How do you treat the naughty students?

@my1341 (460)
China
March 13, 2009 11:33pm CST
There are some very naughty students in primary school? They always make mistakes like this or that Which make the teachers very upset. Sometimes their mind wanders during the class or they whisper to their parters to trouble others' study or even fight with their classmates during the break time. They often forget to do their exercise. The teacher usually ask them to the office in order to educate them to rectify their shortcomings. Though sometimes they may realize their mistakes and promise to correct. they may commit the same mistakes again and again later. How do you treat those naughty students?
6 responses
• United States
18 Mar 09
Sometimes kids misbehave to get attention. In this case, it is negative attention. Of course, this is not necessarily the problem. I used to do this because I wasn't getting the attention I wanted at home. I would be disruptive and then the teacher would make a big deal out of what I was doing wrong and then I had the attention of everyone in the room. It's ironic because I ended up teaching in a school for kids with behavior problems. All of my students were naughty. It important to establish a good relationship if possible. It is important that they understand that behavior is a choice. Make good choices, get good grades, good things happen. the opposite is also true. Other times, kids misbehave because they don't understand the material and are afraid to fail. Acting up creates a distraction and helps them avoid the failure. If it were me, I would take them aside in the office and rather than educate them on their shortcomings, I would ask THEM what they can do to improve themselves. Letting them come up with their own solution will make them more accountable for their actions. Another thing to do would be to tape a reminder to their desk or agree on a non-verbal signal for the student to remind him or her to get back on task. There are many ways to approach the problem. These are just some that have worked for me. I hope it works out for you!
@my1341 (460)
• China
18 Mar 09
Sounds interesting that you were a naughty boy in school but ended up with a teaching job in school. I think you know very clearly how the things go because you have acted those two characters. It's from your own practical experience. That's really a hard job but also challenging. As a teacher, we not only teach the students knowledge, but also how to behave properly. Just as a saying goes: Teaching the most glorious job under the sunshine. Good luck and have a nice day!
• United States
20 Mar 09
Thank you! It certainly does take an actor to know an actor! I use this to my advantage. I know that it certainly wouldn't have been out of the question for me to quit school, not go to college, get pregnant in high school, or any number of other not-so desirable outcomes. I was lucky enough to have a father to steer me in the right direction. Other kids aren't so lucky, so yes, teachers unfortunately are stuck having to teach children how to be people, too. We have to remember that sometimes we are the most stable adult in a child's life, which for me, is pretty scary. Sometimes this extra burden makes our curriculum suffer because we have to stop teaching our lesson and take some time to teach people-skills. I don't know if I missed in a previous post - are you a teacher too?
• United States
19 Mar 09
I find that if there is a way to connect to the student to show that you care about his/her success that they might give more effort to the teacher. If the student is bored with his/her work that might be another reason that he/sh is acting out against the teacher.
• United States
16 Mar 09
If the child is disrupting the class so the other children can't learn, I'd first give that child a warning. If that didn't work, I'd take away a privilege. If that didn't work, I'd call the child's parent(s) and have him/her come and get the child and tell the parent that he/she will be continued to be called to the school whenever the child behaves in this manner. If the parent(s) refused to come to school, I'd tell the parent(s) that I will have family and child services come for the child and the parent(s) could get the child at their location instead of at school and answer any questions that service might require before releasing the child to them. Now, I know in the real world I'd not be able to do that, but I do think when the situation gets too bad, the parents need to be involved in the discipline process. Maybe if the parents were called to the school every time the child misbehaves, the parents would make more of an effort to assure proper behavior from their child. Maybe I'm dreaming.
@j47lee (742)
• Canada
14 Mar 09
I have a nephew 5 years who used to hit other children in the class.... so what the teacher made him do is sit in a corner of the classroom by himself for a day... next day he quit hitting the other kids... that chair is called a thinking chair... so when the kid is made to sit there... it makes him different.... and this way he stops being naughty... so by punishing these kids... i dont think its going to work... this is a good way to educate kids... I have a nephew who is 4...he is also naughty sometimes... so what his mother do is .. when he is naughty she tell him if he wants to sit in a thinking chair.. make him sit in a corner of the room.... and he knows he's been naughty...so he says no mom lol... and that stops him from being naughty for a while..
• Thailand
14 Mar 09
I am a teacher and this is an everyday problem for me. I have realized that the students are not the problem, the problem lies with me. If I can make what I teach interesting to my students I get their attention and the problem goes away.
• Australia
14 Mar 09
I'm not a teacher but I do remember my primary school experience! I wasn't one of those children and I never got in trouble. But kids will be kids, I'd say just let them enjoy, make them work of course, but let them bludge a bit in primary before they hit highschool!