Multi-culturalism

@laglen (19782)
United States
February 11, 2011 11:04am CST
French President Sarkozy has said that multi-culturalism just does not work. He has joined a growing group of European countries saying the same. http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110210/wl_afp/francepoliticsimmigrationsociety_20110210231042 Multi culturalism is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiculturalism This is of course practiced all over the world. I would like to open the debate. What is your view of multi-culturalism?
1 person likes this
8 responses
• Saint Vincent And The Grenadines
11 Feb 11
Multiculturalism is a good word, and it's full of great intentions most of us agree on. The problem is that multiculturalism is really difficult to take into practice, and there are always problems and side effects. No system is perfect, and it's a fact that nowadays globalization is taking people all around the world, so we must all face the fact that every society must do an effort to take all those people in and making the resulting country work fine. Sometimes it's difficult because there are people who take certain ideologies too strictly and it's really complicated to talk about multiculturalism..they just stay in ghettos, and not only because society is against them, also because they want to: some gypsies here, some hindus, muslims....of course i'm not saying ALL of them are like that...but some radicals are, yes.
2 people like this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
I understand and I know it is the feel good thing. But like you said, it just work with so many wide ranging beliefs.
• Mexico
12 Feb 11
Hi light strike: I agree with you. It would be nice and perfect if we could build a world of tolerance and respect for the others. However they will always be on every group those terrible ideologies that teach people to hate the others and that their way of life is the "right" way so they have to destroy the others that are not just like them. Almost all cultures have a group of people that will never be integrated because they really don't want to do it. However I think that governments should respect the differences of the citizens. Multiculturalism is not perfect but respect for the others is necessary. And love too. ALVARO
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@laglen (19782)
• United States
12 Feb 11
respect for the others is necessary. And love too. I agree and that goes both ways. When you go to a new country, shouldnt you show respect for that culture?
@epicure35 (2822)
• United States
11 Feb 11
Multi-culturalism is nothing more than a "politically correct" Marxist tool used to divide and conquer. I believe the female German Chancellor preceded Sarkozy in making the same statement. Using "social justice" and racist, sexist, ethnic, socioeconomic class distinctions in order to pit groups against each other for political gain has long been a tool of those who consider themselves the "power elite" and, while it is highly effective as a manipulative and destructive tool (as is taqiyya), there is neither truth nor value in it and results are only negative, anti-peaceful and enslaving. You see, God, who has given us all liberty, views us a "neither male nor female, Jew nor Greek". He sees our spirits, hearts, and motivations as individual, accountable creations of His, not "groups or minorities". We are all individuals, in fact a minority of one, and our value is "intrinsic" within each soul and the character we choose to have. "Group dynamics" has long been a tool of manipulation. People in groups behave differently than they would individually. It can have a positive effect ONLY if the cause and truth of an issue is righteous. But, otherwise it is useless, except to foster hatred of a "real or perceived enemy". People in groups behave differently than they would if approached singly; they lose their perception of accountability for their actions. Mob behavior reigns. Respect for law and for other individuals is lost. Multi-culturalism obscures the truth and rightness of an issue or situation; it sets up emotional behavior rather than rational behavior, and an atmosphere of "we-vs-they" identity. It also promotes a pride dynamic that is destructive, pitting groups against each other, claiming "betterness" and thus destroying unity in favor of division, competition rather than cooperation.
2 people like this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
Great points epicure. You nailed the mob mentality.
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@epicure35 (2822)
• United States
12 Feb 11
Thanks, Laglen, for a great discussion.
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@hofferp (4739)
• United States
11 Feb 11
I don't like it; I don't think it works for a Nation or its people. I'm over hearing Mexican-American, African-American, etc. I much prefer -- American. And if you have to have more...I'm American and my great great great, etc. and grandparents were from Germany, then Russia. (Or you can fill in the blanks Mexico, or Spain, or the Ivory Coast or...) The more multi-culturalism, the more problems/breakdowns in society (government, education, religion, marriage and the family, etc.). That's the short reply... Germany and now, France, have it figured out. The U.S. is still moving in the wrong direction.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
I agree the US is moving in the wrong direction. See my discussion forced arabic, and not to mention the examples of Sharia law in US. Our being told we must "tolerate" every little "tradition" and law of each culture. Nope not buyin it!
@hofferp (4739)
• United States
11 Feb 11
And I hope we put on the brakes pretty darn fast and turn this baby around...
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@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
maybe "we the people" need to be louder...
@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
11 Feb 11
It boils down to the following question, are we a "melting pot"? Or a salad? The distinction is often lost.
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@Taskr36 (13925)
• United States
11 Feb 11
I think in this country people are far too often criticized for "melting" as if they are sell-outs or something. I know my heritage, but I see no benefit to clinging to a homeland that none of my ancestors have lived in for over 100 years.
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@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
maybe we should toss it? sorry couldnt resist I understand culture and its importance but if it is so important that you think your new country should adopt it, why did you leave it in the first place?
@silvercoin (2101)
• Lithuania
11 Feb 11
Anything that provokes conflicts, divides society is wrong.Somehow I believe that if you're a wolf, you have to be among wolves, if you're a sheep, you have to be among sheep.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
I have no problem with people entering new societies, just dont expect them to be your old society
@topffer (32972)
• France
11 Feb 11
France is a secular republic since 1905. Saying that we do not want people to pray ostentatious way in the street is just saying that France is always a secular republic. The problem of Pdt Sarkozy is that he lost totally the states elections in 2010 : 21/22 states are now in the left. To keep a chance to be reelected he needs, like in 2007, to be supported again by the far right. It is what is explaining his attitude when he is chasing Romanian gypsies or here about "multi-culturalism". France is de facto a multi-cultural society. Since the end of the war in Algeria, France is the second muslim country in Europe. Muslims are the main target of far right, and Pdt Sarkozy is nudging the far right here like he did in 2007. All educated French know that he does not think a word of what he says -- he even made official this multi-culturalism in 2003 when he created a "French Council for Moslim Cult" when he was at the Ministry of the Interior --, but we are sometimes ashamed by the international impact of his words.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
wow I did not know that about him. I still think the issue is a serious one. Sarkozy aside there are other countrys doing the same
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@mac1946 (1602)
• Calgary, Alberta
11 Feb 11
I say follow France and Germany,it is alright to help these people,but make them obay "ALL" our laws,regardless their religious or cultural beliefs. In Canada,we have already lost the respect for The Royal Canadian Mounted Police,and our custom of not wearing hats or caps inside buildings. Not to mention the language and political problems.
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@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
exactly! why do they flee their country then try to change the new country into the old one...
@matersfish (6311)
• United States
11 Feb 11
Ah, I'm fine with multiculturalism in its light form, but its existence under one shared flag is a bit tricky for a particular country's identity. We see here in the US up close and personal that even dividing people by culture is a mess, with a person's race and subsequently their culture defining who they are. (Not "American"; add the hyphen...) Of course, that's just one version of American multiculturalism - different than elsewhere, obviously, and not recognized in law per se, but it's still a big part of how we interact, with certain "cultures" given deference. Abroad, they really integrate it in some places and allow cultures to basically be countries unto themselves. I personally can't see how it works even a little bit. You can't have separate standards and view people as separate people and still expect equality. As a country, you're basically just wiping your hands of a culture, thus enabling it to grow. And if its bad elements start to spread out, fuggedaboutit.
1 person likes this
@laglen (19782)
• United States
11 Feb 11
great points. I believe that a country should have its own culture and the citizens live accordingly. This does not mean you can not know and practice your own countries traditions, it just should not disrupt society.