Just Some Answers Please?!

@ZephyrSun (7385)
United States
July 28, 2008 8:33am CST
The current President Bush has said over and over that he was a "C" student. He has made some comments about people with higher degrees than what he has, I believe if I read correctly he has a Master's degree. Please feel free to respectfully correct me if I am wrong. John McCain said repeated many times that he was "5th from the bottom of his class" at his school. Now, I honestly do not know anything about military school so again, please correct me if I am wrong, but isn't that a bad thing? While I couldn't find Obama stating his GPA in any speeches, I did find several reports that varied from his GPA being anywhere from a 3.4 to a 3.8. Depending on the grading scale used at the college he attended it could be a "B" and possibly an "A". But, let's just say a "B". I think that the president should be educated and not only have a degree but also the knowledge that goes along with that degree. If we hold sport figures as role model and they should not do certain actions because it looks bad for the children that hold them in such hero like status shouldn't we hold our president the same way? What are your thoughts on this? Do you think that the president of the United States doesn't need to be educated? Do you think that since they have advisors that it doesn't matter if they are smart? Let's all be respectful to everyone's thoughts, ideas, and comments.
2 people like this
3 responses
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
28 Jul 08
George W. Bush does have an MBA from Harvard. He did make a speech at Yale where he said something like "And to the C students, you too can become president". I'm quite sure he said that as a joke and people did laugh. This was early in his presidency when he was popular and people liked his speech. In truth while he may have been a C student at Yale, he couldn't have been a C student while earning his MBA at Harvard. Any grades below a B in a Masters program are practically failing grades. Most colleges will allow a maximum of 2 C's, neither of which can be in required courses. I would guess that Harvard may be even more strict. I don't know for sure what McCain's GPA was, but I have heard that he graduated close to the bottom of his class (although not from an authoritative source). That said, he DID graduate. My wife learned very quickly after graduating that your GPA is completely meaningless in the real world. Go ahead and put it on a resume, nobody cares. I was a C student and occasionally a D student while working on my associates and bachelor's degrees. Why? Because I could be. For my Masters I was an A student through most of the program and finished with a 3.7. I've never seen a college grading scale that would list 3.4-3.8 as an A. My college, USF considered a 3.7-3.9 A-, but only a 4.0 is called an A. Since there is no evidence of his GPA it's largely irrelevant. Obviously a president should be educated, but a GPA is hardly indicative of how intelligent or educated a person is. I used selective laziness and my math skills to do the absolute least amount of work possible to finish my classes with the minimum required grade. I learned everything I needed to and counted on my ability to ace tests and exams while ignoring many assignments.
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@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
28 Jul 08
I asked someone about McCain's 5th of the bottom, they put me onto this clip that I will give you the link to I checked it out and it appears to be a speech given by McCain, the same person also said that in his book (I didn't ask which one and I have no idea if he has more than one)that he was in the bottom of his class. So here is link incase you would like to hear the statement for yourself. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vsiADdmoh3E&NR=1
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
28 Jul 08
Hello ZephyrSun, This is a really terrific discussion topic!!! There are many angles from which to tackle your underlying question. I'll tackle just one angle, if it's alright with you. I live not far from Los Alamos, NM and Albuquerque, NM, where the Los Alamos National Laboratories and Sandia National Laboratories can be found. Residents familiar with both frequently comment how the 'coneheads' have no common sense. As with most observations, this is neither fully accurate nor inaccurate. However, there does seem to be an increased likelihood that the people with the highest levels of education and academic achievement may, and often do, lack solid social or 'people' skills. The reality is that we neither want an emotionally underdeveloped or an intellectually underdeveloped President, with access to the 'nuclear football'. So, my take is that as with most things in life, moderation is the key! We want a President to have developed cognitive abilities, and emotional stability if not marked maturity. As such, I would welcome a "C" student, who had significant 'extra-curricular' experience, and ecclectic development where he or she has more wholly developed their 'self' over a President who was an outstanding student, yet lacked core structural emotional development. Specifically, I have considerable concerns about Sen. Obama's repeated references to 'racial identity issues' in his own book and certain interviews that he has given. Identity issues can be, and often are, an indication of an underdeveloped emotional foundation. As such, if the choice was limited to a pure choice, where one candidate is dynamically 'emotionally' developed and the other is dynamically 'intellectually' developed, I would choose the emotional giant over the intellectual giant. The reason is because a President with an average IQ, and excellent judgement can always summon experts in any field to provide the details. That's not the case with a President who may be an intellectual giant, but who is prohibited by public perception from assigning the touch judgement calls and national decisions to a third party.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
28 Jul 08
Oops! The last line of my response should read: ... tough judgement calls and national decisions to a third party.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
28 Jul 08
Excellent post! I'm sure many of us have noticed the social awkwardness of people judged to be geniuses. Specifically I've noticed schizophrenia to be very common amongst such people. A while back they did a study on MENSA members providing a quiz with common sense questions that average people were able to answer easily. The majority of those in MENSA failed the test miserably. Now I'm going to have to hunt that study down so I can post it.
1 person likes this
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
28 Jul 08
Hello Taskr, Thank you for the kind words. Yup, ya' got me! I'd be very interested in reading that mensa data. As an aside, I know several people who have passed on mensa membership in an attempt to avoid such pre-conceived notions about their full range of abilities.
@relundad (2311)
• United States
28 Jul 08
I find this to be an interesting topic of discussion. Mostly becase having lived in the real world for quite sometime after graduating with a 3.83, I know that it doesn't make jack in the real world. Nobody cares but you! I can also tell you that it sure as heck isn't an indicator of your level of intelligence. At least they attended college, there are a lot of powerful people in powerful places with far less formal education. Alot of successful people recieve there greatest and best education from The School of Life or the The School of Hard Lessons. I guess you figured out by now that I am not impressed by ones level of formal education or GPA. Don't get me wrong I think that we should get an education and understand the importance of it, I guess I just don't put that much weight into it. There are far too many people that paid more for their education than they will earn in a lifetime. How stupid is that?....lol
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
29 Jul 08
I have always been taught that education and what you take away from it is EXTREMELY important. Actually a lot of people that I talk politics with believe that education is just as important as experience. Thanks for your response
1 person likes this
@ZephyrSun (7385)
• United States
29 Jul 08
Kennyrose, Does that mean that McCain and Bush are also wrong and/or dangerous since they have talked about a timeline of troop withdrawl? And, Bush has even went as far as to hire someone to get this all set up. I am starting to wonder if the only people that think it is dangerous is the people that do not have friends and family there in the war. I have stated many times before that I don't follow McCain, I've heard the basics the affair and whatnot, but if we are talking in general about "friends" as you list some of Obama's, the current President Bush was noted to be friends with a certain person from my state by the name of Tom Noe that embezzled millions of dollars from the states department of unemployment. Thanks for your comments
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