Last King of Scotland - Why is most of Africa like that?

Forest Whitaker - As Idi Amin, in Last King of Scotland
April 1, 2007 8:50am CST
Has anyone seen this? It's an awsome awsome movie. Great acting and very enjoyable to the last minute! Brilliant Legendary performance by Forest Whitaker! The character of Idi Amin is tottaly funny and light weight. Yet barbaric nasty and cruel. The scotsman ain't no angel either! The most common question that arises, why are most African nations are considered barbaric and so littered with political instabilities? This film's plot took place over 30 years ago and dare I say, NOTHING has changed much since then. Can someone foucs some light on this subject please? And I had no idea that "Idi Amin-Forest Whitaker's Character" died in my home country!!
1 person likes this
2 responses
@academic2 (7009)
• Uganda
9 Apr 07
I wonder where you come from Silver, but am African myself and I have had first hand experience with these kind of leaders. You see, in the pre-colonial times, Africans were led by chiefs and autocratic kings. They would rule with iron hand, their words were final, and they would rule until they die before handing power to their children. With the coming of democracy, things have been very hard for African leaders-they want to rule until they die yet democratic values are saying this is wrong, so when opposition points this out, they are are beaten up and tear gassed!Have you followed what is happening Zimbabwe? Can you imagine that an 83 year old Mugabe still wants to run for President and is beating up every body and ruining the economy? Have you heard that another dictator, Museveni of Uganda has changed the constitution to rule for more than two terms? Have you seen Menes Zinawe of Ethiopia shooting and killing hundreds of opposition in Adis? These African leaders just cant manage Democracy, and yet they want to masquerade as democratic leaders-when infact, they are primitive African tyrants dressed in western coats! The amazing thing though, are the double standards of the western powers, Brittain and America-they are blamng Mugabe, but are quiet about the damage being caused by Museveni and Menez Zinawe to ther respective countrymen! What a shame!
9 Apr 07
Thank you for your comment. I really never had an insider's point of view of this issue before. Most in lightning.
• United States
8 May 07
This is, indeed, an excellent comment. I was going to comment, but you have definitely given a better one that I ever would have. I do agree that the United States seems to only pay attention to African issues when it is convenient to do so. I wish they would pay more attention to the continent.
@urbandekay (18308)
8 May 07
I like to add that Europe wasn't that different for hundreds of years we lived under tyrants and fought bloody wars but these wars forged in people a strong sense of identity and or nationhood. One thing I observed in Africa is that a lot of people identify with their tribe before their country, so that a leader of a particular tribe is elected he works for the benefit of his tribe rather than the good of the country as a whole. And without a tradition of a strong press it is easy for corruption to take hold. A strong free press is a bulwark against such injustice. all the best urban
1 person likes this
9 May 07
Deffinietly a positve rate here! + + That's so unfortunate, what you said and tottally over looked. Thanks for bringing that to mind. Being part of a tirbal system is not a good thing after all. To really divorce yourself from the tribe takes a lot of courage and educational "wisdom". Africa still has a long, long way to go and sorry to say, it's not going to see the light anytime soon.
@urbandekay (18308)
9 May 07
But there is hope and the hope for Africa lies with the woman there. The men have reasons to support the status quo, but some women are working hard to drag themselves up and educate themselves, often rejected by their tribes and sometimes by their communities, their the real hope, at least as I see it. all the best urban