Did you know that a blade of grass can cut you pretty badly?

@mentalward (14695)
United States
July 9, 2009 8:42am CST
I didn't, at least not until yesterday. I have shade-loving flowers planted around our big oak tree out front and, since we haven't had rain in a week (yeah, really, a whole week!) I went out to water them. Noticing that some crabgrass was growing rather tall near the flowers, I bent down to pick it. I hadn't worn my gardening gloves because all I was planning on doing was watering flowers. I must advise you all right now that you should NEVER try to pull up crabgrass with wet hands! This rather long (about 12 inches) blade of grass slipped through my hand as I tried to pull it up and cut my hand in three places pretty badly! And, oh yeah, it HURT!!! Worse than a paper cut, I must say. Deeper, too. Bleeding pretty badly, I had to go inside and bandage the three deep cuts, one on the webbing between thumb and forefinger, one across the palm and one on my poor little pinky finger. Oh, and if you're ever in the market for triple-antibiotic ointment, I suggest you get the kind that relieves pain, too. It really helps! Okay, now you tell me some stupid story of yours that has happened while gardening. PLEASE tell me I'm not the only one! Or, am I?
7 people like this
19 responses
@schulzie (4064)
• United States
15 Jul 09
Ouch! That sounds so painful! I never realized that grass could cut your hand like that! I guess you learn something new every day. I hope that now it has been a week since this happened that your cuts have healed up or have begun to heal up. Thanks for letting us know about this potential hazard in the garden! I would really have never realized that such a thing was possible. Hope you're feeling better. Have a great day and happy myLotting!!!
@scheng1 (24741)
• Singapore
10 Jul 09
So sorry to hear that, hope you are better now. Come to think of it, so far nobody has written anything about "how to murder with a blade of crabgrass", maybe you can write a thriller about it. I guess this thriller will be the bestseller for many years. I doubt any detective to find that the murder weapon is a blade of grass!
1 person likes this
@commanderxo (1496)
• Canada
9 Jul 09
Just think...if you were an amateur "green-thumber", it probably would have been cut off long ago. (hehehehehe) Yes...it DOES hurt! Me too. I've done this once or twice myself; not thinking; just in too much of a hurry I guess. I hope you've never thought of taking up knitting? (-smile-) cdrxo
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Ha ha. Funny! I do knit, actually. I've been very lucky so far with them... no sitting on them, no stabbing my arms, hands, face, anything! Also, I learned that the knitting needles are GREAT for reaching that itch you always get when you have a cast on your arm or leg! My hands were wet from watering the garden. I've watered it before with my gloves on and they always got soaked... and these gloves are leather! They take forever to dry. So, I learned that water, bare hands and grass don't mix well. One of the cuts is right on the webbing between my thumb and forefinger. I've tried taking the bandage off to let the air get to it, but it keeps reopening and that HURTS! Almost as much as when it first happened. Man! Was that ever a surprise! I knew you could make an obnoxious noise with a blade of grass, but never thought it could cut flesh down to the bone! Okay, it didn't cut down to the bone but it sure did bleed! I had no idea that grass could be so dangerous!
