Dilemma in Mapua

@jonnifc (1021)
Philippines
March 30, 2012 3:09pm CST
I read this thread when a friend posted it in FB. It was a bit disturbing and sad. Basically it's about a guy who is studying in Mapua Institute of Technology. It's taking him many years to finish his college degree because of financial issues. So long that I think it took him more than 8 years. Finally all he needs is one more subject and OJT, then he's finished. Problem is, there is a new resolution in the maximum residency requirement. It turns out that all his credits throughout his stay are dissolved/discredited and he has to start from scratch. Only some subjects in languages, humanities and social sciences are credited. Everything else are discredited. I'm gonna post the link so you guys can read the whole story. (Not a referral link) http://tsikot.com/forums/goon-squad-hq-19/mapua-finished-glorious-school-no-more-but-mere-shadow-its-reputation-87014/ Now I'm thinking, what should be done? If he has to retake almost everything, he will never graduate. But the school may be right also because there might be many things that he hasn't learned yet because of what he learned 10 years ago, may not be enough to equip him in the workplace these days. It's just heartbreaking. What do you think about this?
1 person likes this
12 responses
@ybong007 (6659)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
This is one thing that should be debated before being implemented because lives are at stake here. Personally, I really find it questionable when a student would take 8 years to finish college. Financial reasons could be a factor but there are a lot of students who graduated in four years faced with the same problem. More often, student staying in college longer than necessary are the ones who don't want to graduate themselves. I think Mapua has taken up everything into consideration before implementing this new policy but whether or not they are independent from CHED doesn't mean they're not covered by Philippine law.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
They've lost it, that's what happens when a greedy business tries to combine business with education. this school will die out very soon if they continue with this path
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Thanks for your response, ybong007! It's true that there are those who can graduate "in time" even if they are financially challenged. But we can't really tell why it took him that long. Maybe if he didn't persevere enough, he would have been one of those who would drop out of college entirely. Maybe there were other things he had to be responsible for. Maybe he was a bit of a slacker. Who knows? So maybe the school should find out why it took him that long to finish. But I think that if this was a new rule, there should be measures in place for special cases while they are transitioning into the new rule. They may be independent from CHED, but they are still human who can decide if they can extend kindness while still being true to their mission of having fully-equipped graduates.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Hey LetranKnight25! A lot of people think Mapua has become a "business" venture and no longer an institution who valued their students. I remember Mapua had such a prestigious reputation. Their reputation has been going downhill the past few years. Sad though.
@larish (2196)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
As far as I know, It has been a practice of any university that students follow the curriculum of the school. If a student overstay regardless of his reason, he should follow the current curriculum/subjects for him to graduate. Rules are rules.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
In every school, there is a a Maximum Residency Requirement. You know, it was one of the things I made sure I found out about before I went to enroll in college. But, if I understood the article right, the amendment to the MRR rule was fairly new. If that is the case, then I think it's only fair that the school should have a way to accommodate those few students who will be affected by the amendment. If the amendment, however, was kinda old, then it would be the student's fault to not know about it himself beforehand. I mean, even while you're in school, students get to talk about the MRR at one point or another. It's hard not to know about it. Hey thanks for your response!
@larish (2196)
• Philippines
2 Apr 12
Really? "MRR rule was fairly new"? I don't think so. I am a college graduate in 1992 and I am aware of the MRR and I totally understand why it is implemented by the school. It is unfair to be on the same course for more than eight years or MRR. The school won't also be confident enough to recommend someone for graduation who have taken a course more than the MRR. Rules are Rules.. it should be followed.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
2 Apr 12
I didn't mean that the MRR rule was new. The AMENDMENT on Mapua's MRR rule was new.
@johndur (3050)
• Pasig, Philippines
1 Apr 12
that was nasty...he tried his best just to finish his studies the all of a sudden everything will go down the drain...i hope the school would give him some consideration on that matter...or he will need another decade to finish his studies...
