Would getting a different car be smart?

St. Peters, Missouri
December 2, 2012 5:02pm CST
I have just finished paying off my car. It's a 2007 Sonata Hyundai and has V-6 engine. I am currently averaging around 21 miles to the gallon. I drive a lot for my work. I usually drive 50-60 miles a day, sometimes closer to 100 miles. Assuming I continue driving this many miles, would it pay to get a car with better gas mileage? If so, what car would you suggest?
5 responses
@lampar (7597)
• United States
3 Dec 12
I don't think so. V-6 is quite a powerful engine, you can get a lot more power, it is an average gas mileage you are getting for a V-6. You should drive for few more years after all you don't have to continue paying for using this one. Getting a different car may put you back into making payment again for more years to come, it is not worth it, your saving on gasoline may not be much with today new gas guzzler, unless you are in for a hybrid or electric car. Average new four cylinder gasoline car is around 30-32 miles per gallon, not much of a saving in a day when the gas price is around 2-3 bucks. But if you can get rid of the 2007 Sonata with good price, then it is a whole different story or you intent to drive more than 100 miles every day, a higher quality brand from reputable car maker will lower your annual maintenance cost.
1 person likes this
• St. Peters, Missouri
3 Dec 12
Sadly, yes. The best gas mileage we can seem to get in a non-hybrid or non-electric car is usually low 30s. I was looking at the Cruze and Sonic - both from Chevrolet. But they only average 33 miles to the gallon. I like the Leaf, it's a cute car. But even if I could swing the downpayment for it, I haven't looked into what it costs to charge those things. Do you have any idea what it runs over here in the States?
@lampar (7597)
• United States
4 Dec 12
Hypothetically speaking, if the gasoline price you are paying is around $3, and your home electric rate is about $0.10/KWH, then you are looking at about paying somewhere between 1/3 to 40% of the total gasoline cost for the same distance you are driving each month on full electric only. If your hybrid mix electric motor and gasoline engine constantly on its drive train, then the figure can be higher let say around 1/2 -3/4 but lower than full gasoline engine. So if the gas pump price go up, then you will save more if your electric rate remain the same. The best way to save on gasoline and great mileage per gallon is to get an electric car. No other better way than it.
1 person likes this
@Guit08 (597)
• United States
4 Dec 12
The thing is though, that each year hybrid and electric technologies keep advancing, so it might do you well to just keep waiting. Plus, do you really want to buy a new/new-used car and have to worry about car payments all over again? Also, re-charging an electric vehicle may be difficult (or next to impossible) depending on how it needs to be charged and the availability of charging stations in your area. You don't want to get to your destination only to find out that you don't have enough battery power to get back home!
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18312)
3 Dec 12
Get a turbo inter-cooled diesel, not only far better mpg but more tractable on the road, more reliable, longer lasting, expect a minimum of 200,000 from a modern diesel, not liable to stop if you go through water all the best, urban
1 person likes this
• St. Peters, Missouri
3 Dec 12
A Volkswagen is looking kind of good. I have found models that are turbo diesel, but none that state they are inter-cooled. Is it possible that we don't have them? Would a turbo diesel be as good? Or is the inter-cooled part assumed?
@urbandekay (18312)
3 Dec 12
No, the turbo uses the energy in the exhaust gas to spin a compressor that compresses the air entering the engine, thus getting more air in and thereby allowing greater fuel as well. More air and fuel, bigger bang, more power. But, compressing the gas causes it to expand (Boyle's law) so then running it through an inter-cooler (A radiator) cools the air contracting it. Best diesel engines are Peugeot's in cars. Now things get a little more complicated since Land-Rover invented high pressure diesel injection, which VW adopted, using a different system called common rail. Most modern diesels are common rail, which also increases power but at perhaps some cost regarding reliability. Now, Peugeot diesels are still good but common rail diesels heat the return fuel to a high temperature and it needs to be cooled because some diesel tanks are plastic! Peugeot, for some reason better known to themselves, choose to put a diesel line cooler under the vehicle very low and this can cause problems, worth checking if you go for a Peugeot. Ford Mondeo uses a Peugeot diesel engine and presumably benefits from a Ford gearbox Merky des also makes good diesels all the best, urban
1 person likes this
@voracious (624)
• Philippines
3 Dec 12
Practically speaking of you have the money then change your car because the latest cars have the best performance like fuel efficiency, better mileage, eco friendly and so on. I suggest change car every 5 to 10 years.
1 person likes this
@dorannmwin (36698)
• United States
3 Dec 12
I actually don't think that there is one right or wrong answer to this question. I mean there are a lot of things that need to be taken into consideration. First of all, how much do you still owe on the car that you have right now and would you be able to sell it for that amount or more? Next, are you willing to spend money for a new car when it will take a time to actually see the savings. If you do decide to get a different care after thinking about these things, then I would say that your best option would be to look for a used hybrid vehicle which will triple or better your current fuel mileage.
• Bucharest, Romania
2 Dec 12
Thank you !