1 person likes this
• Canada
9 Jul 09
Ninja grass...that's funny. Hahahaha. Yeah, joint cuts ARE really hurtful, indeed. Have you got any Polysporin? I find that it helps heal cuts much faster. Oh...and since you seem to be "a bleeder", and enjoy baths over showers...it made me wonder what color your bath water must have looked like. I'm not partial to baths; don't like sitting in my own dirt. Then again, I'm not much of a gardener either. Well, chalk it all up to experience girl. At least you can be the first lady gardener ever to say; "Green thumb? Shucks no. I have a RED thumb!" cdrxo
• Canada
12 Jul 09
Consider yourself lucky this time. I hear Virginia Blue Ridge crabgrass, "stems" from a "wild" background. ;-) Heal quickly girl. cdrxo
@rdadey (484)
• Canada
9 Jul 09
ATTACK OF THE KILLER GRASS!!! Well, I guess we don't need any ointment now that our test dummy has done it's job...LOL. I'm just kidding. I bet it did hurt but hopefully not for long. I was cleaning up some sting needles for my aunt and ripped the length of my forearm open. Made up some good cussing words that time. Best to wear sleeves and gloves when doing even simple yard work.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Yeah, "test dummy" is what I feel like right now. Glad I could help to raise garden disaster awareness! I've been fortunate in not ever ripping open any of my flesh as much as you did. I you HADN'T cussed then, I'd have to call you a saint! Glad to hear you lived through the ordeal! I've had plenty of little scratches from wild rose bushes, plus my blackberry and raspberry bushes and also the ever-present thistles but never anything as severe as what you experienced! OUCH!!! [EXPLETIVE]!!! [EXPLETIVE]!!! I basically yelled out some kind of noise but I don't remember cussing. Probably just something as ordinary and mundane as "Oww!" then stared at it for a minute or so because I couldn't believe what had just happened. My brain just didn't want to register it! I've been gardening for a good 40 years now and this has never happened before. Once the blood started dripping, though, I thought I ought to get inside and get patched up. I have garden gloves made of leather (because of the many prickly things around here) and they just get wet whenever I water the plants so that's the reason I wasn't wearing them. BUT, no more grass pulling for me without gloves! The crabgrass will just have to wait from now on until I've finished watering and put my gloves on. It's just that, well, you know, I was right there, the grass was right there, so... it just made sense to pull it up and be done with it. I am very glad, however, that no one saw me do this. I was embarrassed enough! Awesome advice to wear long sleeves and gloves for ALL gardening work. Believe me, I'll remember that!
1 person likes this
@rdadey (484)
• Canada
9 Jul 09
Thanks for sharing. We have some memories we keep alive inside and now have shared them. It did make me drift back in time to think about some people who are no longer alive.
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
10 Jul 09
well, I'm not a gardner, but I could'a told ya that grass can cut! Yes, I have been cut by a blade (or two) of grass, tho never as seriously as you have... I strongly suggest that you also get some Carmex and keep the cuts lubricated with it. The problem with these cuts is that the edges dry and spread and they become even more painful and heal more slowly. The Carmex will help kep the edges moist and they will heal from the inside out. This, mind you, I learned as someone who dealt DAILY with paper and some serious paper cuts. The Carmex also helps with hang nails, trust me, it works. About the only time I spent a lot of time working in the yard was the year I went out and pulled up all the dandylions that were growing on one side of the house. The next time, after the 1999 remodel, I used herbacide to deal with them. Anyway, when I dealt with the dandy's, I used gloves, and I hate garden gloves, but I knew dandylions were stickery....
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
10 Jul 09
Yeah, I hate wearing garden gloves, too, but I know now that wearing them is a smart thing to do. I've only used herbicides on the poison ivy around here. Living in the mountains, with about one acre or so of wooded area, we have a LOT of poison ivy and I don't want to touch it, not even with gloves on. I use Neosporin with pain reliever. It works great! It's probably much like Carmex in that it's an ointment and prevents the edges of the cuts from drying out. It also helps relieve most of the pain, which is always a bonus! LOL Many, many, MANY moons ago, I was a file clerk. The file room was large and carpeted. Not only did I have to contend with the constant paper cuts, but also getting static shocks from walking on that carpet and touching the file cabinets! A couple of mean, sadistic people who worked there (men, naturally) loved to come into the file room, shuffle their feet along the carpet, then touch me just to shock me. Idiots! I always had a ready supply of Neosporin and Bandaids at work with me. I also learned, quite fast, to always have a can of Static Guard with me!
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60894)
• United States
14 Jul 09
I did too, back about 30 years ago - without the sadistic men... I would keep my keys out and use them to touch the metal cases with the keys to bleed off the worst of the static - generally only a problem in the winter... I would've pulled them in 1999, but by then I was already deeply in pain from the fibro, and didn't want to also be in pain from the 3 foot tall sticky dandies too, I sprayed them down and killed them. I spent a few years going thru my yard pulling up the sticker plants and for a long time didn't have any of them growing, but since the fibro, that's all gone to hell in a hand basket.