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Well if it takes him another decade, then what he studied at the start of that decade will be obsolete again. If I was him, I'd just quit school altogether, if that's the case. You're right that he should be given consideration, especially since it's because of a new rule that they implemented. His, and possible only a few others, is only a special case. I understand that it's also not responsible for them to just simply make him graduate because he might not be fully equipped to face the industry that he wants to work in. But the school should find a way to help him out. It's really a hard situation to resolve. Thanks for your response!
1 person likes this
@johndur (3050)
• Pasig, Philippines
4 Apr 12
thats true or maybe the school can give them some additional units so he can cope up with the innovations...
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
7 Apr 12
Right! That could be a way to go!
1 person likes this
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
This is a very sad news. Going to school is really very expensive nowadays, and we can't blame the student why his studies reached that long. The school should consider him and to other students as well. I can't imagine how sad the student is and also to his parents who worked hard just to let his son graduate. It just shows that the rich get richer and the poor will be poorer.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
What's sad is that there are rich people who take advantage of the poor just so they could get richer. What ever happened to helping those who are less fortunate? I do hope that the school finds a way to help the student graduate. From the article it seemed that the school was unwilling to explore options to help the student. Baaaddd!
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Oh! Pardon my manners! I forgot to thank you for responding. So, thank you for your response!
• Philippines
2 Apr 12
If the school don't want to explore other options, then that's really bad. There should be exemption especially his case wherein the prolonged stay is due to his inability to pay and not because of subject failures.
@nezavisima (7419)
• Bulgaria
30 Mar 12
t really is a terrible dilemma and I do not know what this guy firstly it. definitely need some help him. Yet hopefully everything around him ranked as wrong. I was sorry when I read this news.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
30 Mar 12
I was also sad to read his story. Maybe they can just give him like a readiness test in all the other subjects so he won't have to take them again. It's just disheartening that all those years he studied there was all for nothing. Thanks for your response!
1 person likes this
• Bulgaria
31 Mar 12
this is very sad to. sorry for this guy. I was always sorry when you read a story. because each of us can happen to him and no one is immune. I thank you for your attention. Have a nice day!
@CTHanum (8254)
• Malaysia
1 Apr 12
It's all because of the new resolution right?The college should consider students like them. They should make it strict for those who new students not to ongoing students like them. It kind of unfair. Yeah, it is a rule but it's not fair to them. The college will not lose anything. In fact they will gain profit but not the students. They should make consideration about that.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
My sentiments exactly! There should be a transition period where those affected by the new rule will have a way to go around it. And the new rule should strictly and absolutely be imposed to those who are studying there for less than 4 years. It shouldn't all be black and white. Follow the rules or not. It's never that easy. If they really value their students, then they should think about what would benefit ALL their students. Anyway, we're talking about maybe just a handful of them. So why not help these "special cases". Especially if they're not really slackers. They are just financially challenged. Thanks for responding!
@anne25penn (3310)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
I know that this student has done an amazing feat to try to finish his college studies even if he has to be a working student. But I don't blame the school if they updated their curriculum and the student has to take almost everything again. When I was in college, I had to stop for a year because I was already working that time. When I came back after a year, I was informed by the registrar that most of the subjects that was listed during my first year have been changed. Since then, I always viewed our education system as just a piece of paper that companies put a lot of importance to, and is sometimes a source of discrimination. In 2002 I was looking for a job and got turned down because I was overage or I was an undergrad. It didn't matter to these companies if I worked as a manager in a fast food chain for five years and know more about handling people and labor laws than the fresh graduates they were hiring. What mattered to them was that the job applicant had a piece of paper informing them that they finished college. I hope that the student in your link or story will be able to find a better solution to this dilemma rather than taking all of the courses again.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
You know that's the problem with companies in the Philippines. They have all these requirements that aren't really important in hiring a prospective employee. Like age, for example. Because of that, they contribute to the rising unemployment rate in the country. I understand why they would want a college graduate, but if an applicant has significant work experience, then that should be the applicant's merit to qualify for the job. Maybe they prefer newly grad because they can pay them lower than those with experience. But that's just twisted and wrong! Hey thanks for your response and good luck to you!
