Local Honey is Better for you!

@rainbow (6762)
March 10, 2007 12:22pm CST
Did you know that although honey is reported to be good for us (unless we are pregnant, under a year old or have allergies to it) that local honey is far better for you than honey from the supermarket. If you have asthma, hayfever or associated allergies local honey made by local bees helps you far more because the bees use the things that cause your problems to make their lovely honey. I hadn't realised this until a few weeks ago when discussing my asthma with my friend who had noticed that I hadn't bought my usual honey for a couple of weeks, I had bought cheap honey from the supermarket for cooking and hadn't replaced our normal spreading honey. I usually but "Uncle Buds" honey from her shop. The next week we were back on our usual treat and yes it does make a difference. If you regularly have honey why not sw?tch to a local supplier and see if you notice any difference.
8 people like this
23 responses
@cybergwen (158)
• United States
10 Mar 07
I had read this before and I remember at the time, that it was so obvious, I wondered why I hadn't thought of it before. Now, if I could just get my wallet to go along with the idea. Local honey is so expenxive compared to the regular brands. I always struggle with the justification of the price difference!
@rainbow (6762)
10 Mar 07
I know 89p at tesco or £2.85 at my local shop, but if it helps and you get to support local produce maybe it is worth it. I still use supermarket honey for cooking but like to use real honey for on icecream or bread and treats.
1 person likes this
@lecanis (16661)
• Murfreesboro, Tennessee
10 Mar 07
Thanks for posting such useful information! I knew this, somewhere in the back of my mind I remember hearing it before, but I haven't really been acting on it lately. I usually just buy my honey at the store with everything else, becuase it's so much easier than finding a local supplier. Now I feel inspired, and I'm gonna go out and find a local supplier. With all my allergies and asthma problems, I need all the help I can get.
2 people like this
@rainbow (6762)
10 Mar 07
I think I knew it when I was a kid but I forgot until recently too, I hope you find somewhere local, I get mine from the village butchers, maybe your local vegetable shop or somewhere close sells it. Even if it doesn't make a big difference you will be supporting local prduce which is still worthwhile, let me know how you get on!
3 people like this
• Philippines
11 Mar 07
wow, that's interesting. i thought the kind that we buy from the groceries is made from real honey. i don't know if we have a local supplier here, though, but i'd definitely try to look for one.
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
hiya toonatoons, it is real honey from the greengrocer , although sometimes it is processed and can come from far away. Local honey contains pollens and nectar etc that are the same ones that aggravate our allergies
@gabs8513 (48708)
• United Kingdom
10 Mar 07
Well I don't eat a lot of Honey but I have to admit that I did not know that either, The only time I like Honey is on toast and I do not have toast very often either lol.
2 people like this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
Maybe you should treat yourself to some Gabs, you never know it might help your chest problems a little, I have honey and lemonjuice in hot water most mornings as my first drink, the sweetness really bucks you up to face the day too, and the lemon is meant to help clear bad things too, lol.
• Philippines
10 Mar 07
Honey is really good for the body. I use it in place of sugar..and yes, "local" honey is better than those found in the supermarket as those are already processed. Though I haven't tried switching suppliers yet, maybe I'll do that and see if there's any difference! Thanks for the tip!
2 people like this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
Well, it's certainly worth a try, even if you don't feel a difference you will be supporting local business. I never thought of replacing sugar with it, I suppose I would have to use less ,might try it.
@Willowlady (10665)
• United States
10 Mar 07
We should support out local growers and producers. Also the bees are wonderful for us to utilize for all the products that can be gleaned from them. Sometimes to pay a bit more is totally worth it overall. Fresher, native, loyal etc. Am glad that you have discovered this and are embracing the goodness it offers.
@rainbow (6762)
10 Mar 07
I think I knew why a long time ago but had forgotten, I agree with you completely. I am still suplementing with the supermarket stuff for in cooking but it's nice to remember why I buy it locally too! I have to say the supermarket cheap honey is nowhere near as effective and I definately feel better when I have local honey regularly.
1 person likes this
@Galena (9120)
11 Mar 07
we get ours from a driveway honesty box about 5 minutes walk from our cottage.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
How wonderful, my honey is about a mile away, yours must be really good for you being so close!