• Regina, Saskatchewan
9 Jul 09
LOL, let's see............where to begin? My brothers and I used to hold a blade of grass between our thumbs, bring it up to our mouths and blow! It made quite a screeching sound, but it also cut your lips if you weren't careful. And you know how the grass seems to grow higher along the edge of your gardens? Always the tough grass too, like crabgrass. Well I hate weed eaters, because they are always messing up on me, or I get the cord tangled, so I get down on my hands and knees with a pair of scissors and cut the grass by hand along the garden edges. At my old house my neighbours used to come out on their porches and watch me crawl around the lawn with my little scissors and, frankly, laugh at me! LOL But we won prizes every year in the community in bloom competition! And I learned a long time ago, that to remove weeds and other unwanted growths in my lawn and gardens, that actually the best time to do it is after a rain when the ground is softer. The trick is to grab, and TWIST and then pull. Everything comes out so much easier and you don't get hurt.............but then a good pair of well fitting garden gloves helps too! LOL
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
My sister and I used to do that with grass all the time, too. Ah, such music to the ears, eh? NOT! LOL Luckily, I never cut my lip on it. I had no idea it could cut so badly! The worst of it is right in the webbing between my thumb and forefinger. Each time I take the bandage off, it splits open again. I'm leaving the bandage on for awhile this time. I've cut that tall grass around bushes and stuff with scissors before. After the last time, though, never again! I got such a blister on my thumb! It could be because I'm left-handed and most scissors are angled for right-handers. NOT FAIR! It was also partly because I didn't have my gloves on then, either. The thing I do that has the neighbors thinking I've lost ALL my marbles is I'll pick clover out of the grass... by hand. I HATE clover! It spreads like crazy and kills the grass. But, I also like my earthworms so I don't want to use any weedkiller on it. The only weedkiller I use is on the massive amounts of poison ivy we have in the wooded areas of our property. I don't even want to touch that with my leather gloves and long sleeves! So, grabbing, twisting, then pulling is the secret, huh? Awesome! I know that it's easier to pull weeds when the ground is wet and that's usually the time when I do my weeding, after a rain or when I've given everything a good soaking with the hose. BUT, I'll NEVER do it without gloves again! I love gardening without gloves. For some reason, I like feeling the dirt. I have nail brushes at every sink in the house because of that. LOL BUT, after cutting my hand open with that grass, getting that blister from the scissors and also from hearing of the potential for getting sick or even dying from certain bacteria found in soil, I always use my gloves, at least when I KNOW I'll be pulling weeds or anything besides just watering plants. Maybe I should just carry the gloves outside with me when I only plan to water the plants from now on. Aha! I've just had an epiphany!!!
1 person likes this
• Regina, Saskatchewan
9 Jul 09
My brother's used to wake me up on Saturday mornings blowing grass in my ears! LOL And yep, established weeds or other undesirables (like dandylions) come out much better with grabbing them close to the ground and twisting before you pull. Last week the hubs and I pulled out hundreds of weeds along the outside of our picket fence line in about half an hour using the twist method. It was just after a strong rain, but I've also found that if I water the gardens or lawn and wait a few minutes for it to soak in, I can do the weeding much easier then too. I also like the feel of the dirt on my hands, but I reserve that for planting. The rest of the time I use my gardening gloves. And YES, most definitely, nail brushes at every sink! lol
@neildc (17253)
• Lapu-Lapu City, Philippines
9 Jul 09
dear mentalward, i am not into gardening now that i am a family man and busy with office work and mylot. but i some memories during childhood. as a child at school, we do some cleaning of the school compound. grasses grow and always pop-out everywhere. and when we were pulling grasses one time, it was a wet day. then i pulled the grass, wet grass that when i did pull them, my hands slip. minor cuts but teacher madam brought me to the clinic to have the cuts cleaned and put some red med that i know what was that. it just took 2 days if i can recall, to heal the wounds. neil
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Well, although I'm happy to know that I am not the only person this has happened to, I still feel badly that you were cut by grass as a child! I'm glad it healed fast, too! My cuts are pretty deep. I like taking baths over showering and last night's bath had my hand stinging pretty badly! I found out that it's not easy washing your hair with only one hand! Not impossible, just very difficult. My cuts are still pretty sore today. I tried taking the bandage off and am happy to say that the cut on my pinky finger doesn't hurt today and that one plus the cut across the palm of my hand are now bandage-free. But, the cut on the webbing between my thumb and forefinger still hurts pretty bad! I kept the bandage on that one because, with us constantly using our thumbs, that cut kept reopening. I'll keep it bandaged for another day or two. I've learned a big lesson! I will NEVER again try to pull any weeds without my gloves on! I didn't have them on because I was just planning to water the garden, not do any weeding. From now on, I'll resist the urge to pull any grass or weeds until I have my gloves on!
