Pregnancy Taboos

@birthlady (5613)
United States
October 25, 2006 2:47pm CST
Different cultures have different things that a pregnanct woman must not do, this things are "taboo". From eating certain foods to looking at certain animals, pregnancy taboos vary around the world. Do you know of any? What were you supposed to avoid during pregnancy? Why?
1 person likes this
7 responses
• United States
26 Oct 06
Smoking.... it can do many horrible things to you unborn child.
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@birthlady (5613)
• United States
26 Oct 06
Thank you!
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@birthlady (5613)
• United States
4 Nov 06
Yes, of course, smoking harms baby and mom. In some cultures, for example, a pregnancy taboo is "don't get scared or an emotional shock" because the baby might be born with a birth defect.
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@birthlady (5613)
• United States
20 Nov 06
I was told, with my first pregnancy, that my baby was going to be "soulful". I asked why, and I was told, "Because of the way you are".
• United States
26 Oct 06
My mom told me not to drive at all.
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@birthlady (5613)
• United States
26 Oct 06
Thank you!
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@SViswan (12071)
• India
21 Nov 06
Well...in India..most of us are advised against pineapple and papaya. I read somewhere that there are some enzymes in pineapple that MIGHT harm the baby especially during the first two trimesters and if it is eaten raw. But the women of older generations believe that papaya increases the heat of the body and may cause harm. Nowadays, most pregnant women are not allowed to move about and asked not to do even their daily chores. But earlier (during my grannie's time), everyone was active right until the time of delivery. My grannie advised the same thing and first time round, I just went ahead and did everything I had to do...and luckily I had an easy delivery. I was careful though about not slipping and falling and stuff like that. I have been advised to be very careful for my second one now because the umblical cord was sighted NEAR the neck and the doctor didn't want me doing any heavy work in case the cord wound around the baby's neck. Another 'taboo' I heard last week...'a pregnant woman isn't allowed to thread a needle for someone else'..I don't believe in such taboos.
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
21 Nov 06
Thank you very much! I am interested in the taboo "a pregnant woman isn't allowed tothread a needle for someone else..." I wonder why. There are always reasons behind taboos...
@SViswan (12071)
• India
22 Nov 06
I know...but this person who told me that didn't know herself. Like most of these kind of things..it's passed on word of mouth with no explanations. There are so many things I've asked my mom and she doesn't know herself...her viewpoint is 'we listened to our moms blindly..now you do it'. Another one is pregnant women should sleep on their left side. It's okay to turn to the other side once in a while but sleep on your left most of the time..never on your back. And when you need to turn over to the other side, you always have to sit up and then lie down on the other side. The reason for that being (so I've heard) that the blood circulation to the baby is done better if you sleep on your left. And the reason for sitting up before turning over is to avoid the chance of the umblical cord twisting around the baby's neck.
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
22 Nov 06
Sleeping on the left side has physiologic reasons because it allows blood flow to the uterus through the vena cava without pressure from weight of the uterus.
@toonatoons (3739)
• Philippines
24 Dec 06
well, i've often heard the old people tell pregnant women not to wear a necklace because so the umbilical cord will not coil around the baby's neck and kill him/her.
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
24 Dec 06
Thank you!
• United States
22 Nov 06
Im wondering if you question of taboo was understood? I am a mexican woman who has a filipino fiance and when I was pregnat I was always told not to let myself go without something I was craving. my mother & grandmother always said if I was craving something then I should eat it or my child would be born with it's mouth open. My niece was born with her mouth open & she swallowed her own poopoo. :( she was sick for a while too. My fiances grandmother, is filipino. she used to tell me NOT to walk outside barefoot. she said there were lil fairys outside that would try to harm me or my child. When I asked my fiances mother about this she said it was an old wives tale they told back in her country. :]
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
24 Dec 06
This is exactly what I'm refering to as taboo! Thank you so much! Every culture has things pregnant women should avoid, such as not allowing yourself to go without eating something you crave! Thank you again!
• United States
22 Nov 06
When I was pregnant I was giving a paper by my doctor telling me not consume any raw foods, shellfish, sushi, etc. Also he said that if I eat tuna or anything else high in mercury to keep it to once a week or less. My mother told me to avoid putting my arms over my head or the umbilical cord could strangle the baby, but I realized quickly that it is almost impossible to not put your hands up over you head for 40 weeks. With my first pregnancy I was told not to take baths, but for my second and third I was told baths are fine, but not too hot, too long, and to use caution getting in and out of the tub. I have also read that you shouldn't get your hair dyed while pregnant, but I don't anyway so it wasn't a problem for me.
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
22 Nov 06
Hot tubs aren't recommended during pregnancy...
• United States
21 Nov 06
I live in the United States I was always told not to eat Orsters or certain types of sea food. And also not to hold your arms above your head while your pregnant. That suppose to have something to do with causing the cord to wrap around that babies neck.
@birthlady (5613)
• United States
22 Nov 06
Hi, its good advise to stay away from certain seafoods and fish during pregnancy because of high mercury levels in some fish. I've heard it's bad to do head-stands during pregnancy because of the risk of the baby changing positions causing a true knot in the umbilical cord.