How much to MyLotters know about Type 1 (or Juvenile) Diabetes?

United States
July 9, 2009 5:41pm CST
As many of you may have known, nearly three years ago, my brother passed away from complications due to having Type 1, or Juvenile, Diabetes. My brother's father had the the gene for Type 1 Diabetes and my brother's great uncle died at the age of four from Type 1 Diabetes. Type 1 Diabetes is genetic. Diabetes affects you both mentally and physically. It can cause you to feel depressed, have a poor self image of yourself, and make you feel drained and tired most of the time. You can get skin infections from the shots, the glucose/blood sugar level prickers, and from the pumps. Type 1 Diabetes affects people of all ages, anyone at any age can get it, so long as someone in your family has the gene. The gene for Type 1 Diabetes has been found, but not the trigger for the gene, generally what causes the gene to go off. Most people don't know that when a person with Type 1 Diabetes goes into hypoglycemia they can look like a drunk, or look like they are asleep. When a Type 1 Diabetic goes into hypoglycemia, giving them honey, or anything with sugar in it that their lips will absorb is not the only solution to getting them out of unconsciousness, but giving them a glucose shot works as well. Most people know more about AIDS, HIV, Cancer, and other diseases and conditions than they do about Type 1 Diabetes. So, how many people on here know a Type 1 Diabetic or know anything about Type 1 Diabetes?
4 responses
• Philippines
21 Jul 09
I love the topic Diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also known as Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus is commonly seen in people within ideal body weight or mostly slim. It's incidence is just 10% compared to Type 2 which has 90% incidence. Type 1 is of course treated with insulin as it is very obvious in the name alone. Diet and exercise can also bring a big help not only in Type 1 but on Type 2 as well. Hope that helps!
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Jul 09
Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease most common in children and/or young adults that have inherited the disease and the body does not produce insulin. Type 2 is most commonly seen adults and is controlled by either medication or diet and exercise or a combination of both. Most who develop Type 1 Diabetes are otherwise healthy and at a healthy weight when diagnosed, but can lose weight quickly and dangerously if not diagnosed right away. With that said, the mostly slim part of your statement most commonly comes from not being diagnosed right away or even being misdiagnosed.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Jul 09
Yes, that information is correct, but it all sounds like it came off of Wikipedia or a Medical website.
• United States
22 Jul 09
I did a lot of research on it when me and my husband first started dating before we got married and also took medical courses to be a medical assistant in the clinic. I was mainly letting babyfiona know that being mostly slim in a person that has it can be due to not being diagnosed right away or not being diagnosed properly, that's all.
• United States
21 Jul 09
My husband was a 29 year Juvenile Diabetic until three years ago when he had a double transplant of a kidney and pancreas. He is no longer a diabetic but does have to monitor blood sugar on a regular basis in addition to his labwork that he has to do every few months since the transplant. He was in end stage kidney failure and on dialysis when he got on the transplant list. Before the transplant, he hated his life mainly because he was limited in what he could do. He worked just as hard as the next person up until his kidneys started failing then he went on disability and dialysis. I can't tell you how many times I witnessed him having seizures due to low blood sugar and once he was almost placed under arrest because he was "out of it" and refusing treatment and had become violent, but that was due to low blood sugar. I also witnessed it when his blood sugar was high and he was irritable until he could get it back down. It was heart wrenching for me because there was nothing I could do for him except try to get him stable until paramedics got to him. He never had the pump because the doctor told him that it can deliver insulin when it wasn't necessary. Yes, it can be devastating physically and mentally but a lot of times it depends on the individual and their doctor to make the determination of the person's limitations. I am in no way saying that your brother didn't do that, but I do know that for my husband, the depression didn't really set in until he had to quit work because that was his being was to work and do what he loved to do. Now, instead of an insulin bottle to carry around he has a daily bottle with anti-rejection meds and visits to the transplant clinic every few months for checkups on his organs and medication levels. My brother has type 2 Diabetes and it is because there is s history of diabetes in my family on my Mother's side. His is controlled completely by diet and exercise. I am very sorry for your loss.
1 person likes this
• United States
22 Jul 09
Now, this is a real answer. You know the physical, mental, and emotional aspects of Type 1 Diabetes. Most people do not know what you know about Type 1 Diabetes and they do not know how badly it effects people. You know how difficult it can be for a person with Type 1 Diabetes.
• United States
22 Jul 09
Yes, I do know how devastating it can be in all aspects of a person's life. We weren't able to have a child because it made him sterile, but I had a child from a previous marriage that he adopted and has raised as his own. Diabetes is a very cruel and horrible disease and will make one angry because of the limitations that it can and will impose on a person's life, and their physical and emotional well being. They have to have a huge amount of support in that area, and it sounds like you and your family did a great job caring for your brother and it takes a huge toll on the family along with the patient. I do hope that somehow some way they someday come up with a cure for it.
@jadevh (67)
10 Jul 09
I have had type 1 diabetes now for 11 years and I find that most people do not have a great understanding of diabetes. The most often comment i recieve is 'oh does that mean you have too much sugar because u eat too many sweets' which can be rather annoying sometimes and leads me to explain to them what diabetes is all about. It can certainly be hard at times living with it but you come to accept it!
1 person likes this
• United States
14 Jul 09
Someone who understands, thank you. It is not the end of the world having Type 1 Diabetes, but it is not easy living with it. I had to see my brother struggle to live a normal life while having to take shots and check his blood sugar levels four times a day. A lot of people, not saying that you are one of them, but many people have no clue what this is like. Yes, you do come to accept it, but you have to be imagining in the back of your mind, "What it would be like not to have it?" My brother had it for eight years and battled with that question.
@williamjisir (22903)
• China
10 Jul 09
I don't know much about diabetes, but I have heard that it is Type 1 and Type 2. My boss was diagnosed with diabetes back to the year 1999. When hearing of his getting this diabetes, we staff felt very upset for him because we want our boss to enjoy a good health as he has so much to do to run his teaching group as president of the comprehensive school. Ten years have passed. Our boss pays great attention to his diet, which is good for him. I do wish our boss would be free from diabetes some day soon without having to take any medicines...
1 person likes this
• United States
14 Jul 09
Does your boss have Type 1 or Type 2 because they are a slightly different. Type 1 is genetic and most people who have Type 1 get it because a family member had it. If it is Type 2, then that is from having a poor diet? Most people don't know that difference between tha two.