Students say No! to increased university tuition fees!

October 12, 2010 4:03pm CST
Students of britain (and anywhere else, join the cause) say No to a potential tripling of university fees, proposed by the government as part of spending cuts. Barely out of a recession and with the highest unemployment rate in decades (and the government cutting thousands more jobs by the week) we simply can't afford such increases. If these cuts go ahead there will be almost no point going to uni at all. Join the cause against this by: - joining the facebook fan page "Students of Britain Say No" - Tweeting #studentssayno - Displaying the Students say no poster, as can be found on the facebook page. regardless of where you come from, please support our cause and give students a fighting chance at succeeding.
7 responses
@jb78000 (15178)
13 Oct 10
no problem. after the tories cut genuinely unnecessary expenses, like trident, then they have a case for cutting the funding for education. at the moment they don't.
1 person likes this
13 Oct 10
you do know that you'd need a degree in science of some sort to design and build a nuclear bomb right?
@jb78000 (15178)
13 Oct 10
no you don't. you just need some uranium, some lego, and an evil plot.
1 person likes this
@reckon21 (3487)
• Philippines
12 Oct 10
This goes the same in my country and I don't understand this university who would implement tuition fees increased with our present economic turmoil nowadays. Everybody is feeling financial hardship already...what more can they want from us. Upsetting news.
13 Oct 10
exactly. its very offputting and a lot of very intelligent friends of mine, all who intended to attend university, can no longer afford to do so and so can't reach their full potential. but hey, that's the tories for you. looking out for the rich and screwing over the less so. it brings out my inner Marxist!
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
12 Oct 10
Government uppin prices... Government in charge of student loans... Government owning your life... People working their fingers to the bone to pay for the privilege to pay more... And the entire world hasn't risen up against government yet? What the hell are we waiting for? Folks blaming one side or the other, while every politician is virtually the same. As a very wise man once said to me, "What happens to government when people stop paying for it?" A question I'm asking every government in the world" WTF do you need the money for? Just like my mother's advice to me would go in one ear and out the other - the world's privately earned money pours into government's pocket just to fall out the other. My bad that I didn't listen, and too bad I can't make a law and demand she give me more advice.
1 person likes this
12 Oct 10
well, i did suggest rounding up all the studetns i can find and assassinating all governtment officials, but i figured peaceful protesting would be less likely to get me thrown in jail. which sucks, cause i was gaining support on the whole "murder them all" front.
13 Oct 10
If I were a student now, definitely I would support for no tuition increase. I've been a student before and it's really difficult to continue studying because of the expensive tuition fees. The government should help many of the students who would like to finish studies but could not even enroll there selves due to unaffordable tuition fees.
@qamarep (4453)
• Pakistan
12 Oct 10
how can you stop the fees being increasing.. you should get jobs to pay for uyniversity
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
12 Oct 10
You don't understand that the students are entitled to an education and if educatin is important then the government should pay for it. This is what our society has come to the feeling of entitlement. I couldn't agree with you more that these students should work for their education.
13 Oct 10
ok then look at it this way. the expected salarie of a student in england is between 3-4000 gbp per year. living costs alone average around 8000 a year and that is before the tuition fees are added, which are now being tripled. its all well and good saying to get jobs, which most people already do anyway, but a) thats easier said than done nowadays, and b) it would not even cover half of living expenses. at the end of the day, i could sit around all day claiming benefits left right and centre and not worry about working or studying, but i want to actually be useful and successful. why should we be punished for not wanting to be useless bums?
@jb78000 (15178)
13 Oct 10
goodness me no way the government should support further education. forget that people with it will end up probably paying more tax back anyway, i personally think we should go back a hundred years or so and ensure the only people with a realistic chance of going to university are those with very wealthy parents. yes, i can do 'american sarcasm' too bob.
1 person likes this
@evanslf (485)
14 Oct 10
I also think that the proposed doubling, if not trippling, of uni tuition fees is not acceptable as it will likely deter the poorer students from going to university. That said, I think there is a case for students to pay some fees - as they currently do - to go to university: after all, getting a degree will often benefit them financially throughout their working life and it seems only fair therefore that they contribute to the cost of their uni education and not expect all taxpayers, many of whom will not have gone to uni, to foot all of the bill. That's why I think the current system, though not perfect, has got the balance broadly right. Ie the concept of co-payment: the cost of uni education been born jointly by the general taxpayer and the student who benefits from that education. What however is proposed would shift the vast majority of the cost to the student, which is unacceptable, particularly for those coming from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Having said all this, I think a big problem which has brought this to a head is that TOO MANY people are going to uni. Uni is not suitable for everyone, there are many alternative trades and careers that can be undertaken without the need to go to uni. Too many students and a proliferation of courses - some of which are of dubious value - have brought this situation to a head, worsened of course by the financial crisis. A-levels in my view have been debased - we should toughen up A level standards to what they were 20 years ago and allow the numbers going to uni to go downwards back to around 25% level. The previous administration's wish to have 50% of people going to uni was always unrealistic. If the number of students falls back to 25% level, this will in a large measure help with the current uni funding crisis.
16 Oct 10
i agree with pretty much everything you said, we should definitely pay something for uni, after all it is our choice to go and having everyone else pay for us is unfair to the taxpayers. on the other hand the people currently pushing for these rises went to uni at some point and their fees were even lower than ours. i also agree that not everyone should go to uni, and that apprenticships would be more valuable to some, but rather than removing the option of going to uni we should be highlighting the value fo tehse other options and making sure people know what other choices are available and that going for them instead of uni would not make them less respectable.
@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
12 Oct 10
The Tuition cost paid by students is about 1/3 of the total cost of a college education. This does not include any financial aid the student might receive. Back in the time I went to college(the dark ages according to my children) there was student loans and financial aid provided by the college. Almost every student that attended college had a part time job during the school year and held one or two jobs in the summer. Now only a few seem to have a job in the summer and few work during the school year. Financial aid has increases faster than the cost of college which has increased much more than the cost of living. To me students have to provide a greater share of the cost of a college education. I say good for Britain in asking the students to pay a greater share of their education.
12 Oct 10
all student loans ahve to be paid back with interest, and the vast majority of students receive no grants/scholarships or extra help. also it is almost impossible to find a job nowadays so it's not exactly easy to fund yourself that way. A small raise in tuition might be understandable considering how the government is trying to dig its self out of the debt it got itself into, but suddenly tripling it is unacceptable. Also please, consider that back when you went to college, british university tuition was entirely paid for by the government in the form of student grants, so that doesn't really work as an example. furthermore, the government are introducing higher taxes for people with higher salaries, so what is the point of going to uni now when we are being charged more and then expected to give up more money if our degree does miraaculously get us a job.