philippines
17 Dec 06
oh so it is ground beef??? i really thought it was a pattie. i even responded to it making a hamburger steak! hehe
1 person likes this
@owlwings (43284)
• Cambridge, England
17 Dec 06
What would a pattie be except compressed ground/minced meat?
1 person likes this
@rebelann (78192)
• El Paso, Texas
26 Dec
I see what you mean. I'm sure by now you already know that what we here in the colonies call hamburger is just plain ole meat. The problem I have with a lot of it is that they always remove the fats so it's lean which to me is not healthy .... I'm not arguing about what other people prefer, I prefer ground beef that hasn't been tampered with.
1 person likes this
• Malaysia
17 Dec 06
how it taste???
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Dec
Yep, as others have said it is an interchangeable term. I don't know where in the US it is more prevalent, but I do know that I personally say "hamburger" a lot to mean ground beef.
• United States
27 Jan 07
A hamburger in the USA, just means ground beef . It can be fried or grilled. It can be beef or baffalo. It can be mixed with egg, onion, spices, or just all meat. The fat content depends on the chopped meet. They have chuck with 36 % fat. They have sirlon, with only 12 % fat.
@marrry (341)
• Romania
21 Dec 06
hamburger - my favorite!!!!!muaaa!!!
a hamburger is ground meat, usually beef, shaped into large patties, and sautéed, broiled or grilled. Also the ground meat used loose in other dishes.
• Canada
18 Dec 06
I'm in Canada and here "hamburger" either means a patty that's ready to cook, or ground beef. I don't know of anywhere here that has it premixed with anything, it's just plain old ground beef that we got used to call hamburger. I think it was originally called hamburger meat, which was then shorten to suit lazy people.
@psyclone (244)
• Romania
17 Dec 06
Hamburgers must have started somewhere, and perhaps you will say they started in Hamburg -- Hamburg, Germany, that is, and you would be only partly right. It is said that the Hamburgers (folks that lived in Hamburg) got the idea to tenderize beef from the Tartars several centuries back, and they would eat it either raw, the way theTartars did (Beef Tartare, get it?), or cook it with onions. An English doctor and food enthusiast adapted the dish as part of his beef-three-times-a-day food regimen. His name was Dr. J.H. Salisbury; hence Salisbury Steak. With the wave of German immigrants to the United States in the 1800's the word "Hamburg Steak" or "hamburger" began appearing on menus, but they always referred to ground beef patties served on a plate -- no bun, no pickles, no mustard, no lettuce, no mayo. To serve the "hamburger" as a sandwich, well, somebody had to think that up, or rather, cook that up. As in most things American, there is a diversity of opinion between the northeast and the southwest, with still another opinion coming from the midwest. In the northeast, they say that the burger was first grilled by Louis Lassen of New Haven, Connecticut who ground up some scraps of beef and served it as a sandwich to a customer who was in a hurry in 1900. In Athens,Texas, they say a man named Fletcher Davis fried a beef patty and put it between two slices of bread as a sandwich in the late 1880's and took it to the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis. However, there is some evidence to support the theory that the hamburger got its start at the World's Columbia Exposition in 1893 in Chicago. Other midwesterners claim that Charlie Nagreen of Seymour, Wisconsin invented it in 1885, introducing it at the Outagamie County Fair. Most historians seem to agree that the popularization of the Hamburger as we know it today, was when Fletch Davis began selling the ground beef patty sandwich at the amusement area, known as The Pike at the St. Louis World's Fair Louisiana Purchase Exhibition in 1904. Fairgoers took their taste home with them and began experimenting with the Hamburg Steak tucked between two slices of bread. No one knows who thought up the hamburger bun, but by the time the White Castle people opened their doors in 1921 most of the country knew about hamburgers. In 1929 Elzie Crisler Segar was further popularizing hamburgers by giving his cartoon creation, Popeye, a sidekick called J. Wellington Wimpy who was rarely pictured without a burger in his hand.
@HelpAPal (65)
• United States
17 Dec 06
food
• Romania
17 Dec 06
A hamburger is a sandwich (in the United States, United Kingdom, South Africa and Saudi Arabia, the patty alone is known as a beefburger or burger) that consists of a patty of ground meat that is usually beef. The meat can be grilled, fried, steamed, or broiled, and is generally served with various condiments and toppings inside a bun baked specially for this purpose. Burgers are often served with french fries, potato chips, or onion rings. Hamburger can also refer to the meat itself. This type of meat can be used in boxed dinners such as "Hamburger Helper". Hamburger is actually a distinct product from ground round and other types of ground meat. However, ground beef of any form is often commonly referred to as "hamburger." A recipe calling for 'hamburger' (the non-countable noun) would require ground beef or beef substitute- not a whole sandwich.