Schools: Are They Important, Or Just Overrated?

Malaysia
August 15, 2009 10:42am CST
Okay, I know what you're thinking. Education is always important. But to what extent? Sure, schooling is important, but if a child is someone who isn't academically advanced, is it alright to tell them they should do better? I think instead of forcing them to be better at something they aren't, we should be honing their capabilities. We should focus on their skills instead of their failures. It's a common reaction for people to look down on those who have low educations. This isn't right. Sure, they might have failed English, or Science, or Geography; but they might be better at other things, like being charismatic, or good with their hands. They could be great mechanics and be able to see how things work very clearly while failing History or Chemistry in school. Schools are merely a stepping stone towards the bigger world out there. Even if we don't do better in school, we might still be accomplished in LIVING. Being good people and better workers. I know some people who never completed high school but are incredibly nice people who work hard for their families and who have strong-willed minds. So. What are you waiting for? DISCUSS! ~K~
13 responses
@mtvmtv (600)
• India
16 Aug 09
Your point is right in a way but not an ideal.In the civilized society education is a must task for every new comer to the world.Think in the childhood no parents would allow or prefer their children to go to work to earn something.What will be the main activity for the children then.Simply their childhood will be spent behind just playing and will not get properly trained for future responsibilities.No doubt schooling is not a guarantee to success but it helps.
1 person likes this
• Malaysia
16 Aug 09
I didn't say children should waste away their youth playing. I merely stated that, if a child cannot/does not do well in school, isn't it better, then, to focus on what they ARE good at? Instead of pointing and saying, 'Oh, look, he's an idiot. He failed his maths all the time. Let's not hire him/ Let's just ignore him,' shouldn't we find what they're REALLY good at and help them find a way to use it to their advantage? It's a common stereotype for people to think that someone is stupid and/or useless whenever they find out that the person never finished high school. Well, guess what? Bill Gates dropped outta school, too. And now he's a billionaire (not that I actually like him). The same goes for Walt Disney. The man was considered a retard when he was young and eventually dropped out, as well. But he was a talented cartoonist and with that, he became the creator of one of the most well-known cartoon/fantasy franchise (is it considered a franchise? I wouldn't know) to this day. Bear in mind that I'm not saying that education isn't important. I'm just saying it's not EVERYTHING. An educated man would take a million dollars in exchange for the life of one man and use it for the better good (because face it; from a logical standpoint, this makes a lotta sense. You could help a million other people with that kind of money). But a good man (who doesn't necessarily has to be well-educated) would never accept such a deal because it's immoral in a way (how do you measure the life of a man?). Of course, it's always good when an educated man is a good man, too. Or vice versa. It all really depends on the individual. Honestly, though, my point IS, there are certain things a Harvard graduate can't do that an average joe can. So we really shouldn't judge people for their college degrees (or lack thereof). ~K~
• China
16 Aug 09
I am agreed
1 person likes this
@indyoke (80)
• Indonesia
16 Aug 09
I think school still important for our children. What we have to repair is how school can develop students's skill and ability based on his own interest and likeness. I mean the school don't push students to follow the lesson that they don't like, it's mean that the school's component must be understand and know which students like mathematic, biology, social knowledge or other lesson? So it should be some monitoring for the students to guide what he/she's talent ?for me, school still important for socializing, character building, leadership, and so on.
@robert19ph (4584)
• Philippines
16 Aug 09
hello Talravean, In my own opinion, schools are very important. Like for instance in applying for work, the company will hire those who studied in a well known school. Finishing your studies is very important too especially now that competition is so tight. You can have a chance to be hired than if you are under graduate.
• Malaysia
16 Aug 09
Aha! That's EXACTLY what I mean. Is it alright for people to dismiss someone who went to a community college and got a degree there when you have someone who has a degree from Harvard?? What's the difference? Just. A. Name. In the end, the work that they'll turn in, depends solely on the person themselves. ~K~
1 person likes this
• Philippines
17 Aug 09
That is true. But in real world, you can't remove human biases and what you call PR. Graduating in a real exclusive school is already an advantage.
