Santa Claus and lies

@miamilady (4924)
United States
April 17, 2007 10:45am CST
If you allow your children to believe in Santa Clause, aren't you lying to them? So many of us try to teach our children to be honest. When you let them believe year after year that Santa is real, and then one day you have to admit that you were the one putting the gifts under the tree, aren't you teaching them that it is okay to lie?
5 people like this
15 responses
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
17 Apr 07
Hello Miamilady, I believe that the two can be reconciled. For example: It's entirely feasible to explain Jesus's birth, and St. Nick to the kids, then expound on the story to include how magic fills the hearts of all those who celebrate Christmas. And that miracles have been known to happen at that special time of the year. They'll get most of the Santa stuff from the commercialization of the holiday. Then as the kids grow older, you explain a little more about the meaning of Christmas, adding on year to year. You will not be lying, rather extending the amount of time it takes to tell the whole story. What I used to tell my nieces when they were little is that St. Nick IS the Christmas spirit. And that God allows St. Nick's spirit to touch everyone during the season. Which is why some people dress up like Santa. And why other people mimick St. Nick's gift-giving tradition.
• Australia
18 Apr 07
Not everyone is religious so there's no point in telling a child about Jesus if no-one else in the family believes it's true. To a non-religious family telling a child about Jesus could also be classed as lying coz they they cant prove his existance either. I don't mean to sound rude or harsh but if you weren't religious, why would you tell a child a story that you yourself don't believe?
@stephcjh (32328)
• United States
17 Apr 07
I don't think we are lying to them about Santa Claus. We are simply showing them the true meaning of Crhistmas and the way Christmas came about and has been enjoyed for a very long time. I try to teach my daughter to be honest but I loved seeing the gleem in her eyes when she thought she had been a good girl and Santa brought her some gifts for it. I don;t think we are teaching them it is okay to lie but I think we are teaching them good ways to show their children to be good little boys and girls so Santa as in mommy and daddy, will provide good things for them.
@34momma (13896)
• United States
24 May 07
i totally agree with you. i have never taught my children the lie that some fat white guy is going to bring them toys in the middle of the nite. i think it is silly to allow your children believe in things that are not true. fantasy is play batman and robin, santa is just a out and out lie
@miamilady (4924)
• United States
24 May 07
A few people interpreted my original discussion to mean that I did not or would not have my children believe in Santa. That is not the case. I did let my children believe in Santa. But I was always somewhat conflicted about it. I used to have very strict standards about what constitues a lie. I have since, relaxed my standards. I do think technically it is a lie but I do like the argument that it is a "story". I think lying is not something that is necessarily always wrong. I might have to start another discussin. lol Thanks for your response. I just want to add, that although I did let my kids believe in Santa and it was a fun thing to do. I respect those who are not comfortable with going that route. I just hope that they would respect the choice of others who want their children to believe in Santa and teach their children to respect others who choose to believe.
• Canada
19 Sep 07
When our kids were very young we didn't mention anything about Santa only as a story about a jolly guy a long time ago, who gave presents to children in his village. When we would leave to buy presents for them we'd say something along the lines of should we give Santa some money to help him pay for the presents? The kids always took that as a joke. They never thought there was a Santa or the Easter bunny or tooth fairy (or any other myth) so we never had to undo the lie at any point.
• United States
19 Sep 07
Hey Miami, Is it really a lie or is it just supporting a fantasy? I knew all along that my parents were putting the presents under the tree. I dont recall being upset that they led me to believe this or felt that they lied to me. If I felt they lied to me it certainly didnt affect me as an adult! The whole story behind Santa and Christmas is just fantasy. It makes kids excited and who doenst like to see an excited child with a gleam in their eye wondering what Santa brought them this year? The idea of Santa Clause just sets the mood for the Holidays. Its harmless to let kids think their is a Santa Claus that flies through the night and slides down chimneys to drop off presents for good little boys and girls. I dont think its any different than reading them a fictional book. Are you going to ruin it after its read by saying, "now this is not real, its made up". And then your definately not going to label the book as a lie. Santa Claus is no more than a fictional character that most of us grew up on. Did we feel lied too? I surely didnt. Bay xx
@agnescav (566)
• United States
19 Sep 07
I do think that allowing children to believe in Santa Claus is wrong. It is lying. I taught my children that Santa is a good story but the real Santa is all the people who love them and want them to be happy and well wrapped up into one. And that they are a part of other people's Santas. I also told them to keep this a secret since some adults like their children to believe in the bearded man. My youngest two did not believe me. After opening their big mouths, some of their friends' parents were upset that someone at school was telling people there was no Santa and my children were absolutely convinced there was a Santa. As far as keeping the innocence of children alive, if we need to lie to them how innocent is childhood?
@carolscash (9501)
• United States
19 Sep 07
No, as Santa was a real person and I think that we are only going on with traditions. I don't feel that it is lying. It is just like telling them about God- someone we can't see or prove but we know that he is real! santa was real and that meaning of Christmas is still real.
@bonbon664 (3470)
• Canada
18 Sep 07
I think it's ok to let kids think there is a Santa. Kids lose their innocence so early these days, I think it's great if they have something fanciful for them to believe in. It's not exactly a lie, to me, it's like telling them a fantasy story.
@bonbon664 (3470)
• Canada
18 Sep 07
I think it's ok to let kids think there is a Santa. Kids lose their innocence so early these days, I think it's great if they have something fanciful for them to believe in. It's not exactly a lie, to me, it's like telling them a fantasy story.
@gradyslady (4055)
• United States
18 Sep 07
I found out from school that Santa wasn't real and it made me really sad. I want to be honest with my kids, but then it takes the fun out of it when they're young, they get so excited knowing Santa is bringing them gifts. It's a really hard one.
@wiccania (3360)
• United States
19 Jul 07
I think that the Santa Claus story isn't so much lying as it is inspiring their imagination as well as their spirit of generosity. There was, I believe, a true Santa Claus, minus the flying reindeer and elves, we're simply perpetuating the spirit of giving that he embodied. When I found out that the Santa Claus from the Night Before Christmas and similar stories wasn't real, I wasn't disappointed.
@twoey68 (13651)
• United States
24 May 07
I think when they are little...2,3 or 4 its allright to let them believe in these types of things...santa, the easter bunny, the tooth fairy...but when they get school age I think they should really be told the truth. LIVE IN PEACE
@Nebuloso (179)
• United States
18 Apr 07
I think I'd have to go with Gemmygirl1 on this one. I grew up believing in Santa Claus. After I found out the truth, I don't remember thinking, "Oh well, so it must be okay to lie after all." If by some strange chance I did think that, I certainly don't view my parents as liars today because of it.
@Gemmygirl1 (2870)
• Australia
18 Apr 07
Well, i don't even remember being told Santa wasn't real - so obviously it doesn't make that much of an impact in your life! If you were taught about Santa when you were young, do you remember how excited you were on Xmas Eve when you knew he was going to leave you gifts but you couldn't get to sleep! Do you remember how much fun it was waking up on Xmas morning & seeing all the things he'd left for you & how much fun you had opening everything? It's just like a child having an imaginary friend, it's made up but to them it's real - you don't think of that as a lie, so Santa really isn't a lie either, he's just a make believe character that keeps kids excited!
• United States
17 Apr 07
I think children need some fantasy in their lives as it stimulates their imagination. However I think when they get older you sould tell them the truth before they hear it (and they will) from someone else.