@Galena (9120)
11 Mar 07
yup. it's perfectly feasable that those bees might fly to our orchard and sting my dog, who has a potentially fatal bee sting allergy. (ever tried carrying a scottish deerhound in anaphylactic shock?) which is the only problem.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
ouch poor doggy! Dearhound are way to big to carry easily, can he not have the doggy equivalent of an epi-pen? That must be really scary for you both, I hope he's ok!
• United States
14 Apr 07
Local honey helps with alergies because it works like a natural alergy shot. It causes your body to build natural immunity to pollens and other allergens that you are regularly exposed to.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
14 Apr 07
Thanks for the brilliant explanation, it's nice to know that it's good for us as well as yummy for Pooh Bear!
1 person likes this
• United States
17 Apr 07
It is esentially a perfect food. Royal jelly is even better for you. If you take away royal jelly from a queen bee she goes back to being a regular bee and loses her longevity!
1 person likes this
@luzamper (1358)
• Philippines
20 Apr 07
"Unless we are pregnant, under a year old" - these strike my attention. Why is honey not good for them? I remember my friend taking in honey - local and imported when she was pregnant and the baby came out weighing 7.10 and she also fed the baby with honey continuously until grown up. Well, yes, local honey is better because it is not processed. In the processing, of course, there are some ingredients already added and that makes it not better than the local honey especially fresh from the farm.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
7 May 07
There can be something in honey that can make us poorly whilst tiny or pregnant, at other times our bodies can cope with it, I think it can give ou a poorly tummy. I was born on peanutbutter sandwiches and I'm ok, I think it's something beginning with L but it probably depends on the person.
@priya123s (320)
• India
2 Apr 07
yes local honey is bettr for health and some honey toay getting in market is adultrated also and that is bad for health.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
2 Apr 07
Thanks priya!
• United States
1 Apr 07
I try to buy local honey whenever possible. It is said that you can build an immunity to allergies by eating honey that is made locally.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
1 Apr 07
Thank-you for your support with this, I hope we do!
@indigo (5)
• Canada
30 Mar 07
Thank you for that information. I will do that. There is a man down the road from us who does make his own honey from the hives he keeps. My son is the one with asthma, and of the course the one who loves honey! I never gave the connection any thought before.
@rainbow (6762)
30 Mar 07
I truly hope it helps him! Let me know how you get on please!
• United States
24 Mar 07
I switched to local honey a couple of years ago and I won't go back. Not only does it taste better, but my allergies have not been nearly as bad the last two years even though most people around me say their allergies have been worse (they don't eat local honey!). I feel fortunate to live in a place where local honey is easy to find. It's a little more expensive but 100% worth it.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
24 Mar 07
It feels so good to know that someone else has definately had a positive experience from local honey! Prooves the point for posting it really, thank-you!
@mimpi1911 (25473)
• India
13 Mar 07
my mom keeps saying the same. she says that raw, unrefined, country honey is much better than smooth, golden and well packaged ones. according to her, we kinda destroy the nutrients by refining and adding external agents for color and flavor. this is is true for rice aswell. the more crude it is, the more good its for our health. refining shreds off the essential nutrients and we are left with the less nutritious ones. honey is an amazing creation of God with varied and unsurpassable utility. check this out: 1. As it contains sugars which are quickly absorbed by our digestive system and converted into energy, this can be used as instant energizer. 2. As it is hygroscopic it speeds up healing, growth of healing tissue and dries it up. 3. Honey acts as a sedative and is very useful in bed wetting disorders. 4. Honey is very good antioxident which restores the damaged skin and gives soft, young looks. 5. Honey has antibacterial properties due to its acidic nature and enzymically produced hydrogen peroxide. 6. Constant use of honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles to fight bacteria and viral diseases
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
13 Mar 07
I had no idea about the bed wetting - I may have to look into that more deeply, it may help my son. I did know we could put it on cuts etc, and use it in face maskes regularly. Thank-you so much for that lovely list of useful ways to use honey!
