President during a depression greater than the Great Depression !!

@ronnyb (6120)
Jamaica
December 20, 2008 2:40am CST
Now my concern is ,is the president more concerned about the social implications of this or his place in history ?. * Where was this social conscience when he was just about to invade Iraq and unleash the worst crisis that that country has ever been through. * Where was this social conscience when he decided not to do anything about the genocide in Darfur when millions of people are being displaced from their homes and hundreds of thousand murdered ?. I am thinking that I would be more concerned about being the president that is sending thousands of my young people to die in the middle east for a baseless war . I am thinking that I wouldn’t want to be president of a country that is the champion of human rights and defender of the democracy and let this situation continue in one of the poorest countries in the word, why didn’t he invade them and bring democracy like he claimed he would do for Iraq ? Well maybe he found is "social conscience" after all and we should be thankful he did better later than never ,but I cant help but think maybe its just his place in history. What do you think
2 people like this
2 responses
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
21 Dec 08
Enjoy your time on the "Bash Bush Bus" because it's almost over. Granted, I'm sure you'll spend the next 4 to 8 years blaming Bush for everything Obama does wrong, but it'll get old fast. With two of your statements you've proven your hypocrisy and willingness to bash him no matter what he does. "* Where was this social conscience when he was just about to invade Iraq and unleash the worst crisis that that country has ever been through. * Where was this social conscience when he decided not to do anything about the genocide in Darfur when millions of people are being displaced from their homes and hundreds of thousand murdered?" So let me get this straight. He's a horrible person for sending troops into Iraq and ending the atrocities committed by Husein, but he's also a horrible person because he DIDN'T DO THAT IN DARFUR. Thank you for making it clear where you stand.
2 people like this
@ronnyb (6120)
• Jamaica
22 Dec 08
I am not a "bash bush" person it just seems to me that all of a sudden he seem to have this great love of people an humanity when all during his tenure ,this part of him seemed to be absent. I am also saying why was he so eager to end the atrocities of Iraq people which weren’t as severe as those in Darfur ,if humanitarian issues were what he was concerned about ,then to me Darfur would have been a bigger humanitarian crisis than Iraq. this leads me to think that there are other issues at play in the invasion of Iraq. Don’t get me wrong i am not against ending of Sadam’s rule but only if that was the real cause for his invading that country. I would hate to think that he was invading Iraq on these ground of humanitarianism when there was a more cynical plot ,perhaps even a personal one . In addition I also believe there are other issues at play when doesn’t want to be "the president during a depression, I think that he is more concerned about his place in history ,he doesn’t want to be remembered for that .Already Iraq is a scourge in his already checkered resume. Thank you for your comments I did see how my statements could have been misleading ,looking forward to more discussion on this issue .Have a good day.
1 person likes this
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
23 Dec 08
"I am not a "bash bush" person it just seems to me that all of a sudden he seem to have this great love of people an humanity when all during his tenure,this part of him seemed to be absent." It wasn't absent at all. What was absent was the media when it came to reporting his humanitarian efforts in Africa and all the resources he put behind AIDS research. The media is very selective in what they put out. You won't hear about Bush's humanitarian work just like you won't hear about Clinton's illegal war in Bosnia despite congress voting almost unanimously against it. http://www.dailybreeze.com/ci_11163761 http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2008-11/2008-11-13-voa5.cfm?CFID=82562658&CFTOKEN=88884967 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/129571.php http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/africa/ "I am also saying why was he so eager to end the atrocities of Iraq people which weren’t as severe as those in Darfur" But nobody believes Darfur has WMDs, nor have they EVER been known to have WMDs. Iraq used to have them and the many world leaders, not just Bush, believed they still had them and posed a big enough threat to be dealt with. "if humanitarian issues were what he was concerned about,then to me Darfur would have been a bigger humanitarian crisis than Iraq. this leads me to think that there are other issues at play in the invasion of Iraq." Of course there are other issues. WMDs were the primary reason for the invasion of Iraq. Darfur doesn't have them. We also don't get Sudanese terrorists attacking us like we do Arab terrorists. "Don’t get me wrong i am not against ending of Sadam’s rule but only if that was the real cause for his invading that country. I would hate to think that he was invading Iraq on these ground of humanitarianism when there was a more cynical plot,perhaps even a personal one." I don't think there was anything cynical involved. Ending Sadam's rules was one of several reasons he invaded Iraq. "I think that he is more concerned about his place in history,he doesn’t want to be remembered for that. Already Iraq is a scourge in his already checkered resume." If he were more concerned about his place in history he would have never went to war with Iraq. It was never popular and is especially unpopular now.
