Finally some sanity

@artemeis (3950)
China
August 26, 2016 11:04pm CST
I don't know if you've read my earlier post on how the French authorities - law enforcement had gone over excessive on Muslim womenfolks by asking them to remove their Burkini on their beach in Nice in view of the recent spate of terrorist attacks in France. And it really went out of control with the lawmakers - court ruling a ban on it without due consideration of the religious requirements and practices. Even the ex-president was involved siding anti-religiously. But the High Court in France has overturned the ban - one cannot tell women what to wear. I think national security can still be in tact if everyone does their part, to fight against terrorism. Going after innocent Muslim women's clothing just isn't going to solve their inadequate and complacent security procedures and protocols. Ref: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3759938/France-s-administrative-court-overturns-burkini-ban.html
I can understand that the French are rather tensed after being targeted by the terrorists lately. But, I have to give their law enforcement's the thumbs down...
8 people like this
8 responses
@LadyDuck (69661)
• Switzerland
27 Aug
There is a lot of talking about this problem right now here in Europe. In public pools they are not allowed here in Switzerland for a problem of hygiene. Even if they shower before entering the water, the heavy fabric remain full of germs. This is a sufficient reason to ban them here, exactly as you are not allowed to enter a pool "fully dressed".
2 people like this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
29 Aug
I can understand the hygiene point of view but I don't think the womenfolks would be unaware. Also, I believe I saw them in a wet suit similar to those used for diving before and the pool does not have any issues with that.
2 people like this
@LadyDuck (69661)
• Switzerland
29 Aug
@artemeis The diving suits are not allowed in the pool area here. You can dive in the lake, but not in a pool.
1 person likes this
@just4him (56419)
• Green Bay, Wisconsin
10 Oct
I can understand why they did it. Glad they overturned it.
2 people like this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
17 Oct
I don't think the issue was addressed wholly and properly. In fact, it had sort of spread to other European countries to refuse the Muslim women from wearing their Burkini be it on the open beach or indoor swimming pools.
2 people like this
• Preston, England
17 Oct
good that such an impractical ban has been lifted
1 person likes this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
17 Oct
I believe this ban is still being enforced and that the Muslim women in Nice will still need to remove their burkhinis.
@CoolPeace (1636)
• Miami, Florida
17 Oct
They could find a better way to check for safety.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
17 Oct
Unfortunately, they aren't doing it. Call it incapable or plain lazy at the expense of these believers.
1 person likes this
@advokatku (4041)
• Indonesia
29 Aug
I follow the news of the ban Burkini, and I think the French have turned into a secular state. It certainly forms a denial of the republican system that exalts the freedom of the people's voice.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
29 Aug
The basic right for one to freely practice religion must never be interrupted. In my opinion, the French authorities are taking up a notch on a personal basis and it is not right for them to impose such a ban tyrannically.
@lealuvy2j (1666)
• Philippines
27 Aug
I agree. The government should not tell women what to wear especially if the reason is because of their religion. There is such a thing called religious freedom. As long as it is not hurting anyone, why ban it? I also feel as though banning the Burkini would promote divisiveness which in turn can level up to terrorism. We should make Muslims feel that they are human beings like us and we should include them and not treat them indifferently so that they would not be left out and turn to terrorism.
@artemeis (3950)
• China
29 Aug
Authorities should not impose without due to considerations to people's rights and religion. I don't understand how the lawmakers in France could just implement such a law to ban so instantaneously and stir up the sentiments of their minority's community.
@vandana7 (49740)
• India
22 Sep
Telling grown ups what to do, and what not to do, especially if they are accustomed to behaving in particular way always causes resentment. But appealing to their logical senses would help.
@artemeis (3950)
• China
22 Sep
I think the authorities were going overboard to the point of paranoid. It is a known fact women of the Muslim faith could not reveal their appearances in the full sight of the public. The lawmakers can make a mandatory check to ensure safety and prevent an attack. There are many ways to ensure public safety and thwart an attack other than forcefully banning.
1 person likes this
@vandana7 (49740)
• India
22 Sep
@artemeis ... I would appeal...in the past, terrorism was not such an issue. Now it is. There is no compulsion. But those who can shed that garment, would reduce checking work, and thereby help us. It is just an appeal. Nothing mandatory. You are welcome to decide if you are willing to help us or not.
1 person likes this
@artemeis (3950)
• China
25 Sep
@vandana7 If I were to help, I would appeal to the Muslims to abolish the law to have their women all covered up. I felt that their religion should begin to be more practical for their womenfolks. In this case, they (women) will never have to buy another "Burkina" but more "bikinis" !!
1 person likes this
@jstory07 (39421)
• Roseburg, Oregon
20 Oct
That was good that it was oveturned. They were just being careful