How many expressions can we use in English to say "defecation" and "urination" in daily life? I'm going to teach my little boy at home...

@dennislv (134)
Shanghai, China
September 24, 2013 3:33am CST
How do you say that in spoken English and written English? I know "pee", "have a pee","pass water","poop" and else? Tell me, the more the better, many thanks.
2 responses
@owlwings (38088)
• Cambridge, England
24 Sep 13
NOTE: Not all of these are ones I'd teach children! Urination: (Nouns): Piss, pee, wee, wee-wee, piddle, widdle, little jobs (Verbs): Piss, pee, wee, wee-wee, piddle, widdle, make water, have a tinkle (Euphemisms and expressions - mostly adult use): Use/Go to the loo/toilet/restroom/bathroom/ladies/gents &c.; to powder one's nose (ladies only); to splash one's boots (men); to see a man about a dog; to be excused; visit the heads (nautical slang - the facilities were often located at the bow or 'head' of the boat) Defecation: (Nouns): Poo, sh!t, turd, cack, do's, doings, doo-doo(s) (usually with reference to an animal, as "dog's do's"), big jobs (Verbs): Poo, sh!t, go potty (American - can mean either function) (Euphemisms and expressions): Use/Go to the loo/toilet/restroom/bathroom/ladies/gents &c. (as above, but one is less likely to say anything at all if one expects to be away from the company for a longer time!); have/take a dump; have a mud-out Notes: * In England, the infant's 'protective garment' is called a "nappy" (short for 'napkin'); in America it is called a "diaper" (usually pronounced "die-per"). * In England, to "go potty" actually means 'to go mildly insane' or 'to become mentally deficient'. It is often used in a joking sense, especially when used by a person about themselves - "I must be going potty!" is quite a common expression when someone has done something stupid. In America, the usage "I must go potty" is equivalent to "I must go to the toilet/bathroom/ladies &c" and is probably more commonly heard from women, especially those with children, than from men. * The word 'loo' (a shortening of 'Waterloo', which, itself was a euphemism for 'Water Closet' or WC) is thought of as specifically British. Most Americans think it 'cute' and as British as red telephone boxes, double-decker buses and Big Ben but I believe that it is also used in Australia (where 'dunny' is also used but is not as 'polite'). * Language changes very fast. My mother would always refer to the small room specific to bodily functions as the 'lavatory' and the term 'loo' has only become acceptable and current since about the 1960's (though it actually dates to the 19th Century or early 20th Century, I believe). 'Lavatory' is now considered rather an old fashioned term. My mother considered 'toilet' and "WC" to be words used by the "lower classes" (she was a snob!) but 'toilet' is now considered slightly more polite and acceptable than 'loo'. Official notices tend to refer to the receptacle (and the room it is in) as the 'toilet'.
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@dennislv (134)
• Shanghai, China
25 Sep 13
Your explanation is really penetrating and profound. Thank you so much. "to be excused",as I quoted, how do people use it in a whole sentence?
@owlwings (38088)
• Cambridge, England
25 Sep 13
@dennislv "May I be excused?" is a euphemism mostly used in a school environment and, in this case, means "May I leave the class [to go to the toilet]?" In general, of course, to be excused from something means that your absence is understood and forgiven.
• Calgary, Alberta
25 Sep 13
There are ones that might be considered profanity so I wont mention them, but on the other hand, for pooping you can use "making a deposit" or "doing a bowel movement"
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