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
Hello Jonnifc, the worst part that I've heard way back was Mapua's name changing to Malayan College, which was horrible. I've always thought Mapua has produce a lot of people who have industrious careers. my classmates from Letran High studied there in college and i can tell you they have been out most success. But i bet they will be deeply disappointed with the current administration just did. it's hard to believe that Mapua's sole reputation and integrity has drastically been tampered. there's always other Colleges though, like Letran for example there's nothing we can do, but i think there should be a media exposure to this problem.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Hello again! You're from Letran? Really? I wouldn't have guessed, even from your name. I'm not from Mapua either. I didn't know about the Malayan College issue. But if that was so, why should they change the name? It's the Philippines' own "MIT"! And with almost the same reputation as the American "MIT". The name has it's own value. Why discredit it just because it's under new management? Ugh! Seriously, I do agree that there should be media exposure to this problem. Since there are a lot of other schools that are autonomous (from CHED), who's to say that other schools won't do the same?
@mrfdg1972 (3238)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
there will be exemptions to that. this case should be resolve to the highest level. I'd burn the ______ .
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
Burn the what? I think that the phrase "exemption to the rule" wouldn't have been coined if it didn't happen in reality. So maybe it's only fair if there were a few exemptions to this rule. They will only have exemptions while they are transitioning into the implementation of the new rule anyway. My, my! That was confusing! Thanks for your response!
@maxen07 (893)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
I think he should be exempted from the new resolution considering the fact of what he has gone through. Those heartless people in the administration should be shown what it's like for the youth of the Philippines to handle everything when things get worse. We can only expect so much from our poor system. To be spat in the eye just like that is an insult to all of us. It was as if that school didn't earn anything from the poor guy who spent his 8 years little by little to earn a college diploma. If the issue won't be resolved, then the other schools will do the same. What would happen to us now?
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
That's what I think so too! Students who will be affected by the new resolution, such as the guy in the story, should be exempted. The rule should be implemented to those who are studying there for less than 4 years. Especially if the student who, despite his financial difficulties, is still willing to finish his course and graduate with a diploma. The school should find a way to help these students who persevere against all odds just to get that ever so important diploma. Hey thanks for your response!
@Graceekwenx (3163)
• Philippines
31 Mar 12
i have read some the of the comments in that blog. It has something with Mapua being an autonomous school and that they are immune from CHED curriculum. It is such a sorry fate that one has to stay till 8 years of school only to find out that he would need to start from scratch. the other major concern of the school though is that the important subjects that he had taken has come obsolete. Let's face it. With the fast advancements of technology, these subjects can really come as obsolete as they had been overruled by more practical and efficient theories. If i was the administrator, the least that i can do is allow the student to re-enroll the subjects needed but with little or no more charges on his matriculation. This, i will for humanitarian purposes and for his loyalty to my school. As the subjects that he had taken has become obsolete, i regret that i could not allow him to graduate bearing the name of my school because his knowledge is no longer at par with the technology of today.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
You've got a great idea there! Discounted or free tuition for those subjects that he has to retake. I don't think offering that payment scheme will not be a big loss to the school since only a handful of students can make use of it. And then after the transition period into the new resolution, they won't have to offer the discount anymore. I do agree that the school has a valid reason not to let the student graduate bearing the name of the school. Thanks for your response!
@mensab (4208)
• Philippines
30 Mar 12
i like this discussion. the dilemma of that overstaying students is real. i understand the logic of credit of courses and the limit of the number of years that credits are accepted. but the implementation must not be abrupt. the students who are overstaying should be given consideration to finish their courses. afterwards, the college can start from the first year students coming for the school year.
@jonnifc (1021)
• Philippines
1 Apr 12
I agree. If this was a new resolution, they should have an ample period of time to inform all the students, whether they will or will not be affected by it. Then for those who will be affected, obviously those who are nearing the MRR, then there should be some way to go around it so that they will not have to retake everything over again. That's just a waste of time and money for the student. I mean, years of college studies will go down the drain! Maybe there should be some sort of readiness test that they can take for each subject. If they pass, then they don't have to retake the subjects. At least the student can review/learn on his own to prepare himself for the test. But these tests will only be offered to those affected at the time of transition into the new resolution. Like maybe those who have had 5 or more years over the 4-year normal term. Hey thanks for your response!