Can I grow a snowball bush from one that I have?

@dragon54u (27584)
United States
May 4, 2009 10:47pm CST
I would like to have some of these bushes but I have only one. Can I cut a branch and grow it in water then plant it? Or do I plant some of the flowers? I want to put some bushes outside my fence in the alley. Allies should be pretty for people to drive and walk through. I'm starting some morning glories but would also like some snowball bushes in one part and also along my fence. What's the best way to do this? I can't afford the high price of bushes from the nurseries so is there a way I can grow a few from the one I have?
4 people like this
4 responses
@mentalward (14716)
• United States
5 May 09
Hi, Dragon. I know you're received other responses, but I wanted to let you know of my success with rooting cuttings of bushes and trees. Right now, I have 10 cute tiny boxwood bushes that I created from 12 cuttings I took last Fall. It's really easy to do. Cutting right now aren't a good idea. The new growth is too new, too soft. The end of May is the perfect time to root softwood cuttings. I use a rooting hormone, but you don't need it. It helps to create new roots faster, but you can get roots without it. I use a soilless rooting mix, like a seed-starting mix. (WalMart sells it cheap. They also sell the rooting hormone.) Take cuttings, about 6 inches long and cut off the lower leaves, leaving maybe two sets of leaves on each cutting. I like to pinch off the very end of the cuttings, so more energy is going into creating roots and less into growing new leaves. Poke a pencil into the mix, then insert each cutting, one in each hole, about 3 inches down. Make sure to compact the mix around the cutting so there are no air pockets. (Watering it well does this just fine.) Keep your cuttings covered with plastic, allowing only a little air in for circulation. Keep the cuttings out of direct sunlight and keep them consistently moist, but not wet. Check every day to make sure they're not drying out. In a few weeks, you'll have new bushes, ready to plant anywhere you wish. It really is that easy! Oh, if you have a willow tree or willow bush, take some cuttings from it and put them in a vase or glass with water for a couple of days. You can use that water as a rooting hormone because willows produce it naturally. Just dip your new cuttings into the water, then put them into the soilless mix. You can do this with any bush or tree. I've created a new rose bush from one my son had and also started many new little ficus trees from one I've had for years. I used to trim it and throw the trimmings away but now that I know how to root them, I can't stand throwing any cuttings away. I feel like a murderer! LOL I've been giving away bushes and ficus trees for years now! Good luck! Oh, the other method I saw someone else mention, about making a slit and weighing it down in the soil, that works fine, too. Just make sure that the soil where the new roots are growing doesn't dry out because it will kill the tiny, new roots. I plan to use that method to propagate some honeysuckle vines from ones we have because I want to make a "natural fence" around our property, using chicken wire and having the vines grow up and through it until it can't be noticed anymore. If I were you, I'd take several cuttings, like I did with the boxwood. I wasn't sure about them since I had never tried propagating a boxwood before, so I took 12 cuttings. (They each only need about 1 inch of space to root.) Out of the 12, 10 grew roots. Now, I have to decide where I'm going to plant them all. LOL Well, I have promised a couple to a friend of mine who lives in Maryland and plan to take them to her when I get the chance, but that still leaves me with 8. I'm glad we have a large lot! Again, good luck and have fun! Once you've rooted cuttings, you'll want to do it with everything you see. I'm always "stealing" cuttings from bushes I notice when I'm out and about. Of course, if they're on land where someone lives, I always ask and so far everyone I've asked has said sure, take all you want. A GREAT website to learn about rooting cuttings and a lot of great FREE information about gardening is called www.freeplants.com. You don't have to join anything, but I did (it's free) to get the daily newsletters that always have great gardening tips.
@dragon54u (27584)
• United States
6 May 09
Wow, thanks!! I put a reminder on my Mini Minder to made some cuttings on June 3, just to be safe. I'll look for the rooting stuff at Walmart, too. I just can't bring myself to spend $10-30 on those bushes at the nurseries! I'll be asking my neighbor for some lilac cuttings now that I know (thanks to you and others) how to do it.
1 person likes this
@wildcat48 (782)
• United States
6 May 09
From what I read you can use cuttings from the snowball bush and gently take a sharp knife and scratch the bark about 3 inches from the bottom then dip in a rooting hormone and stick it in some perlite, or very loose, well draining soil. By using the knife and scratching up the bark it seems to grow roots better that way and higher up on the stem then just a inch from the bottom. We are going to try to start some Lilac bushes which were one of my mothers favorites.
2 people like this
@dragon54u (27584)
• United States
6 May 09
I love lilacs! My neighbor has 3 bushes and I'm going to ask her if I can have some cuttings. I should go get some of the rooting hormone. Thanks for the tip about the bark!
1 person likes this
• United States
6 May 09
Your welcome and good luck with your flower bushes. They are very lovely and a great way to scent the air and make a yard beautiful..
1 person likes this
@mentalward (14716)
• United States
7 May 09
There's an easier way to get lilacs. They grow shoots from the roots, usually growing around the main bush a few inches all around. If you take a sharp knife and "cut" into the dirt between the main bush and one or two of the new shoots, you can get little "mini bushes" complete with roots; small roots, to be sure, but roots. If you plant these little guys in fertile soil, they'll grow right away (just be sure to keep them watered until the roots get established). I got my white lilac bush that way. There's a place I used to go fishing that had some white lilac bushes and, one Spring, I noticed these new shoots poking out of the ground so I took my fillet knife (an essential for fishing!), cut down, kinda sawing-like, and got a few of these shoots. Being new at this, I planted them in a pot on my deck and made sure they didn't dry out. After a few days, the shoots perked up and began growing new leaves. That bush is now about 5 feet tall and sending out it's own new shoots. Just thought I'd add my two cents. You can grow them by taking cuttings also, dipping them in the rooting hormone and waiting 3 or 4 weeks, like wildcat said. I guess I'm kinda lazy or impatient when it comes to lilacs, so I always cut the new shoots at the base of the bush because they start growing even faster.
2 people like this
@suspenseful (40331)
• Canada
5 May 09
I checked on the net and it seems that if you cut a nick in the underside of a lower branch and weigh it down and allow it to root. Anyway here is the page with the instructions. Just go down to Leo's question. http://www.recipegoldmine.com/gardengaryS/snowball-bushes.html That might work.
@dragon54u (27584)
• United States
5 May 09
That page is a goldmine of information! Thank you so much for looking that up for me, I'll try that way and a cutting--one of them is bound to take!
2 people like this
@suspenseful (40331)
• Canada
6 May 09
I am not much of a gardener. Most of what I grow is just by luck, but that should work. And thanks for the best response.
1 person likes this
@webeishere (36378)
• United States
5 May 09
Dig it up and split the rootball to make 2 or more plants. Then transplant them. You usually won't get flowers the next year from them though. I have one as well in my backyard that was cut from another. HAPPY POSTINGS FROM GRANDPA BOB!!~
2 people like this
@dragon54u (27584)
• United States
5 May 09
I don't think I can do that. It's right beside what I think is a cistern, confined space by the back steps with very little space around it--I'd probably kill the poor thing trying to dig it up. Thanks, though, I'll keep that in mind for other projects.
1 person likes this