Cutting Up a Whole Chicken @ $1.00 a pound

United States
February 28, 2017 1:13pm CST
When I was young and we were pretty poor, I bought whole chickens at a cheaper price and learned to cut them up myself. I used to do them one at a time and it was a bit messy. I didn't particularly like cutting them up but I really disliked cleaning up the mess. Now, if I still had my family at home, I would buy three whole chickens and do them all at once. Not only would I have a complete meal for each set of parts (everyone getting a drumstick for example ) but you can choose what ever parts you want for any meal. There is also a bonus... the cleanup only has to be done once. It's great to only pay $1.00 a lb for chicken breast, which is a current price in my supermarket for a whole chicken. It only takes a few minutes to cut a whole chicken and of course there is a youTube video to show you how if you don't already know. You can de-bone it if you like, remove all skin or prepare it anyway you like all at $1.00 a lb. I wrap each piece in good thick cellophane, leaving no air and it will keep in your freezer for several months. I prefer to leave it on the bone and I like to bake it with the skin. There is so much more flavor that way. The best part is you can make chicken soup from the backbone! Just cover with water, add salt, pepper, garlic, onion (and any veggies you like) bring to a boil and simmer for an hour or so. Strain. Pick off the meat, add it to the broth with boiled noodles. Another meal with a throwaway piece. Stop throwing money away buying it already cut up! Here is your video showing how to cut one up:
Not only do you save money by cutting up a whole chicken yourself, but you also get the backbone to make stock. Melissa Clark demonstrates how. Subscribe on ...
11 people like this
10 responses
@jaboUK (55053)
• United Kingdom
2 Mar 17
I always buy whole chickens and cook them that way. Then I carve them up once they are cooked.
2 people like this
@jaboUK (55053)
• United Kingdom
2 Mar 17
@Jeanniemaries Seeing your post earlier made me crave for chicken, so that's what we had tonight. I bought one where you roast it in the bag it comes in, I've not tried it that way before. It was deliciously tender, and really easy to carve.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Mar 17
@jaboUK And no clean up!! I don't usually fix them in the bag, but they are very good when roasted that way.
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48224)
• Manchester, England
28 Feb 17
I have bought several whole chickens over the years, but still have difficulty carving them.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 17
I had help learning because my brother in law was a butcher. But the youTube video is good. (and pretty short)
1 person likes this
@Asylum (48224)
• Manchester, England
28 Feb 17
@Jeanniemaries I probably throw away a great deal because it becomes problematic very soon.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Mar 17
@Asylum The freezer is your best friend when cooking for one.
1 person likes this
@Platespinner (17062)
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
28 Feb 17
We've raised our own birds for meat a couple of times. My husband has done the executing, eviscerating and plucking, my job was to cut them up into pieces and vacuum pack them for the freezer. We might hatch a batch of chicks in late summer and raise them with the intention of popping them in the freezer.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Mar 17
Best way to feed your family, your own chickens, free range and antibiotic free, feeding the chicks as you choose. Your kids are very lucky!
1 person likes this
• Winston Salem, North Carolina
1 Mar 17
@Jeanniemaries even free range and antibiotic free the Cornish X meat birds are a little disturbing. All they do is eat and sit around eating some more. Unlike normal chickens they are big enough to butcher by the time they are 6 weeks old--we've dubbed them frankenchickens.
• United States
10 Mar 17
@Platespinner That's quite a short lifespan!
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39652)
• United States
1 Mar 17
lol I am too lazy I am afraid, when I guy a whole chicken, I roast it.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Mar 17
That's good also, Carving it up after roasting is about the same.
1 person likes this
@BelleStarr (39652)
• United States
2 Mar 17
@Jeanniemaries and it works so well for us, Al likes that dark meat and I like white, no waste there lol
• United States
10 Mar 17
@BelleStarr Perfect!!
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134917)
• Bunbury, Australia
28 Feb 17
This is a good idea and I always like the idea of only one clean-up.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Mar 17
I don't know why I didn't think of it years earlier.
1 person likes this
@JudyEv (134917)
• Bunbury, Australia
1 Mar 17
@Jeanniemaries The few times I bake I often do double lots and freeze one. Again it saves a lot of time and dishes.
• United States
10 Mar 17
@JudyEv I've had to learn that and it's so nice to have those ready made meals in the freezer.
1 person likes this
@1creekgirl (11947)
• United States
28 Feb 17
I'm afraid it's too late for me, lol. I tried for years to cut up chickens, and at the meal, no one could recognize which piece they had!
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 17
Oh, dear! That could be an issue! Did you check out the video? It's pretty short.
1 person likes this
@1creekgirl (11947)
• United States
28 Feb 17
@Jeanniemaries Not yet, I admit I'm a little spoiled. Even already cut up, I don't actually fry very good chicken.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Mar 17
@1creekgirl My mother made the best fried chicken in her cast iron frying pan when I was growing up, but I never did fry it well, so baked chicken became my signature dish. It's so easy and very good. It's easy to bake a potato right along with it as they take about the same time to cook.
1 person likes this
• Prairieville, Louisiana
28 Feb 17
$1 per pound is such a good deal for chicken.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 17
This week drumsticks and thighs are $.99 a lb.
@DianneN (84977)
• United States
28 Feb 17
Cutting up chickens is an acquired art. I've learned how do do it properly over the years. Unfortunately, the price of free range and organic chickens isn't as low as yours. Enjoy!
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 17
Yes, I stopped buying free range when I heard they consider it free range even if packed into the area tightly. Organic is probably better but for large families, probably not practical. Up in Ohio I have a great place to get real honest to goodness free range chickens and turkeys from Amish people I know.
2 people like this
@lokisdad (4264)
• United States
28 Feb 17
We do this at my house too. We buy the pork shoulder and I slice it up into chops and whatever else we want. Where we live chicken is not $1.00 LB wish it was. We don't eat as much chicken as we used to but when we do get some its mostly used for pot pies and sometimes we will have it baked or fried. I think one of the bigger dilemmas here is bone in or out. If you buy bone in you get the meat for cheaper. If you do buy boneless you pay more. We buy bone in and we let the dog have the pork bones. As you said the bones allow you to get more flavor out of the meat in my opinion but many people see it as pointless because you can't eat it so why pay for it if you are just going to throw it away anyway. We hardly ever waste anything.
1 person likes this
• United States
28 Feb 17
When you buy a whole chicken it's so much cheaper than cut up that the fact that bones are there isn't really an issue. It's not always $1.00 a lb but right now that is what I paid last week.
@Tampa_girl7 (26198)
• United States
9 Mar 17
I really hate cutting a chicken up, but you are right , it really saves.
• United States
10 Mar 17
It is a significant savings, so worth the trouble.