Veterinary Medicine and rabies vaccination

Guatemala
June 12, 2008 5:01pm CST
I'm a second semester student of Veterinary Medice, and my university put a lot of emphasis in hands on and field work experience. We had the chance to do a rabies vaccination campaign last semester were my group of 5 students vaccinated more than 250 dogs and cats. I was just wondering what is the best way of application of the vaccines? By intramuscular way or subcutanously?? Isn't there a high risk of hitting the ciatic nerve in the hind leg if you apply it by the intramuscular way? What application form is less painful fot the animal?
1 person likes this
2 responses
@mclendon (308)
• United States
12 Jun 08
A bit of tough question for this forum, don't you think? I'm not a veterinarian, but I used to be a vet tech at a busy suburban animal hospital with 4 veterinarians. They all did it subcutaneously in the scruff of the neck area. My understanding is that it is less painful for the animal, less likely to miss if they flinch or jump, and less likely to result in soreness.
• Guatemala
12 Jun 08
Thanks mclendon. I noticed that by vaccinating subcutaneously it was a lot easier to stop accidents when they flinch. My teacher though, always wais that when you really know how to put it intramuscularly it is way safer and quicker. He never mentioned if the animals felt more pain. I think your right though... I'll keep using the subcutanous way.
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
13 Jun 08
We always did the rabies subcutaneously in the right rear section of the animal. I thought there was more of a danger of abscessing in the scruff region?
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
13 Jun 08
SubQ is definitely less painful (think back to injections you've had yourself). IM tends to sting and be sore for much longer. I've always done rabies vaccinations SubQ at the animal hospital I used to work at. But some vaccinations are done IM. When I do IM injections on the cattle at school, I always draw back first to make sure I don't get blood. If not, then I'm safe and go for it. That way, if it's one that is deadly if it gets in a vein, you can be sure. As far as hitting nerves, I guess you just have to learn the correct spots to try. I would know more about that on farm animals than dogs and cats though. I'm hoping to get into a vet school by next year.
• Guatemala
13 Jun 08
I also do vaccinations IM when on cattle. It's so much easier and faster, and drawing back first so see if there's blood is always the correct step to take. Good luck in getting in to vet school, you'll love it!