What are the essentials of a happy childhood?

@indexer (2070)
Leicester, England
October 18, 2015 5:20am CST
I suppose we would all say: "Being wanted and being loved" - but is that the whole story? Are there other factors that you would say are essential for childhood happiness, or are "wanted and loved" enough? And how do "wanted and loved" show themselves in practice? Is love defined as hugs and cuddles, lots of toys at Christmas, or something else? And how about the question of parenthood - can a child be happy in a single-parent family, or having two parents of the same sex?
14 people like this
19 responses
@LadyDuck (182041)
• Switzerland
18 Oct 15
I do not believe that a child can make the difference. I think that children who grow in a home where they feel love, they have friends and support can be happy even with only one parent or parents of the same gender. I know many children who have two parents who fight every day and this is surely bad for them.
7 people like this
@artemeis (4070)
• China
18 Oct 15
Oh you'll be surprised how a child can pick things up and after at a young tender age.
2 people like this
@dodoazo (21586)
• Philippines
18 Oct 15
Well to put categorically, an essentials for a happy childhood, no pressure; the child gets what he wants. There is peace among his parents, siblings, and surrounding living within theirs. However, there is no perfect happiness and there is no either perfect happy childhood. Happy childhood is so limited, but it could be the origin of adult happiness in the later life.
5 people like this
@Lushlala (939)
• Gaborone, Botswana
18 Oct 15
I totally agree with you, @Anna :)
1 person likes this
@Juliaacv (34150)
• Canada
18 Oct 15
I don't think that a parent's gender can make or break their ability to be a loving parent. In my eyes a loving parent gives to their child from the heart and in their best interests not necessarily material goods, but praise and teaching them how to grow into a good person who will get along in society. When I worked full time I would give our son lots of toys, when I went to part time, I gave him lots of time, today, as an adult, he remembers the time that I gave to him and spent with him. And I do remember being happier as a parent then.
5 people like this
@Lushlala (939)
• Gaborone, Botswana
18 Oct 15
@Juliaacv This so true!
• Budennovsk, Russian Federation
18 Oct 15
Parents' attention! Parents' bringing up. Also parents' background is important. As for the departure from the norm "Male +Female" it threatens to breach of child's development for sure.
3 people like this
@BelleStarr (39724)
• United States
18 Oct 15
If a child is loved, given positive reinforcement and taught to be a productive member of society, I don't think it matters what the actual parent or parents makeup is.
3 people like this
• United States
18 Oct 15
I think a routine is vital and some structure is needed. Also stability. These things can make or break. I feel that love is important, but without the other factors I mentioned, it can lead to great difficulties in adult life.
2 people like this
@Lushlala (939)
• Gaborone, Botswana
18 Oct 15
@TiarasOceanView I couldn't agree more with you! I left out routine, structure and stability in my post, but they are absolutely essential in raising a child. I have a friend who lets her 9 year old son run rings around her; she doesn't set him boundaries, he issues commands etc and I fear she's creating a very scary monster. When you think how unforgiving the world out there is, I fear for this boy's future, trying to survive in later years as a young man!
2 people like this
• United States
18 Oct 15
@Lushlala I can relate to that..he will come up against someone in his life that will not bow to his commands.
1 person likes this
@Lushlala (939)
• Gaborone, Botswana
18 Oct 15
@TiarasOceanView It's really sad to watch. What's more, my friend has told us that how she raises her child is not up for discussion. He's 9 and is such a cry baby, always wanting to get his own way.
1 person likes this
@dodoazo (21586)
• Philippines
18 Oct 15
A happy child belongs to a happy family wherein the mother, the father and his siblings are happy. And they all live in a happy community. Everything is all happy.
@artemeis (4070)
• China
18 Oct 15
Community and environment may not be conducive like Syria or Haiti but if parents could make their all to bring up and protect the child, that I believe is already the first step and utmost unconditional love. It is what the adults do for and to the child that counts whether the environment is challenging or normal.
1 person likes this
@pahak627 (4198)
• Philippines
18 Oct 15
I guess it depends upon the person. For me, I can not say that I had a happy childhood but I was contented with what I had at that time. I would not exchange it to another cause I love my parents and my siblings.
2 people like this
@dodoazo (21586)
• Philippines
18 Oct 15
Happiness is relative. Why I said that? A person who is laughing outside but crying in the inside is the kind of happiness what I am talking about.
@artemeis (4070)
• China
18 Oct 15
I firmly believed that a child should always feel loved and that means that adult parents have all the responsibility to ensure it by being around during their early childhood, tending to their needs, teaching them, play with them and most of all be an exemplary example to take upon on themselves. It is important to be able to do and fulfill as much as what you have mentioned here. There's no excuse since it is decided to bring them into this world. So parents should be prepared to sacrifice and make every effort here to bring up the child lovingly. As for single parenthood, I am never a supporter for such parenthood because it is very challenging and if one is not careful and considerate enough, the child could suffer immeasurable trauma and setbacks when there are many issues that are present in their surrounding circle of peers like where is their other half of the parent, how and who is responsible for their existence and so on.
2 people like this
@skysnap (18040)
18 Oct 15
we can't control the place where we are born. so it's hard to say. we can to some extent control where we are going. that's how the life is i guess.
1 person likes this
@dodoazo (21586)
• Philippines
18 Oct 15
The happiness that we want to achieve is too dependent from our own way of living and also in our own behavior and attitude. If we have a positive attitude of doing things surely we could get what we want to, that is, the happiness of being obedient and well-mannered traits.
2 people like this
@Susan2015 (21939)
• United States
18 Oct 15
To feel safe and in a happy home. Not a home where you get everything you want, that doesn't make for a happy home. Feeling secure and paid attention to and knowing there are people there to protect you are what is most important. Not material things.
1 person likes this
@bookbar (1612)
• Sudbury, England
18 Oct 15
Unfortunately, ours was not a loving home, but I do know several single parent/same sexparent families, that do have very stable and much loved kids, and they do appear to find time to afford their offspring much quality time, often more so than the accepted family unit.
1 person likes this
30 Dec 15
love in a happy home
@mythociate (15963)
• Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
2 Dec 15
I'm not sure I can claim to know (only in my mid-thirties here), but I think it's "continuity from childhood to adulthood to parenthood etc." In America, it seems like everything one does is done 'so that one can do something else in the future' (going to high-school so that one can go to college so that one can get a high-paying job so that one can support one's children as they do the same).
• Fuzhou, China
19 Oct 15
Parents are always side, this shall be essential factor!
• Kollam, India
19 Oct 15
Children should be loved and cared a lot. From the school days itself they should be practiced hard work, then only they can succeed in work. If they are allowed to enjoy a lot, they will be more repelled from hard work. But we should always love them a lot.
• Indonesia
19 Oct 15
I think children need so much attention and affection from adult and people around them. I'm not sure about the same gender. As long as children feel appreciated, loved and we give them space to grow and fun, they will feel the meaning of joy
@wiLLmaH (8241)
• Singapore, Singapore
19 Oct 15
Spends quality time with them.
@Freelanzer (9498)
• Canada
18 Oct 15
Love, acceptance and discipline are essential. I think that love pretty much covers everything. If you love your child, you would not harm them or ridicule them or allow them to do whatever they want. Support, freedom and structure are also important
@rhpinc (1416)
• Las Vegas, Nevada
18 Oct 15
It is being treated like a living soul and not a dying life. It is caring for everyone in the family and friend group, and thus happen in return the bright smily face you gave to. It is about teaching not preaching. Living by an example...