@shalwani (760)
• Pakistan
11 Mar 07
Honey For asthma - Honey HOney
Honey contains bits and pieces of pollen and honey, and as an immune system booster, it is quite powerful. I have often in talks and articles, and in my books, advocated using local honey. Frequently I'll get emails from readers who want to know exactly what I mean by local honey, and how "local" should it be. This is what I usually advise:Allergies arise from continuous over-exposure to the same allergens. If, for example, you live in an area where there is a great deal of red clover growing, and if in addition you often feed red clover hay to your own horses or cattle, then it likely you are exposed over and over to pollen from this same red clover. Now, red clover pollen is not especially allergenic but still, with time, a serious allergy to it can easily arise. Another example: if you lived in a southern area where bottlebrush trees were frequently used in the landscapes or perhaps you had a bottlebrush tree growing in your own yard, your odds of over-exposure to this tree's tiny, triangular, and potently very allergenic pollen is greatly enhanced. In the two examples used above, both species of plants are what we call amphipilous, meaning they are pollinated by both insects and by the wind. Honeybees will collect pollen from each of these species and it will be present in small amounts in honey that was gathered by bees that were working areas where these species are growing. When people living in these same areas eat honey that was produced in that environment, the honey will often act as an immune booster. The good effects of this local honey are best when the honey is taken a little bit (a couple of teaspoons-full) a day for several months prior to the pollen season. get honey that was raised closest to where you live, the closer the better since it will have more of exactly what you'll need. It may seem odd that straight exposure to pollen often triggers allergies but that exposure to pollen in the honey usually has the opposite effect. But this is typically what we see. In honey the allergens are delivered in small, manageable doses and the effect over time is very much like that from undergoing a whole series of allergy immunology injections. The major difference though is that the honey is a lot easier to take and it is certainly a lot less expensive. I am always surprised that this powerful health benefit of local honey is not more widely understood, as it is simple, easy, and often surprisingly effective.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
13 Mar 07
Thank-you so much for that lovely clear explanation, we are often surrounded by rape seed grown for its oil and although the yellow fields look beautiful they can be very overpowering especially during harvesting.
@kathy77 (7487)
• Australia
11 Mar 07
Yss honey is very good for us and is healthy, when I was growing up I used to always go to a neighbours house that had their own bee hive and used to sell honey it was very different to the one that you buy in the local supermarkets, so I think that you may have a point here.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
Thanks Kathy, theres something special about going to buy the honey where you can see the hives when you are a kid, we get ours from the butcher now but I have taken my boys to see where the bees live before and they were amazed too, lol.
@villageanne (8553)
• United States
11 Mar 07
Yes local honey is better because the bees eat the same things that you are allergic too. Thus helping your immunine system deal with the very things that you are allergic too. My brother has bees and a neighbor has bees so we always have local honey. I even use pure honey in my bath water so my skin can soak up the local honey there too. However something is killing all the bees so I am really getting concerned.
1 person likes this
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
Hi anne, you are so lucky to always have fresh honey! I get the honey from the butchers but it is harvested by my primary school teachers honey, his was the first honey I remember having when I was about 2, Uncle Buds local honey. Do wasps kill bees or is someone using some nasty chemicals where they fly, I hope they are ok. Can you remember people talking to the bees if there was a problem? As kids we were told "go tell it to the bees as the bees will know what to do"?
@cjsmom (1423)
• United States
11 Mar 07
I just love honey and haven't had it in so long. I remember when mom used to get us the 'bear' container filled with it; I thought it was so neat. CJ saw it in the store some time ago and just had to have it because he thought it was, 'Winnie the Pooh'...the only thing was, he wouldn't let us open it! I'm sure we have a local supplier; I'm going to do some research and find some, soon. Thank you for posting this for us.
@rainbow (6762)
11 Mar 07
I started my boys with Pooh bear honey as soon as they weere old enought to have it as they thought the hive shaped squeezy jars were brilliant and moved them onto local honey when I could, just lately I economised and got supermarket honey and noticed a difference I didn't realise was connected until my friend reminded me I hadn't had any local honey for a few weeks, strangly now Ive got some again I feel better and it tastes far nicer too. I hope you can find some, without a pretty shaped jar for CJ, bless him.
13 Mar 07
I heared it was god for u, as well/.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
11 Mar 07
There is no other place for me to buy honey but the supermarket. I live in the city and I guess the local honey suppliers must be somewhere in the outskirts which would be quite incovenient for me. But I had a bad experience once when I bought a local honey. It wasn't pure honey because after a couple of weeks I noticed clumps of sugar at the bottom of the bottle. Now I am thinking twice about buying that expensive Sue Bee honey and the ones with a bottle shaped like a bear? I have no allergies for honey so maybe it doesn't make any difference if I continue patronizing those available in the supermarket.
1 person likes this
@Aeval39 (774)
• United States
11 Mar 07
That's really interesting! When you explain it that way it makes a lot of sense. I don't have asthma problems but I know a few people who might benefit from this knowledge. Thanks for sharing it!
1 person likes this