Did any of you ever have dogs who literally ripped apart your furniture?

@puccagirl (7316)
Israel
August 29, 2011 12:12pm CST
Ok, so I have a girl dog (a Golden Retriever) who is around 9 months old now. She has been very naughty since we got her, but since this is quite normal for puppies until you train them, I didn't really worry about it in the beginning. But now she is 9 months old and she has already ripped several pieces of furniture to pieces! When she came, she immediately started biting my old couch, so I tried to train her (even took a dog trainer to help, he just said to wipe something that stings their tongues on the things she likes to bite) and I thought she was better, so in May I got a new couch and some other new stuff. But after stopping the biting for a short period of time, she has now started again, and I came home today to find my new couch (bought in May) completely destroyed. Is this normal? Are they really supposed to be so destructive when they are so old? And if so, how long does it normally last? I have another dog, who was also a bit problematic when he was younger, but he only ruined inexpensive things like shoes, so it wasn't as bad. He stopped doing this when he was around 6 months or so. So if anyone has any advice to give or any idea about how long I should expect this to last, I would be very grateful if you could share! :)
3 people like this
13 responses
@savypat (20246)
• United States
29 Aug 11
Your dog is bored, you have allowed this to get way out of hand and now must stop it. If you don't it will continue to be a problem. A golden is a working dog, she needs a lot of exercise she also needs to have strick boundries set. She is in a habit now and that must be broken. First buy a spray called bitter apple, this is repelent and then baby gates to keep her away from furniture when she is not supervised. Make sure she has other chew toys and exercise her at least two times a day, long walks are best with some retrieve games if you can find a place to do that. If you can get her into a training class and even into a class for the dogs that visit sick people I'm sure she would love it. Goldens love to be loved. All this depends on how much time you can put into your dog. Good luck
@puccagirl (7316)
• Israel
29 Aug 11
Yes, I see what you mean, I suspect that she does that because she is bored too. The thing is, she does have a lot of chew toys, and she plays with them too, and she does get to go out a lot, but she and my other dog are home alone for 8 hours in a row while we work, and this is when this usually happens. So I guess I must find a way to tire her out even more...
1 person likes this
@thanks1961 (7046)
• India
29 Aug 11
Hi dear, For your info, dogs doesn't know that it should not be ripped. Whatever training we give, as long as it doesn't know the value like we think, they try it. So, logically what we can do is that, you can try some other things. Apply certain other things which dogs don't like. Eg, you can try spry some fragrance, or apply talcum powder, where dogs normally don't react. Or try some thing else where dogs dislikes. If you can apply the body spry, they will not make attempts. If you repeatedly do it, and as the smell irritate them, they don't try. It is my simply way of thinking because dogs are so sensitive in adopting the smells. If the wood has an appeal of any kind of taste or attraction, they will keep doing it. So, try to resist or hesitate the dogs to try it and in the rest of the time, if they realise the fact, they won't do it. Just try, Thank-s
1 person likes this
@puccagirl (7316)
• Israel
29 Aug 11
Yes, I have tried this actually, and it does seem to work. But sometimes I forget to put it, and I guess that's why she started again.
• Philippines
30 Aug 11
woah.. I HAVE.. my toys poodle... literally ripped off bed sheets and sofa!! and they are all 6..
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Aug 11
Your dog does this mostly when you are not home? She is good when you are home? If this is the case, then you might want to try crate-training her. You put her in a cage or crate while you are out. You start by doing it a little bit at a time during the day when you are there, though, so that she gets used to it and it does not stress her out too much. Make sure that she has her toys and any blankets or pillows that she normally uses in the crate while she is in there. Also, make sure the crate is large enough for her to move around in comfortably. Some people do not think that crate training is humane, but I disagree. There are some dogs that get anxious and can actually have "separation anxiety" when you are not home. The crate gives them a safe place of their own that they can go and relax. When she is used to the crate, then you may not even have to have it locked when you leave ... she will know the routine and go into it as her "safe" place. We had to do this with one of our dogs, and he was much better afterward and would go into it whenever he wanted to relax. Of course, as soon as you get home it is very important to get them outside for a run and some play time as soon as you can, because they need to use up all the energy that they have stored during the day.
1 person likes this
@marie2052 (3697)
• United States
29 Aug 11
A young lady lived in an apt complex we lived in. She had gotten a weimaraner beautiful dog, but when she went to work every day, the dog would litterally rip through her bathroom, kitchen cabinets etc. She took classes with her dog too. I mean this dog even got her eye mascara and chew on that LOL But finally she went back to Petsmart where she had done training, and then to her Vet, and they said that particular breed does not like to be alone. She wound up having to buy a large kennel when she had to work and placing her dog in it so she would not have a shredded up house when she come home. We had a small sheltie that liked to chew the top off of our hot tub. we too got the apple bitters that you were referring to. Like others we were gone certain times during the day. We gave her to a lovely couple that were home 24/7 and she never chewed on anything because she always had someone home with her. But if you are not willing to give your pet up then try one of those metal kennels while you are gone. Might be a little pricy for that size dog, but can't be as much as new furniture!
