Where should we look for alternative fuel sources?

@shamsta19 (3225)
United States
July 14, 2008 2:25am CST
With the price of crude oil and gasoline skyrocketing out of control, and the issues of global warming and our ozone, what should our next move be? Where do we began investing our energy and effort? What is the most practical solution for us right now? Solar power? Wind Power? Alternative Gases? Ethanol? I would love to hear some intelligent input on the subject....
4 people like this
7 responses
@urbandekay (18312)
14 Jul 08
Instead of looking to business or governments the answer lies with each of us. We can change things from below. Local cooling is the answer to global warming! I collect used vegetable oil from restaurants and convert this to diesel to run my truck on. I am hoping to be able to use the by product of this process as a heating fuel, though some extra work is needed on that. I drive a Land Rover Defender, this is the most energy efficient vehicle; since vehicle manufacture uses more energy than driving the vehicle and since Land Rovers last so long they are more efficient. Also the energy in their manufacture is derived more from human power and less from automation than most cars. I built my workshop from reclaimed materials, even including the strip lights and fittings, tools, etc. all the best urban
@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
14 Jul 08
Well it sounds like you are definently doing your part. As a whole though we need to make a bigger impact though. I do not believe we have much time left before we began to see major changes in our planets geology due to global warming and pollutants. Not saying I am looking for our government or big corporations to do something but a global impact has to be made and I fear it goes far beyond what a few individuals are doing. I do commend your efforts and hope more follow in your footsteps.
@Wizzywig (7859)
14 Jul 08
I saw something about the vegetable oil thing in a TV programme a couple of months ago... I guess you need to allow a fair bit of time for collection and processing? I'd always assumed that any Land Rover would be heavy on fuel so, thanks for dispelling that assumption. My dad was always one for using reclaimed materials to find solutions so I have inherited his 'hoarding' gene.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18312)
14 Jul 08
Yes, it takes a while and some expense to process but even including your time it works out a lot cheaper than petro-diesel and as a fuel burns a lot cleaner. And is more lubricating so kinder on the pump. The environmental benefits apply only to the classic Landie not the Discovery, Range Rover or Freelander models. By the same reasoning hybrid vehicles are exactly the wrong way to go, since the energy involved in the manufacture far outweighs any gain in running them. all the best urban
1 person likes this
• Singapore
14 Jul 08
Honestly, we have the alternative solutions but the governments do want to change to such solutions becuase of the income. I would invest in solar and biofuel. More reliable than wind and gases. I do not like the idea of using hyrodgen in my car. But even though such things are avilable it will be a long time before the whole start using them. But to me i still feel that the alternative solutions are dependable on the conditions. I mean if lets say if there is too much cloud cover than solar power would be redundant. And with people increasing their electrical usage i guess it is going to be long time for any major change.
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@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
14 Jul 08
As I have already stated, I fear we don't have a lot of time. Solar and biofuel eh?
• Singapore
14 Jul 08
True we do not have that much time. But do government bodies consider it, i do think so. SUch alternatives have been around for many years. But how many are implementing it today. Even in singapore , it is difficult to go green. Hybrid cars are expensive to buy and the taxes that we have to pay is burning in hole the pocket. But when compared to a normal car that runs on petrol or diesel is cheaper.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18312)
14 Jul 08
Yes, solar power is important, but we should not be making solar panels here. Instead we should invest money in a solar power manufacturing plant in Africa, firstly to provide wealth and employment there and secondly because the panels would work better there all the best urban
1 person likes this
@Zmugzy (773)
28 Aug 08
Most people think of solar power as a few panels on a rooftop producing hot water or a bit of electricity. But we should be building vast solar farms in North Africa's deserts. According to German scientists by covering just 0.5% of the world's hot deserts 'concentrated solar power' (CSP) could provide the world's entire electricity need. CSP technology has been around for a while. There is a plant in the Mojave desert in California and others are being constructed in Nevada, Spain and Australia. CSP makes use of mirrors that concentrate the sun's rays on a central column containing some sort of gas or liquid that heats up. The heat is then used to power conventional steam turbines as in a conventional power station. This form of solar power has an advantage because the hot liquid or gas can be stored so that the power station is able to produce energy even when the sun goes down. In Europe we should be developing a new high-voltage direct current electricity grid that would enable the easy, efficient transportation of electricity from a wide range of alternative sources. In the UK we should continue with the development of wind power. In the short term vast improvements in energy efficiency can be made. Other countries could also use this technology along with hydro, biomass and geo-thermal. The whole if Europe and North Africa could provide most of its own electricity in this way by 2050. There would be little need for fossil fuels and no need for highly costly nuclear power. We should not be building new coal power stations nor should we be condemning future generations with huge financial debts and mountains of radioactive waste by building more nuclear power stations. Unfortunately many politicians such as Gordon Brown and George Bush, remain ignorant or unwilling to pursue simple and readily available technologies such as CSP.
@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
29 Aug 08
A fact I too happen to agree with. These technologies are readily available to us and politics always seem to impede the progress. I am in firm belief that we need a change in government so we are no longer led by these money greedy politicians and replace them with persons who actually care about the future of our planet. That's all it really comes down too because I am sure there are people working on these technologies that are held back by these b@#$#@ds bureaucrats in office.
@Zmugzy (773)
29 Aug 08
Unfortunately, at least in the UK, I don't think a change of government will make any difference. The opposition party are full of rhetoric without the policy and will lead us even further away from solving the energy crisis via green technologies. You only have to look at the new Conservative mayor of London cancelling all the progressive policies that were introduced by the previous administration.
@DarkDancer (1012)
• Dayton, Ohio
14 Jul 08
"Let us vow to get off of this sauce" Ani Defranco We need to get away from carbon altogether as a fuel. Wind, water, solar, hydrogen, even biofuels for a temporary stop gap measure. I saw someone on television tonight who said the thing I have been saying for months now. The Oil companies need to stop seeing themselves as oil companies and realize that they are energy providers. (They have the money to create the infrastructure needed and admittedly have a vested interest.)
1 person likes this
@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
15 Jul 08
And they also are the greedy war mongers who got us into this mess in the first place. I do agree with you though, they definently have the resources to provide some help in this crisis. The question is are they willing?
1 person likes this
• Dayton, Ohio
15 Jul 08
Well, if they have a brain they will be, I just hope they don't grow brains too late.
1 person likes this
@cyberfluf (5005)
• Netherlands
29 Aug 08
Global warming, I say solar energy. It's clean and we are said to be getting lots of it. Solar and wind energy are clean forms of energy. We should invent a system to load a battery full of it so we can still drive when there is not much sun or wind.
@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
29 Aug 08
I was just reading something about solar energy and how it can be siphoned from few areas on the planet enough to power everything! I know the sun doesn't ever stop shining so unless there is a supernova we'd have an unlimited energy supply.
14 Jul 08
I would love to see water-powered machines / transport. To me it doesn't seem to outrageous or impossible, I feel that we need the big companies (Ford, Nissan, GMC etc) to forget about profits / business for a short while and get together and try and sort the situation out. After all, the planet is more important than profit margins of already powerful companies! Great topic by the way!
1 person likes this
@shamsta19 (3225)
• United States
17 Jul 08
And there are already cars that run on water now! You can actually convert your car to run on water though it is not an easy process and requires some mechanical work but the thing is it is possible! A couple of MyLotters have posted responses to this topic and check out this one: http://www.mylot.com/w/discussions/1521480.aspx
• United States
17 Jul 08
we should look at vegetable oil
1 person likes this