What do you think we should be doing about climate change?

@sharra1 (6344)
Australia
September 17, 2011 1:32am CST
In Australia we are trying to bring in a carbon tax to reduce pollution and change from a carbon based power system to a low carbon and renewable energy power system. For me this is the only sensible way to go into the future and reduce the damage that climate change is causing. Unfortunately the political opposition is using this issue to try and bring the government down and force a new election. In the process of doing this they are running a fear campaign that it will destroy our very healthy economy. In the process they have attracted all of the people who believe that climate change is a myth and the fear mongerers who are trying to block it have turned the entire debate into one of attacking the whole science of climate change and any scientist who supports it. Some of the scientists have even had death threats. Perhaps the problem is that none of these people face the prospect of needing new homes like the pacific island nations who are in danger of going under water. At the recent pacific island forum these island leaders were asking if anyone had a spare island or two where they could relocate their nations before they all drowned. The greed of the mining companies who object to any change that might cost them a tiny portion of their billions will cost millions of people their homes and countries but it seems that greed talks louder. The big argument is that we should not be doing anything because no one else is doing anything and why should we be first. This is not the case of course since Europe is doing something about it but the point is that someone has to be first. If no one does anything then a lot of people are going to suffer especially in the future. What do you think?
1 person likes this
4 responses
@asyria51 (2870)
• United States
17 Sep 11
I think that until the corporations and government can get their acts together, and that is not going to happen in this economy, you have to use your buying power. Buy items that you know are better for the environment. My husband and I traded in his SUV crossover for a hybrid. When I just have to pick up milk and bread, i tend to put my daughter in her stroller and walk up to the store. Even small things make a big difference. I make sure to recycle and have helped my school to expand their recycling program. We have big drives for people to bring in cans and bottles. This drive helps the environment and puts a few dollars in the school's pocket. There is a wind plant going in near my house. We do not have any sizeable rivers really near to where I live, but would like to see the power of the mississippi utilitized more.
2 people like this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
18 Sep 11
We try and buy items like that but it is not always easy to read the fine print. We live in a rural town and we buy as much as we can locally but once a fortnight we have to drive to a bigger town to do a major shop. We do try and use our car as little possible. The carbon laws that our current government is trying to bring in is an attempt to force corporations, mining companies and power generators to make the change. Some of our power companies are already investing in renewable energy. Recently we were offered a deal by a power company to install solar power on a payment plan over 2 years with no interest. More of these deals are needed as people often do not have the funds to pay the high costs up front. The other incentive offered by our state government is that they pay us for any net power that we generate. It is a good deal. During the day we generate all our own power and export some for which we are paid. So we are reducing our power costs and helping the environment.
• Australia
18 Sep 11
One of the major expenses and drains on power that local councils have, is the provision of potable water. In the city it would certainly be more difficult to do, but in rural areas such as ours rain water tanks are viable and not tremendously expensive. When our plumber finishes the job next week, we will have over 22,000 litre capacity, and with our wet season due, and promised to be a bit over-generous again (last year there were widespread floods in our state), we will be virutally independent of the council's water supply. The more of us who do this, the less drain there is on resources. Lash
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@asyria51 (2870)
• United States
19 Sep 11
My parents always kept rain barrels, 50 gallon plastic tubs, and mom would use the rain water for the watering of plants, especially her vegetables. I remember using the rain to fill up our little kiddie pool in the summer so that we would not have to use the hose.
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@JenInTN (27565)
• United States
17 Sep 11
I think that by releasing some of that hidden technology they have had forever where energy reduction is concerned would be a great start. It is greed. It is putting us all in that iron cage where we need to depend on what they allow us. There are very few people that consider the well being of anyone else unless it benefits them in one way or another. They never think they are going to see certain things in their lifetime but the thing is that it will be in someone's lifetime.
2 people like this
• Australia
17 Sep 11
I was talking about this self-interest and blindness to others' needs in another thread with P1ke. I don't know what it takes to wake them up. Lash
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@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
18 Sep 11
I do not know about hidden technology but I know that their is enough technology to change the way we power our country. Solar power on every home feeding back into the power grid where it is stored and bought back at night when the sun has gone. Also the great wind turbines are able to produce a lot of power. It is possible to replace coal and reduce polution but the people who have the power and the money are not interested in changing their ways.
• India
17 Sep 11
Hi sharra1 We should all take severe steps to stop global warming as this is the thing which is creating climatic issues . If you all know Himalayan their snow is melting at a rapid pace And if it will melt like this then the sea water level will increase and all countries would get buried in water. Everyone should take the responsibility The main reason for global warming is the pollution . I don't say to stop using vehicles just use public vehicles more often instead of using of your own. take severe steps to stop global warming o\w we would not be left up with anything In the coming world.
2 people like this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
18 Sep 11
I quite agree that everyone should take responsiblity. We have recently installed solar panels on our home that let us generate our own power and any power we do not use feeds back to the electricity supplier. They pay us for the power we give them and at night we buy back what we need. It is a great system and with the right financial support everyone could do it. This was made possible for us by the power company installing the whole deal and letting us pay for it over 2 years without paying interest. A great scheme that should be done across the country. It is possible to make the changes but it takes the will to make the investment and the change. As to vehicles I think that we need to change from oil to electric. I know they are improving electric cars these days but it is hard for people to be able to afford the change and they need to improve them.
• Australia
17 Sep 11
The IPCC is the major study body on climate change, and its reports are unequivocal and written by many of the world's leading scientists in the appropriate fields, including Nobel Prize winners in several disciplines. There is some scientific opposition, but my reading on climate scepticism, which was a quite extensive project in my recent doctoral research on Environmental Anthropology, suggests that few have anywhere near the professional standing of those who support the IPCC stand. Many can be shown to be funded by organisations which have a vested interest in the status quo. In the same manner I mentioned in another discussion in this interest, the conservative Right has chosen to accept the work of a minority group of minor scientists over the majority of scientific opinion, and since Global Capitalism is the brain-child of the conservative right and is likely to suffer from any euch environmental legislation, it does not take much cynicism to suggest that in this case their own vested interest is best served by fighting things like mining taxes and carbon emission schemes. Those kicking and screaming against the environmental lobby are almost exclusively those with something to lose. Lash
1 person likes this
@sharra1 (6344)
• Australia
17 Sep 11
Yes I see a lot of opposition coming from these interest groups and I would not object to them voicing their objection in a sane and rational manner. What bothers me the most is the massive fear campaign that has been launched and the viciousness involved in it. Perhaps they are frightened that their are no rational arguments to support them so fear is their only weapon. It is a very effective tool. The hatred and fear that have come out in the campaign has even begun to disturb some members of the political opposition who actually believe in climate change and that something has to be done about it.