@neildc (17253)
• Lapu-Lapu City, Philippines
10 Jul 09
oh yes dear mentalward, that learned us a lesson. the next time we have to do that thing again, we already know that we should do. we learned a lot with our mistakes.
@leenie50 (3992)
• United States
10 Jul 09
Hey Marti, All I can say is OUCH!!! You poor baby. You have some pretty tough grass growing. When I found Neosporin with a pain killer in it, I was thrilled. Cuts on the hands especially are the most painful and that stuff really works. I have to say that I have never been cut by grass. Thanks for the warning sweetie. I hope your hand gets better real soon. Hugsssssss leenie
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
10 Jul 09
Hi leenie! The cuts are much better today. I've been using Neosporin with pain reliever. I LOVE that stuff! I'm taking a different approach to the crabgrass from now on and wearing gloves whenever I go near it for one thing. I'm also going to be using a herbicide on them because we really don't have too much crabgrass, thank goodness! I've been using a herbicide on the poison ivy and don't normally like using it everywhere because I don't want to kill any earthworms or good bugs like ladybugs or praying mantis. BUT, now that I know I have killer crabgrass, I'll be getting rid of it with chemicals. I'll teach it who the boss is around here!
@krajibg (11936)
• Guwahati, India
10 Jul 09
Hi there, Yes I do have this experience and that too several times. It is not only crab grass all grass in this category are dangerous I rather say. They cut deep if you happen to trying to pull up and it gone slipped. This is the fingers specially which are more effected by this grass. Hope by now you have got them healed.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
10 Jul 09
Thank you, krajibg. They're healing nicely. I made sure to clean the cuts and bandage them until they were well closed. I've taken the bandages off of them now and they appear to be healing nicely. I just have to remember to wear those gloves from now on! LOL
@JenInTN (27564)
• United States
9 Jul 09
I have cut myself with a blade of grass too! It's like a bad paper cut.It really hurts. I was pulling weeds and cut mine once. It was sore for a couple of days and would burn like crazy when I washed my hands..lol..you are not alone. I just wish I had gotten the pain relieving ointment.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Definitely get the kind with the pain reliever in it next time! It's worth it! I know all about that stinging. When I first cleaned it, when I washed dishes and when I took my bath... OUCH!!!!!!!!! It's definitely like a paper cut with a really bad attitude! Although I'm sorry to hear that you also got cut by grass, I'm very glad to know that I'm not the only one! LOL
• United States
9 Jul 09
No you're not the only one who has been attacked by grass. I actually have a friend who fell on a particularly sharp piece of grass and it stabbed him through the heart. He had to go to the hospital and he was in critical condition for a couple days. He finally made a full recovery and to this day, we stay far far away from those deadly blades of grass.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
I knew it! I KNEW I wasn't imagining things! That thing attacked me! As another myLotter put it, "Attack of the Killer Grass"! From now on, I'm sending my dogs in first, just to put fear into that grass's heart! Maybe come at it in full body armor and a weed wacker! Maybe a machete even! Yeah! I'll teach that grass who's boss!
• United States
9 Jul 09
Yes, I have been cut by grass too. I think it depends on the type of grass... some is too thin, or fine, to cut you but there are some kinds that can cut rather easily! Perhaps that is why it is called a "blade" of grass!! Haha!!