• Philippines
15 Aug 09
If you want to be rich then school is bad for you. School is important to the extend that you need to learn how to read and write. You need to learn basic math. But after that school is bad. Why? Here are an example. When you have an exam in school you are not allowed to copy with your classmate. Why is this bad? It's bad for real life situations. Because in real life if somebody else already knows the problem, you either copy what he does or hire him. But in school you are subconsciously trained not to do that. Another example. In a quiz school trains you that there is only one answer and there is only one way to arrive at the answer. All other methods and all other answers are incorrect. In real life that is not true. There are many ways to arrive at an answer and even more than that no answer is wrong. There can be many answers to a problem and many ways to solve them. School is bad really.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
I never thought of it that way, but you make a lot of sense. =D. I especially agree with that last part; there ARE many ways to one goal. There's not just one road in life. ~K~ PS: I love your style, =P.
• Philippines
15 Aug 09
nice. here is a tip that I wish I learned a long time ago. 1. When you reach legal age, find a low risk low reward sources of income. This can be a job or a part time job (there is really no choice. all low risk sources of income are low rewards). This is important so that you can pay your bills and you don't have to worry about them. But don't get stuck there or else you will be working hard all your life. 2. Then at the same time find a job/project/business that pays you even while you are sleeping (such things do exist) or even when you are not always physically present. You are still young. You still have enough time to figure this out. But I do hope you figure it before you reach your mid twenties so that you can really enjoy your success. Once you find one source of income like this, find another one. Until you have enough that you don't have to work in a job. After that you can do whatever you want like travel, engage in meaningful work like helping the less fortunate, or go back to school to study subjects you really like. Good luck.
@spalladino (17927)
• United States
15 Aug 09
I believe that an adult needs to be well rounded in many areas in order to be successful in any kind of job. While it might not matter whether you did well in History or Math, you need this knowledge in order to make informed decisions in many areas of your life. If schools are allowed to give up on students who are struggling, they are cheating the students because having a problem understanding a concept does not mean that understanding will never come. If a student is having a problem in a subject like History, that student is not putting in the study time required in order to retain the information. We do not want to raise a society of ignorant adults. Education is the key and should be supported...along with the different learning styles that students have.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
True, true. I understand where you're coming from. But I'm actually focusing more on the fact that, if someone had only a high school education, should they be ignored when it comes to being accepted for a job in favor of taking someone from, say Harvard or whatever? Is it right to look down on them? I'm not saying schools should give up on students, no way! But when there's no other way to help them, isn't it better for them to focus on what they can do best rather than trying any harder to cram knowledge into their brains? Certain schools don't have the kind of consideration for their students that you're speaking of, sadly. ~K~ PS: Personally, I think we're already living in a society of ignoramuses, but that's beside the point.
@spalladino (17927)
• United States
15 Aug 09
I actually do believe that it's very unfair that some employers give more weight to those with a college degree over those without one...but who may have more real life experience. My field is computer technology and many times knowledge, experience and talent greatly overshadows degrees and certifications so, no, it's not right to look down on someone for that reason. "I'm not saying schools should give up on students, no way! But when there's no other way to help them, isn't it better for them to focus on what they can do best rather than trying any harder to cram knowledge into their brains?" Here in the U.S., once you get into high school, you can usually choose to learn a trade as part of your education if you're not academically inclined. A friend of mine saved her son's future by getting him into a program that focused on his talents and interest in computer engineering when he was failing in school. He also had to learn the basics. P.S. I agree with you about the ignoramuses.
