Sacred Geometry and religion, the building blocks of the universe

United States
January 10, 2010 4:39am CST
Anyone familiar with sacred Geometry? Did ancient religions know more than modern man? It seems that most of the universe is made up of it. While the public sees the physics of science out front, behind the scenes things like torsion science is being done that could give us unlimited energy sources. Recently scientist were shocked to discover the hexagram cloud formation on top of Saturn's north pole and think that the Saturn rings might be creating a giant torsion generator for some purpose beyond our understanding. Cabala (or Kabbalah) and other religions have hinted at the importance of geometry in our reality for a long time even on how transcendence is achieved within the human body. Lets not forget the Buddhist depictions of murals of mandalas.
2 responses
@bird123 (10527)
• United States
10 Jan 10
Fractals are part of the science that makes up this universe. For the universe to unfold into what we have today, there has to be something much more complex than simply random chance.
• United States
11 Jan 10
Thank you for the reply. I agree that there seems to be more than meets the eye with geometric patterns, even at the atomic level things are not a bunch of chaotic movements but follow a geometric patterns. If you believe in infinite big and infinite small theory than that means everything is based off of the same patterns.
@nocturn98 (956)
• Venezuela
10 Jan 10
I have read some things about the divine proportion and the fibonacci sequence during the height of The Da Vinci Code craze. I don't know how ancient this was but they have been present since the renaissance. I think people of the ancient times are a lot smarter because of their thirst for knowledge. Nowadays, we just accept what is true because it has been proven a long time ago.
• United States
10 Jan 10
Thank you for the reply. Maybe we became to prideful and just figured all the past things were just superstitions and now we are moving backwards to rediscover that maybe they knew a bit more than we thought they did about how things worked.