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Yes! It's definitely as sharp as any other type of blade! I had never thought about it that way before but I sure won't be forgetting it now! I love nice, soft, thick grass but this crabgrass is more than just a nuisance... it's dangerous! Once my hand heals, I'll be showing it who the real boss is! Full body armor, leather gloves and a weed wacker... it won't know what hit it. LOL
@Bandeed (82)
• Australia
9 Jul 09
Yep all of us have to find out the hardway when you make the mistake you learn somethings but i didnt know that grass blades were really sharp i do know they have sharp sides but thats werid
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
I think most of us have gotten little cuts from running through grass but this was horrible! It cut really deep, much deeper than I would have expected! Well, I now know just how dangerous crabgrass can be so I'll be sure to use extra precautions next time. I won't be pulling on it without gloves on any more! Learning from our mistakes is probably the best way to learn. It's those mistakes we never forget. I've learned, believe me! LOL
@Chevee (5915)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Oh yes, I am very much aware of this. Living and growing up in the south and having to play outside a lots. I have encountered many crab grass cuts. And your discussions bring back a lot of childhood memories. We would even play hide-n-seek in those tall crab grass fields. I don't have many of those kind of gardening stories. Just one, I can think of lately. My daughter has a fence around her home and the neighbor that lives on the other side of the fence has a lot of flowers that grows through the fence and into my daughter's yard. Well I have to admit I did go and dig up some of those flowers and brought them home and planted them in my yard. My daughter isn't a flower person so when she mows her lawn she just mows the plants down. So why not take advantage and multiply my plant population.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Hi, Chevee! Long time no see! I hope all is well with you. I do like your thinking! Quite a lot of my flowers and even some bushes I've gotten from neighbors, friends, family or just found on the roadside! Shhhhh! Don't tell, but I got my white lilac bush from a cutting I took from a bush in a public park. I went there often to go fishing and noticed a bunch of white lilac bushes and also noticed that they would cut down all the little shoots that grew from the roots of the main bushes. So, once I took an old knife with me and cut into the dirt between the bush and a couple of the shoots so I'd get some of the root and planted those cuttings. I've even moved them... twice! They are now one beautiful bush, growing larger every year. I asked my son's landlord (years ago) if I could have some of the bamboo she had in her yard and she told me to help myself, so I did. I've traded so many different kinds of flowers with people over the years that I really never have had to buy any, but I always end up buying new things each year, anyway. Well, except this year because of finances. But, I have "borrowed" some cuttings from some pretty bushes I've seen around here and rooted them. I think every community should have something like a flower exchange or seed exchange somewhere near the end of the season, or early in the Spring. It would be so cool to get all kinds of different flowers, basically for free, with all it taking is a little of our time to dig up some of our own to trade. Hmmm... I think I might just try to get something like that started! Right now, I'm collecting seeds from my Columbine flowers. I have about 3 different types and they're growing like weeds! I initially wanted to just keep the seeds from planting themselves because I have so many of them that have already planted themselves but I'm now saving the seeds. If you'd like some, just say the word and I'll send you some. They're shade-loving flowers and will grow where nothing else would. You know, it really hurts me when I see people mowing down flowers, although I do understand that some people just aren't gardeners. If I have something growing where it shouldn't be, I'll do my best to transplant it to a better spot. I'm glad you've taken some home to give them a chance!
@MNRFOLEY (223)
• Australia
9 Jul 09
Yes they do, and I did the same mistake before not wearing my gloves and tried pulling them out boy I had sore palms and fingers after plus of course the bloody mess, silly me lol!.yeah better to use gloves all the time when working in the garden! :)
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Whew! It's nice to know I'm not the only one this has happened to! I'm going to buy another pair of gardening gloves (mine are leather because of all the prickly things we have around here) and keep one pair near each door. Also, no matter what I'm planning on doing outside, I'll take those gloves with me! Sometimes, when I've come back from the grocery store or any other place, as long as I don't have too much to carry, I'll bend over and scoop up a weed or two on my way into the house. NEVER AGAIN! I've learned my lesson! LOL
@winterose (39918)
• Canada
9 Jul 09
wow this is something, I never really thought about it, but then again it does makes sense that a blade of grass could cut, I mean we can even get cut from a piece of paper. I hope you get to feeling good soon.
@mentalward (14695)
• United States
9 Jul 09
Thanks so much, winterose. I'm doing my best to keep the cuts clean and protected. I also use Neosporin (triple-antibiotic) with pain killer. It really does help to reduce the pain. Now I know why we call them "blades" of grass! They're as sharp as any other blade!
• United States
6 Jan 16
You lie!!!! I thought so, until I heard you mention CRABGRASS!! Well yes, that explains it!!
• United States
14 Jul 09
i never would have thought it would have cut you either! thats creepy!
@DawGwath (1044)
• Romania
10 Jul 09
Well if paper can cut you, why not grass? If my memory doesn't trick me, I recall cutting myself with grass as a crazy child that I was, but many stupid things used to happen to me, so there was no psychological trauma involved (or at least I hope so :D ).