@psycospaz (320)
• United States
15 Aug 09
My personal take on it is: I agree with you: with a big BUT: I love the ideas of these specialized schools that are popping up now. That way if you really do completely suck in one subject but excel at another (math vs english is the main one) they can opt to go to a specialized school that focuses on their accomplishments/strengths and works on improving what they are week in, with out putting pressure on it. That way they can become great in an encouraging environment away from the -life- of public school. Also that way they have the pieces of paper every employer wants (degrees/diplomas) and they are not looked down apon for dropping out. HOWEVER.. Living through the trials and tribulations of hell in public schools also teaches valuable life lessons. In grade school I was very shy and cried stupidly easily, but after about 3rd grade that stopped and I became much stronger because I was tired of being picked on. I know not everyone is like me, but that is how life is. People are mean, vile and willing, ready and fully capable of stepping on, stabbing or crushing those backs who are not willing to stand straight. And public schools help prepare for that. But that is my opinion.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
I love your opinion. =D. Pros and cons always go hand in hand, after all. Anyways, there are such schools?! O.O I really wanna see them... ~K~
@benny128 (3622)
15 Aug 09
I guess depends on what level schooling you mean lol, schooling upto the age of 16 is important here in uk as I think it teaches students the basics and thats about it. Further education ie college and degree's I would say are not that important to be honest. The reason I say this is I have friends who have degree's in bio-medical science and business etc etc and who are working as cashiers etc etc on minimum wage. I have no further education and I am running my own internet company and am semi retired at 35. I think its a case of looking at the skills and deciding on the best for the individual but not to get brain washed that degrees etc etc are a must because I am living proof they are not.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
=D Congratulations to you, then. Thanks for being my online evidence, lol! ~K~
• United States
15 Aug 09
I believe it really depends on what you're going to do in life. A good majority of the jobs out there that require school do not even need it. I can see if someone wanted to be a brain surgeon or flying an airplane, but an office job or even IT or computer programmer job that requires a degree is simply nonsense. Does having an education make you a "smarter" or "better" person? No, not necessarily. All it says it that you were able to fork out the money and sit through a class. The people asking for your credentials really have no idea what that class is or how you accomplished your goals. As a hiring manager I would take work work experience and personality over college any day.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
Awesome! =D You're a great manager, then. You've got my respect. ~K~
@krajibg (11940)
• Guwahati, India
15 Aug 09
Hi k, Yes I do support your points. Schools or higher education should not be made available for all. Only those who excel would go there or the rest would concentrate on what they are good at. This vocational education. There is no need to know the pure knowledge subjects and fail. School is mere formality but we need a drastic and radical vision on this.
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
Thank you! =D Colleges like Harvard and Cambridge are simply inaccessible to some people but because of that, these people are less respected than those who are capable of going. It's really not right, encouraging something like that. And yes, school IS a formality. It's like an orientation class; you should go, but even if you don't, it's not the end of the world. ~K~
@Informer (803)
• India
15 Aug 09
Hi Friend, Whatever I am now, I am just because of school. More me it a place of worship. We study there and learn about life and everything...I think you should meet your old teacher and discuss it with them..
• Malaysia
15 Aug 09
Hehe, sorry if I made it sound offensive to schools. I just meant, if you don't do well, should you be looked down upon because of it? Also, I'm still schooling, actually, and well. One of the reasons I'm asking is BECAUSE of my teachers. Some of them are quite bigoted, not that they aren't good teachers. But they take things too personally, as in they hold grudges against the kids for little things. It's okay to scold them, but should you really verbally abuse them in front of their peers? It's scarring for some. I speaking on behalf of my friend. I don't really care what the teachers wanna call me, because I know what and who I am. But some of my schoolmates aren't as strong willed and frankly, they aren't very good with academics, though they're very amazing at sports (unlike me... XD). ~K~
@EliteUser (3971)
• Australia
23 Sep 09
Hey, I actually think that schools are relatively important in life, because they provide people with a good education, so when they are older, they actually know what to do, and what not to do. Make sure you have a good day, God bless and Happy Lotting!!
@versio9 (329)
• Philippines
16 Aug 09
schools are definitely important. but they must be restructured. a child doesn't have to learn everything in school. and when you're in the arts, the traditional school is the last place to learn the arts. and how about specially gifted potential athletes? the best school is the basketball or tennis court or whatever gym or trackfield needed. in these days of highly specialized activities, schools must gear towards finding the special interests of children and developing these interests at an early age. the subjects of chemistry or constitution and the like should be least priority.