@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
23 Dec 08
Actually, here, let me show you what Bush has done for Darfur specifically. No, the media won't cover this. They are out to bash Bush and you actually have to seek out the truth to find it. The United States is the largest single donor to the people of Sudan, including to Darfur where more than 2.5 million are currently displaced. Humanitarian Aid and Human Rights. The United States is the leading international donor to Sudan, providing more than $5 billion in assistance to Sudan since 2005, including $3.7 billion in humanitarian and peacekeeping assistance to Darfur. In 2008, the United States provided half of the World Food Program's food aid request for more than 6 million people throughout Sudan and eastern Chad. In FY 2007, the United States gave more than $1 billion in assistance to the people of Sudan, including Darfur. * More than 30 U.S. Government partners are currently implementing programs to provide food, health, shelter, water, and other life-saving services, in the face of the many challenges caused by escalating banditry, bureaucratic impediments, and attacks on humanitarian staff. The United States also continues to promote efforts to ensure the safety and basic rights of Darfur's most vulnerable people. The United States has spearheaded a $16 million initiative to combat the widespread violence against women and girls and help communities to heal. The U.S. government supports radio programming in local languages on human rights issues and peace processes that are directed at persons displaced because of the conflict and other vulnerable populations in Darfur. Peacekeeping. The United States supports the rapid deployment of 26,000 United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) peacekeepers. Since 2004, the United States has spent more than $15 million to airlift 11,400 peacekeepers and their equipment to and from Darfur and has provided more than $100 million to train and equip those forces. Since 2004, direct and indirect U.S. support provided to peacekeeping operations in Darfur has totaled more than $600 million. The United States is paying more than one-fourth of the total cost of UNAMID through United Nations-assessed contributions, amounting to roughly $880 million through 2008. Over the past three years, the United States spent more than $450 million to build, operate, and maintain 34 peacekeeping base camps for African Union forces, which are now under the control of UNAMID. The United States also provides those troops with vehicles and communication equipment. * Earlier this year, the President made available $100 million in U.S. funding to augment the training and equipping of African peacekeepers pledged to deploy under UNAMID. Up to $40 million dollars of these new funds ensured that Rwanda's forces have the training and equipment they need to deploy four battalions (3,200 troops) to Darfur. Already, the United States has helped train more than 7,000 Rwandans for peacekeeping in Darfur and spent more than $40 million to ensure they are properly prepared, equipped, and on the ground. The United States is currently concluding negotiations with the United Nations to assist in airlifting essential heavy equipment and vehicles as part of an overall U.S. effort to expedite the deployment of UNAMID forces and increase their effectiveness once on the ground in Darfur. Economic Sanctions. Since violence erupted in Darfur in 2003, the United States has imposed economic sanctions on seven Sudanese individuals responsible for violence in Darfur and on more than 160 companies owned or controlled by the Government of Sudan (GOS). The United States continues to work to prevent the use of dollar-denominated transactions by the GOS or its parastatals. The United States has taken these steps to increase pressure on Khartoum to comply with its obligations to the international community and end the violence in Darfur. Political Process. The United States supports the efforts of the United Nations-African Union Joint Chief Mediator Bassolé in renewing a political process between the GOS and those rebel groups that did not sign the 2006 Darfur Peace Agreement (DPA), including through ongoing talks in Doha, Qatar. The United States supports a political solution to the ongoing Darfur conflict, including necessary security and compensation provisions as outlined in the DPA, which creates broad structures for an eventual outcome that will allow millions of Darfuris to return to their homes and rebuild their lives in peace. To create the conditions on the ground necessary for this to occur, the United States has offered to work with the GOS and UNAMID to establish a functional ceasefire monitoring mechanism to maintain security. To help spearhead the United States' efforts, President Bush named Richard S. Williamson as Special Envoy to Sudan on Dec. 21, 2007. Ambassador Williamson is the President's third Special Envoy for Sudan, following the service of Senator John Danforth and Andrew Natsios. http://www.whitehouse.gov/infocus/africa/