Bunny rabbits are fun to take care of.

@zebra2222 (5157)
United States
September 4, 2008 9:32am CST
Last spring, we took a large bunny rabbit home to take care of for the weekend. The bunny stays in our elementary school, but each student in the class can take the bunny home for the weekend. It was fun letting the bunny roam around and be petted and fed. My daughter enjoyed it and so did the rest of the family.
3 responses
@ljean791 (66)
• United States
4 Sep 08
I currently have a bunny. She's very funny to watch. She loves to toss her toys around and she does some really neat flips. She also goes nuts for yogurt treats, when she sees the bag she gets all excited and stands on her hind legs. She's a cutie.
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
8 Sep 08
Rabbits actually are not supposed to have dairy products. I know yogurt treats are marked for rabbits frequently, but these really aren't good for them. Try healthy veggies as treats instead. My rabbits enjoy "treats" of parsley, kale, and sometimes fresh strawberries from our garden. They get veggies daily, but enjoy them more than packaged treats. And for a rare treat, they absolutely go crazy for bits of banana. I love those flips they do! One of my rabbits used to be like a break dancer when he was younger, we called those "bunny dances" because it lasted a few minutes. Now he is 13 years old though and doesn't really do those anymore.
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
8 Sep 08
That sounds like such a good idea, but in reality the classroom pet experience often ends poorly. Some students will have parents ready to step up to the plate and care for the animal (like you guys). But others will take the pet home, not clean the cage and maybe even not care for it properly. When my younger brother was in preschool, the class had a guinea pig. Unfortunately as most class pets are, it was kept in too small of a cage. Our family would clean the cage daily on our turn. Some people never cleaned it. A lot of students didn't feed hay which is necessary for their diet because they didn't want to or were allergic. Others didn't feed veggies because they were asked to buy the veggies themselves. And then comes the problem of veterinary emergencies. If one occurs in the student's home, it is unlikely that the parents are going to fork over $500 or more to save the animal in the event of an illness or even an accident. Overall, the animal loses out in these situations and it doesn't teach children much about responsibility.
@smacksman (6074)
4 Sep 08
We had a bunny, Machismo, for our children and I built a small palace for it, two storey; ablution area; large run on the grass; the works. It was a bit grumpy when it got older and then we noticed bits of sparrow in his cage - the odd leg, a beak, a bit of wing! We thought he was being rather sweet letting the little birdies fly into his cage and eat his food. Hah! He was just waiting to catch one and eat it!! Yes, 'ickle bunny wunnies can be interesting pets!! haha