McCain STILL Confused Over Iraq al Qaeda!

@anniepa (27238)
United States
April 8, 2008 10:31pm CST
Here's part of the exchange between John McCain and General Petraeus today: During today’s hearing with Gen. David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) questioned Petraeus on what he called “the major threat” of al Qaeda in Iraq. Coming on the heels of his recent confusion over the nature of al Qaeda, McCain today seemed to refer to al Qaeda as a “sect of Shi’ites”: MCCAIN: Do you still view al Qaeda in Iraq as a major threat? PETRAEUS: It is still a major threat, though it is certainly not as major a threat as it was say 15 months ago. MCCAIN: Certainly not an obscure sect of the Shi’ites overall? PETREAUS: No. MCCAIN: Or Sunnis or anybody else. Read more here or see the video: http://thinkprogress.org/2008/04/08/mccain-confused-about-al-qaeda-again-suggests-its-a-sect-of-shiites/ Is anyone else here a bit concerned about McCain's obvious confusion between Sunnis and Shi'ites? Are you sure you want him to be the one answering the phone at 3 AM - or any other time? Annie
4 responses
@jormins (1224)
• United States
10 Apr 08
I was very surprised to see that (although it was a very nice welcome after not seeing/doing anything political for almost a week vacation). I would think McCain would be counting Sunni & Shiia in his sleep after the embarrassing Leiberman incident in the Middle-East. Considering this is supposed to be McCain's strongest qualities I fear he may be doing this on purpose. If they keep saying Al Qaeda and Iran enough times will the general public just assume that they are somehow related? I think a possible priming for some later hard core policy from McCain on Iran. Perhaps McCain is intending to include Iran in his 100 year plan? If he is not trying to prepare us for some action in Iran, then I do fear he is losing it. It would explain much of his recent policy shifts to the right and him hugging up on W at the White House.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
10 Apr 08
I hope you had a great vacation! You make some good points here and I couldn't agree more. It seems to me, either of the two options are quite scary, indeed. If McCain wins we either get a President who's losing it or another war which will surely be even much worse than this one. Annie
@calcynic (433)
• United States
9 Apr 08
Either McCain is consciously, for political reasons, keeping the words AlQaeda and Iraq linked to subliminally brainwash the voters, or he's joined his late buddies, Reagan and Charlton Heston on the Alzheimer's Express. AlQaeda in Iraq is a bunch of militants that have NO affiliation with BinLaden's mob. They comprise a tiny percentage of the warriors that want us out of there. They are also absent the funding that BinLaden's mob enjoys. They are like a burr in a shoe, a pain in the butt, but not lethal. McCain is simply an old man, way past his prime, who has NO grasp on any of the important issues affecting this country. His life experience is encapsulated as a former POW, career Navy man, and a member of the Armed Services committee. You would think he would be an expert on the ups and downs of using war as an instrument of foreign policy. He, however, only sees the tactical side of the war...he is too dense to see the idiocy behind us going to war in the first place. He still defends our involvement in VietNam. If there is any such thing as a "warmonger gene", a test on McCain's DNA would isolate it. If this guy gets elected President, be afraid....be VERY afraid.
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
10 Apr 08
AMEN! It's unfortunate, but if someone states the obvious - that just because someone was a war hero and a POW does NOT qualify him to be Commander-In-Chief - they're accused of being disrespectful. I'm sorry, but this is definitely the case with McCain and thousands of other veterans; we owe them a debt of gratitude for their service to our country, whether we agreed with the war they fought in or not, but that alone does not make them qualified to be the President. Annie
@skinnychick (6907)
• United States
9 Apr 08
LOL...All I can say is this is an example of that Alzheimer's setting in we talked about in another discussion. Yep! He'd sure make a good Vice President or is that President?
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27238)
• United States
9 Apr 08
I'm afraid you may be right. They're actually paying attention on TV this time, talking about the difference in him between his 2000 campaign and now. Annie
@clrumfelt (5424)
• United States
10 Apr 08
The danger here is that someone by nitpicking the words of these hearings apart will proverbially "throw out the baby with the bathwater." That is, instead of getting the message that things really are getting better over there, people won't know. The fact is that Al Qaeda are Sunni Muslims,and Shiite Muslims are a big part of Iraq's population. Probably a lot of the Sunni Muslims that are in Iraq are Al Quaeda. If not,they are still a politically aligned group. Both parties, Sunni and Shiite, want control of Iraq's government. The conflict reached a level in 2006 of almost being a civil war. So, since all Al Quaeda are Sunnis, all Sunnis are Muslims, Al Quaeda are present in Iraq, but the Sunnis present there may be or not be Al Quaeda, where is the confusion in that? Even the best political scientist would need cheat notes on that one.