Ready To Plant

@Fishmomma (11524)
United States
March 13, 2013 7:01am CST
Today I spent part of my afternoon weeding my garden area. My next move will be deciding what to plant, as the local gardening stores have lots of choices including tomatoes. Last year I planted two tomatoes and still have tomatoes in my freezer, so I may end up not planting them or if I do will plant a different color to have variety in our meals. Last month I noticed there is a new plant place and they have many of the organic varieties of various fruit and vegetables. I'm going to stop in that place this weekend. The Blueberry Plants that we planted last year have many flowers on them now. I'm really looking forward to lots of berries this year. Our Green Grapes and Raspberries still are dormant; however, we have been watering them as we wait. Does anyone know when we should see leaves? Several of you helped me with my pruning problem, as this has been a learning experience for my husband and I. Thanks for your help and any suggestions for vegetables to grow this season are welcome.
2 people like this
8 responses
@peavey (16118)
• United States
13 Mar 13
I don't know what zone you're in, but I'm in zone 5b and my grapes aren't waking up yet. It will be at least another month here before they start to put out leaves. They're later than apples and plums, if that helps. I don't know about raspberries. I'm just now contemplating planting some lettuce and maybe a few radishes. The ground is still wet and cold out there right now.
1 person likes this
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
13 Mar 13
I use to live in Oregon and everything would go dormant, but moved to Southern California where I harvested tomatoes in December last year. My neighbors think I could easily grow crops year round and I would like to try some of the vegetables people have mentioned. I'll just have to be patient and wait to see leaves on the raspberries and grapes. Its hard to see the leaves disappear on only a few plants in my yard, as I'm not use to it yet. My ground is rarely wet or cold and at times miss the seasons. Thanks for the suggestion of lettuce maybe it could be planted here in the shade. I haven't grown lettuce here.
1 person likes this
@peavey (16118)
• United States
14 Mar 13
I would really miss the four seasons, but every place has its advantages. You should be able to grow a lot there, and probably year round, too.
1 person likes this
@doroffee (4230)
• Hungary
13 Mar 13
Oh, as if I had a garden... we only have a really little community garden in front of our big city living apartment building. I'd like to have my own garden, where I could plant fruit bushes and trees and beautiful flowers. Seems like you are going to have a pretty little garden with blueberries, raspberries and grapes (yum, yum and extra yum!)
1 person likes this
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
14 Mar 13
I told my husband when we buy a house that we would be growing homegrown produce and told him I'm planning to plant blueberries, so we went out and purchased 2 plants. They now have flowers on them. No berries last year on them, so really looking forward to seeing them with berries. The raspberries did have a lot of berries last year. My daughter loves raspberries. Thanks for posting.
@elenaliu (150)
• China
13 Mar 13
I think it's very interesting to plant something in your garden,it couldn't be better to plant some fruits and vegetables,the fruits and vegetables planted by yourself will be very healthy.I have never planted green grapes and raspberries,so I have no good ideas for you,I hope you can find out how to plant them soon.
1 person likes this
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
14 Mar 13
I enjoy planting, as its really relaxing. My family knows they are getting home grown produce and my daughter enjoys eating berries while watching television, which is certainly better for her. Thanks for posting.
1 person likes this
• Indonesia
13 Mar 13
I don't know much about plant or gardening. We have garden at my home town but I never take time to touch it, it always by brother or my ada who taking care the vegetables in the garden. They have mustard, peanut, and cabbage last year. I don't know what they have now. Have you tried to grow carrot or sweet pottato?
1 person likes this
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
13 Mar 13
My family grew carrots many years ago when I was living in Oregon. I haven't seen anyone grow it in Southern California. I'm sorry to say I don't know anything about sweet potatoes, so will look up that vegetable. Thanks for posting.
1 person likes this
@jambi462 (4598)
• United States
13 Mar 13
Some of the easiest things to grow in your garden are beets, beans, salad greens, and carrots. I grew a lot of peppers and tomatoes in my garden last year so much so that a lot of the other things I grew didn't have much room for sunlight or to be able to get as much of it as they would have liked. This year I'm not sure I will be able to garden because I'm planning on moving towards the end of the summer in late august which won't allow me to be able to harvest most things. It's a pretty big bummer because I've been making a lot of progress over the last couple of years in what I've been able to grow and last year I grew most of my stuff from seed and then transplanted it on my own.
1 person likes this
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
13 Mar 13
Several people have suggested I grow seed, as I'm located in Southern California where there is a good year round growing season. Last year I was harvesting tomatoes in December, which doesn't happen in most of the United States. I'm going to consider beets, as haven't grown them in years. Thanks for the reply.
@nyssa102 (749)
• United States
25 Mar 13
What I am going to say may sound rather strange. But I always felt that people had a certain connection to some crops more than others, perhaps an energy thing. For example, I was never good with berries, but melons and tomatoes and beans really responded to me Melons really worked out well. For some reason, I just look at a melon seed and it just pops, LOL. There is a trick, there if you plant in rows, you leave a little 'ditch' between the rows, and pour miracle grow in that irrigation ditch. You could probably just soak the entire garden with it, but for some reason, I always got better results with making little irrigation ditches inbetween the rows and filling it with miracle grow. Also, chicken poop if you can get it. Really works well :)
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
26 Mar 13
My area has lots of ditches and it does work well in California. I'm thinking about growing melons this year, as clearly corn won't be planted again. The winds knocked the entire crop over last year. When my husband told me all the corn was on the ground last year, I thought it was April Fool's Day and I have been fooled by him in the past. I was so shocked to see the plants on the ground and staking helped only a small amount. Its the first time I have seen such a sight and one of my neighbors looked over the fence and she couldn't believe the plants weren't standing. No question about it certain crops just shouldn't be grown in my area. I'll admit its one of the few vegetables I don't see here. Its costly in the store. Thanks for posting.
@kimbers867 (2541)
• United States
14 Mar 13
Good luck with your blueberries! We have never had luck here in Maryland with ours. Guess it is the PH levels in the dirt. We have great luck with every thing else (strawberries, tomato's, cukes, zuchinni, blackberries). We are very fortunate that whatever my husband touches does very well.
@Fishmomma (11524)
• United States
26 Mar 13
I'm glad to hear your husband does great gardening. There is always something that doesn't do well and last year it was corn for me. I couldn't keep the plants upright because of strong winds. Thanks for posting.
@mariaperalta (19096)
• Mexico
30 Mar 13
We do the same here in Mexico. We plant carrots, and chili peppers here. Im going to also plant bell peppers this year. As they grow fast.