• India
16 Oct 11
when my dog was a puppy he used to rip off the furniture.But thankfully he quit that habit as he grew up.He is our first pet so i didnt know that dog would bite furniture.I 'll be very careful, if i adopt another puppy, that furnitures in my house are safe.
1 Sep 11
She is telling you something she may not be getting enough activity during the day also provide her with large bones to chew on during her down time. Golden Retriever is a working dog.
@jaiho2009 (39001)
• Philippines
1 Sep 11
I have a dog who is also having this behaviour of ripping off furnitures and other things. My youngest son cried twice when our dog ripped off his new slippers who cost a lot. Then my daughter's sandals was also bitten into pieces. I had to punish our dog for this behavior and I do feel pity when he cries, but it does works. Now he never bites anything. Have a good day jaiho®
@minx267 (14580)
• Hartford, Connecticut
31 Aug 11
Yes, I had a dog that did a very good job destroying the house and furniture every time we went to work. He went through two Stuffed chairs a mattress the 3 lower drawers on a bureau (he had a thing for wood) a bunch of wicker baskets, at least 6 pairs of sneakers, and A Hassock (and i had that for only one day- came home to the straw stuffing strewn all over the living room). I figured out he must have went through about $2000 worth of stuff.. well, if I had to replace it all new.. I didn't. except the new sneakers he kept eating only the left shoe on all the pairs (mine and my roommates) after buying the 3rd replacement for each of us at $30 a pop... we finally gave up. He was a Lab/Malamute mix.. I have heard from other Labrador owners that it takes a couple of years for them to outgrow this and mature.. and I guess Malamutes also mature slowly... So I thought I was in for a well of a 2nd year as he had done all this destruction in his first year. But We moved to a bigger house and I got HIM a puppy.. and it turns out he was just bored and lonely and he never chewed another thing after we got him his own dog... lol UNLESS, he was mad at me for staying away from home for too long.. adn then I didn't blame him as I felt guilty anyway... Since you already have another dog.. I am not sure what would help in your case except as Purplealabaster suggested... Crate training. But hopefully She will outgrow it soon.. 9 months is still young I would give her a few more months.. it does take them a bit to mature and calm down.. you may want to give her things to do while you are gone... Like buy one of those KONGs that you can fill with peanut butter inside.. and then they spend a good portion of the day trying to lick the peanut butter out of the inside. Make sure to walk her good in the morning too to try and tire her out. She will out grow it I'm sure.. you just have to hang in there. and don't buy any new furniture until you are sure she has. lol GOOD LUCK
@pbbbsra (1214)
• Philippines
30 Aug 11
When we had our first dog, she would also bite around a lot and do her toilet inside the house. My dad was good at it. He is the one who trained her and made her listen. My dad would monitor her time to eat and then tell her out to make her toilet. I remember when she was still a puppy my dad shouted at her and showed her where she did her toilet in the house and hit a slipper beside that, I think it made her remember that and understood it was wrong. From then on, she would tell us signal that she needs to go out for toilet. When we got our second dog which is a husky, he was so small then. He is also naughty on doing his toilet and this time it was me and my husband who teached him. We lock him inside the toilet until he makes his toilet and then let him out. After a few days, he learned making his toilet in there even without being locked. He also started biting the furnitures when his teeth started to itch. We shoo him off when he does and we kept our eye on him all the time. We tell him stop and when he does, we give him treats. We bought him a bone to play with and that helped his attention out of the furnitures. He is very obedient and after some weeks we are able to trust him alone at the house. When we arrive, he is only sleeping and all the furnitures are safe. He also have that habit of waiting for us to come home before he makes his toilet. I think that you can district your dog with a toy and use a common command to stop it when it starts biting.
• Australia
30 Aug 11
I had one, King, who was that destructive. He was a poodle x corgi. So whenever people put out their old couches for cleanup day, I'd collect all the old couch cushions I could carry, then I'd give him 1 couch cushion a week to let him destroy to his heart's content. I knew he was just bored and needed something to do. Also, I'd buy giant bones for him, then freeze them. And when I'd leave for work in the morning, I'd give him a frozen bone, that'd keep him going for half a day, before he'd start tearing apart his couch cushion.
@flagella08 (5069)
• Philippines
30 Aug 11
i had bruno which is 5 months old and so far he got 5 slippers ripped off.my mother got really angry that when she's alone with that dog she doesn't feed him. i told her not to be angry with the dog instead keep all things away from him. we got him chained as of now since we can't get the hold of him all day long. he also pees inside the house and in the couch. he also drag stuffs and bring them outside the house. no wonder mom was really terrified angry.
@YoungInLove (1254)
• Canada
30 Aug 11
Big puppies ruin big things! I have chihuahas, which are actually great puppies to have. If they have accidents in the house, theyre very tiny to clean up, no HUGE messes. But when dogs teeth they are a pain. As much as I dont want my stuff ruined, little dogs ruin smaller stuff. The worse thing that my puppies have ruined were headphones and phone chargers.