writers block

United States
September 20, 2007 5:25pm CST
I write alot of spoken word but sometimes it seems like im writing the same thing... or not i get so froozen my head starts hurting lol Anyways wondering to all writers how do u get a fresh start?
2 people like this
4 responses
@Seaclans (215)
• United States
21 Sep 07
I like a technique from a book I read called Artist's Way (I think that was the title). They called it Morning Pages, when you first get up, you fill two pieces of paper with whatever come into your head, without stopping. Grammar, spelling, and punctuation don't matter. I did this for a long time and found that it cleared my head of clutter and worries. And occasionally a good, creative idea would pop up in the pages as well. They also had an idea called, Artist Dates. Basically, you treat yourself to new sights, sounds, and sensations and do things you always wanted to do. You are supposed to do them alone for the most part. The idea is to fill the well of your creativity with new, good stuff. Hope these ideas help. I recommend the book to anyone who is looking to increase their creativity.
• Canada
21 Sep 07
As a fellow writer, I knwo what you mean about writers block, LOL. Tends to happen t me alot, but I do the same tticks eveyr time and they never fail, atleast for me: 1. Watch a movie that forces you to think about stuff you may have never thought about before, such as Snow Cake or Running With Scissors. Sometimes, you'll find a new thought floating around in your head that will work within your story :) 2. Go for a walk out in nature. If you live in the city, walk in the park :) I find even just sitting on a bench and watching people go about their day brings plenty of new thoughts to the surface 3. Spend time with a pet. When I'm stumped, I sit down wihth my dog, Chelsea or one of my two cats and I try to imagine what they're thinking about. Corny as it sounds, it tends to sprout more ideas than one would think, if you dig deep enough. 4. Dig deep within yourself. Sit somewhere calm and quiet, put on some Namaste (Returning to now = beautiful song) or other meditation music, and just...relax. Feel yourself float away, but don't try to block all thought from your brain like you would with meditation: try to bring up thoughts to the surface, old thoughts you wanted to forget, any feelings, etc. The time is now to reflect on them. 5. Walk around your house and pick five random objects (or, better yet, get someone else to!). There are two things you can do: - Set them all out on the table and look at them CLOSELY. See the way they're put together, wonder what lies in their core. Sure, you probably won't get any brilliant ideas out of it, but atleast you'll be constructively thinking about something :) or - Take those fives things somehow incorporate them into a story. It doesn't matter if it's silly, just force yourself to write! The ideas will come before you knwo it :) Best of luck! Hope my ti[ps were somewhat helpful!!
@dani27 (545)
• United States
23 Oct 07
Those are great ideas, some of them I have never thought of. I am going to use some of your ideas. Thanks so much.
@gwendovere (1283)
• United States
22 Sep 07
I write about my experiences & fantasies, mostly. But I think the biggest key to getting a fresh start is to read the works of others who have been published.
@jmbauer (43)
• United States
22 Sep 07
In my experience, boredom fosters creativity. Get into some sort of daily routine (a walk along the same rout, a lengthy seat in the same place at roughly the same time, etc). No matter the temptation, don't incorporate new things. Let the bordum overtake you. With any luck, you'll be thinking all sorts of crazy things--some may spawn your next story idea. I also like the suggestion of reading daily. I find it's a good imagination loosener, especially if you're amerced in the material. Another favorite of mine: relax. Don't sit and ruminate over your inability to produce "worthy" prose. Most of my ideas are born when I least expect them; thoughts rarely come when I think they should. Lastly, there's always simply taking a break. This is effective if you can successfully skirt the line between a break and a hiatus. I think the length of downtime--and the method for that matter--are specific to the individual. Trust me, I've gone too long before, and it's quite rough returning to the writing groove.