+++++ Empty stores seeming to be becoming more common now! +++++

May 29, 2009 4:40pm CST
Went to a city called Exeter in the county of Devon, England, last Tuesday. I was a little surprised how many empty stores there were - probably not more than half a dozen (six), but still it was a bit of a shock as normally this usually thriving "down town" usually has now empty shop fronts. It is practical details like these, that hit home to the reality of the world wide recession, down turn - some might even say it is the worst since the great depression of the 30's. Is this something you have noticed, in your area? Or are there other things that giving you a cold splash of water on the face, waking you up to today's "reality"? YOUR RESPONSES, LADIES AND GENTLEMAN PLEASE!
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9 responses
@heathcliff (1415)
• United States
29 May 09
Around me I've noticed entire downtown areas basically deserted, but at the same time, I've seen hundreds of new business constructions and extremely crowded shopping areas in different areas. Business has changed, but is not missing. Companies need to change to remain profitable, but several compananies are making VERY bad decisions driving alot of people to fear for the financial future. An unnecessary panic is starting, though people should be watching company leaders alot closer than they have been!
29 May 09
Yes, I would concur with what you're saying here. In the UK, probably in the US too, the bigger businesses, particularly supermarkets, are still increasing their profits, though adjusting their 'offer' to today's more bargain conscious consumer. Overall, there is a downturn, but the businesses that can stay flexible and adjust quickly to the changing markets, will manage to keep going - providing their in the right market segments! Hope that makes some kinda sense! And yes, people at times do unnecessarily panic, though in the uncertain times we're in, it can be quite forgiveable! Will we get deflation or inflation or even hyper-inflation? With the amount of public debt the US and UK governments have, it's anyone's guess! Thanks for a thoughtful response...
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@LittleMel (14059)
• Canada
30 May 09
I noticed a couple more buildings on lease and houses on sale or sold. I don't go out much except for grocery and weekends so I might miss out some things. Last year in spring and summer I went out quite often for fishing etc, but this year we are tightening our budget so I don't go out as much anymore. Hubby said he noticed empty parking lots too, in front of offices and factories.
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@kelpie (191)
• United States
29 May 09
The flea market that my dad has his business in is majorly empty now. There are businesses that were there for 4-5+ years that just packed up and left this year. It was sad to see them go. The economy hit hard in Wichita, Kansas, because it is still very tight around the aircraft businesses. Cessna is looking to sell, all aircraft industries laid off a major 10-20k people. And no temp job agencies are available, they say they don't even know if they'll have spots available next year, even. Here in colorado, where I live now, I haven't seen a major hit like Kansas, but there lots of houses for sale and lots of space for leasing. The malls seem to be holding strong, except for the desperate people in their kiosks.
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31 May 09
I am from Surrey and I notice that shops seem to be closing down week after week. A lot of retail outlets have been hit by the recession and credit crunch, and unfortunately a lot of stores have had to close. When these shops do close, they seem to stay empty for months.
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1 Jun 09
Everyone seems to have put in really interesting responses, too many to reply individually to each one, though they have all got + markings! I'm wondering what your gender is kiss_me2070? With you being from Surrey, I guess the county has been badly hit by the financial slowdown in the 'city', as I think you have a lot of "stockbroker" country close to you! Thanks for your response.
@CMTS_87 (1342)
• Philippines
31 May 09
I think this global crisis is giving everyone a hard time. And yes, closing down of establishments in different areas around the world is a normal thing nowadays. But of course we really need to work hard, as in very hard, to withstand this very challenging reality. Happy MyLotting!
1 Jun 09
As well as working hard, we also need to work smart. More than ever, we need flexibility and initiative to adjust to the increasing pace of change and be prepared to change our ways of working, what we produce or provide as a service. Maybe it is an idea to do some extra training, stop making or providing a part of our product range or service which is not so financially rewarding. Sometime tough decisions are called for... but in the long run, these decisions could be life savers! You're certainly right, that most of us are in a very challenging reality! Thanks... CMTS
@maximax8 (27048)
30 May 09
In my local high street about six shops have closed down, including estate agents and a travel agency. I go shopping really often to Weston super Mare and at least ten shops have closed down there. I feel upset every time I walk past Woolworths because it has closed down and it used to be one of my favorite shops. Before Christmas I went shopping in Taunton and went into Woolworths. I had a delightful time shopping there because they were selling toys with a special deal: buy two and get another free. So I was able to get some lovely presents for my two nephews and my oldest niece. I used to go to a great shop in Weston super Mare that sold stationary but it closed down. I now have to go to Bristol to get the albums I use to store my postcards. I wonder which will be the next shops to close down. It is a scary situation and feel worried that this current recession is far worse than the one that happened in 1991.
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1 Jun 09
Yes, it seemed like "Woolies" has been around for ever. Unfortunately it has just not kept up with the times, the present economic climate has just delivered the "knock out punch". In recent years the supermarkets have all greatly expanded their non-food lines, Tesco, Sainsbury's, Asda (owned by Walmart) especially, seem to sell many of the things that Woolworths used to sell, and at greater convenience and lower prices! Another area where Woolworths have suffered is recorded music. With so many people downloading tracks and albums from the internet, this has really decimated Woolies trade. I think shops like Boots and W H Smiths have also been struggling. Of course something that has been happening for many years is the decline of independent shops, as the "squeeze" has increased from more and bigger supermarkets opening, new shopping centres/ malls opening with mainly 'chain' stores. I think that this current recession/ depression will be worse than in 1991, but I refused to be scared by it and will just learn to adapt to the more challenging times that all of us, have ahead of us. In some ways things could improve; as we get materially poorer, people will turn to each other for help more and so a greater sense of community should arise. When "peak oil" really kicks in, we will probably see quite a bit of "the end of the world as we know it" stuff from the media. If anything, I think that the times will definitely get more interesting.
@suzzy3 (8388)
3 Jun 09
I have been away at Hythe in kent and it is the same there.Lovely little shops shutting down and empty premises,Seaside towns rely on the little shops it is part of there charm ,had some lovely fish and chips there,still well worth a visit.Shops in our local town of maidstone are shutting down as well, here we go hold on tight.
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@savypat (20248)
• United States
30 May 09
I had a rare occasion to drive around the big city near me and was astounded at how many businesses are gone, buildings now for rent. It does bring home how bad things are getting. I have just been focused on the amount of food we need to feed the hungry in our County.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 May 09
I've pretty much seen the same thing you have. It's harder for businesses to thrive in this kind of economy. I remember I was visiting the mall near my home, and there were iron bars over many of the storefronts, save for the major department stores on the ends of the building. However, it seems that it's certain parts of the country that are getting hit, and Illinois is one of them, considering the amount of corruption in that state. What adds insult to injury is that no one is hiring anymore, so it's incredibly difficult to find work.
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