I'd Rather Pay More Than Support Slave Labour.

Canada
April 27, 2013 10:33pm CST
I don't know if this story hit the USA, but it would not surprise me if it did. A factory in Bangladesh collapsed the other day. What hits home about this particular incident, even though it's only one of many that have occurred there in recent years, even in recent months, is that these particular factory workers made clothes for Canadian Company Joe Fresh, affiliated with Loblaws, and who's commercials I have often seen on television. I have never bought this line of clothing before, and believe me, after this incident, I never ever will!!! When asked, a spokeperson for Joe Fresh said that they had standards for the company, and it's workers, but were not in charge of the buildings in which they worked. Now, come on!! What kind of an excuse is that, and what's more, why is this company doing so much business? Are we, in the "developed" world, so desparate for a bargain that we'd support slave labour? Do you try and boycott this kind of thing, or do you hear stories like this, and just go about your normal shopping habits? Personally, I'd rather pay more to make sure that the people who make the products I use are not exploited.
4 people like this
9 responses
@SpitFire179 (2536)
• Canada
28 Apr 13
I must say that to say slave labour and exploitation in this day and age is less than an informed opinion. In those countries, in which I know many who have come here from those countries, it's not slave labour as we call it, but rather their way of life. Their minimum wage and so on. Here minimum wage is terrible for the cost of living. One can not afford to survive on it without a minimum of 2 other roommates in a city. We don't classify this as slave labour or exploitation- except in frustration for our circumstance. So why would we take their countries and make it out that way? Each place has jobs like this on earth. I find it more honourable to support the companies so that these low salary workers have a means to feed their families than paint them all a color of distaste among many and refuse to do business with them causing mass job loss for the people who truly need it to a point they would work for those low wages in the order place.
• Canada
28 Apr 13
First place*
@CatsandDogs (13964)
• United States
29 Apr 13
Oh I couldn't agree more! Slave labor, child labor, or any kind of unethical labor isn't my cup of tea. If I ever find out that something I buy is of this or anything close to something just as bad, I'll scream to the world so that the product would be boycotted even if the situation was corrected still, if it could happen once, who's to say it wouldn't happen again. Nope. I'd be done.
@ladym33 (11008)
• United States
28 Apr 13
Is this the story about the building collapsing? I heard that was because they have no building standards there, and they don't have to have proper permits or properly trained labor or anything to put up buildings there. Anyone can put up a building apparently and no one checks to see if the building is up to code and safety standards, if there even is any safety standards there.
@BarBaraPrz (20553)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
28 Apr 13
I rarely buy clothes but when I do, I don't buy them at grocery stores. Usually, it's Value Village or Salvation Army.
@usarrr (10)
• Austria
28 Apr 13
I would too, pay more for products produced in fair conditions. However, companies should also "gain less"... As an example Apple (also other companies, but I have data about Apple): You all know, how much they charge for an iPhone. The production, including material, personnel, production in China, etc. costs them roughly 150 US-$. They gain another 100 bucks per iPhone from resellers for "allowing" them to sell their products... They have the money to stop the horrible treatment of workers (in China) ... but they don't do it... sad sad thing... :/
@dagami (1162)
• Rome, Italy
28 Apr 13
the minimum wage varies from country to country. the minimum daily wage in third world countries is earned in half of an hour by some laborers in rich countries. the cost of living varies and while some people in some places may earn more, they can hardly meet their expenses. this situation in bangladesh should not be condemned only for the low wages of the workers. had they been working in a more stable structure with good facilities, this wouldn't have happened. if the authorities regularly monitored the factories in the area and imposed safety rules and regulations, this would not have happened. so many IFs... bangladesh is known for its quality cotton that is why lots of world famous companies have their clothes made there. the high labor costs in their mother countries is also another reason. the companies save money and provide jobs to thousands if not millions of people in these countries. in my opinion, it is not the fault of these foreign companies. the owners of these factories in bangladesh gain millions from these contracts but they do not invest enough money on their buildings. they know that since their workers need their salaries in order to survive, they would still come to work even if the buildings where they work are about to collapse over their heads. and this is exactly what happened...
@Magz1989 (272)
• Philippines
28 Apr 13
What! that is very unhumane. I agree that I would rather pay more than endanger people lives. They must secure the working place of their workers for that's their obligation.
@Magz1989 (272)
• Philippines
28 Apr 13
What! that is very unhumane. I agree that I would rather pay more than endanger people lives. They must secure the working place of their workers for that's their obligation.
@ajithlal (14569)
• India
28 Apr 13
I think the slave labor has decreased from what it had been before. I wish that everyone gets enough pay and gets enough freedom in their life. I wish that the cost of living comes down.