Disabled View

United States
December 9, 2006 4:14pm CST
How would you feel if you couldn’t get up stairs so you couldn’t go to a new restaurant? How would you feel if people were staring at you while you shop? What if you couldn’t even go over your friends’ home because there was stairs but no elevator? What if people assume things about you? Like you’re dumb? Or they can catch it? Whatever it is. Maybe they just won’t take time to see you are more than your disability or whatever it is. Imagine how you would feel. Well, I don’t have to imagine. People with disabilities really are not that different. We need the same basic things: food, clothes, love, shelter, etc. You need this too, right? We generally don’t even look that different. Can’t you see past a wheelchair, crutches, a walker, etc? It should not be that hard. We need some different things. And we are more limited. Before you judge us try to see things from our view. Think about this. While you think take a small glimpse into my world. I have had Rheumatoid Arthritis since I was 5 years old. I use crutches and a wheelchair. I cannot walk for or long. The arthritis attacks all my joints so I am extremely limited. Many things I cannot do on my own and need help. I am in constant pain. My only break is sleep. Even then sometimes pain follows me. But I have decided as long as I can take it I’m not taking pain medicine. I don’t want to deal with side effects. And insurance may not cover it anyway. But in many ways I’m the same as everyone else. I love movies and hanging out. As far as music, I like a little bit of everything but I’d say my favorite types are pop and rock. I’m hooked on my TV shows. For movies, the only things I’m sure to say no to are movies that scare me (I’m chicken), too much blood or gore, and sub titles (I don’t want to read my movie). Other than that I like whatever my instincts go for. I love art, photography, and animals. Dogs being my favorite. Followed by wolves, dolphins, and whales. Thank you for taking the time to go through this. This is a very small look into my life but I wanted to share it with you. My body may be disabled or have disabilities (whatever is politically correct) but my mind is not. I’m not a genius or anything but my mind is fine. After this I hope you’ll take the time to see we are more than our abilities or disabilities. We are people. Different and the Same.
30 responses
@lissaj (532)
• United States
10 Dec 06
It's a shame how people are so quick to judge anyone who is different. One of my best friends is in a wheelchair and she has the same problems. She is one of the sweetest, kindest women I know. It took her a long time, but she has learned to be proud of who she is and what she has accomplished in life. She just tries to ignore idiots like that. I know it still hurts her feelings, but she knows who she is and is proud of that. No one can take those feelings away from you. You sound like a very sweet, caring, fun person. Hopefully more people will be able to see past the wheelchair to the person inside it.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 06
All I can say is AMEN! You put my feelings quite eloquently. I, too, am disabled and I get so tired of being treated like a freak. See me not my wheelchair. Don't fear me because of my disability. Ask me questions if you want to. I'll answer them. Let me get into the same places as those who walk. Mainly treat me as a human!
1 person likes this
@lissaj (532)
• United States
12 Dec 06
What everyone tends to forget is that people with disabilities are still people who have feelings. They are like everyone else, except they have some physical limitations. I think a lot of the problem is people don't know how to act. They can't get past the disability, and that isn't fair.
1 person likes this
• India
10 Dec 06
thanks for sharing ur views.my dad went through an accident and for a year he was immobile and went through what u have been going thro.i can understand ur feeling.from then i see nobody differently.make me ur friend.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 06
I would love to have you as a friend.
• United States
10 Dec 06
I can understand where you are coming from but have you ever thought of the other ppl who are disabled yet dont show it and how they are discriminated against?? and how people talk about them at least you have somithing like a wheelchair or crutchs to show ppl somithing is wrong with you, for me most pppl just think im lazy and a desprate house wife looking for a leagal high with pills even my own doctor, but that dont change the pain i have, lol and hey at least you get sleep i am lucky to get 4 hours a night:P but im a night owl anyway so its no biggie, in fact i do my best to make sure ppl dont think of me as being disabled im always happy to hear ppl be shocked to find out my med conditions cause i dont act disabled and such even tho god knows it hurts and i feel like crap, that dont change the fact that i have 4 kids and a husband that need me and the house isnt gonna clean itself ya know LOL yea my hubby does help alot we are both neat freeks and there are days and even weeks when he has to clean before work and come home and still help clean but thats what he signed up for ya know;) im not trying to one up your pain ya know just giving you a different perspective ~M~
• United States
10 Dec 06
Actually I barely sleep but I'm glad to hear your different perspective. I have thought of people that aren't visablly disabled. When I was really young someone thought I was a brat because I was crying in pain. I had the arthritis at that point but didn't need crutches or a wheelchair yet.
• United States
10 Dec 06
What if you had never heard your mate's voice? What if you could no longer enjoy your favorite music? What if you could not just pick up the phone and talk to a friend? What if people thought you were dumb because you are deaf? That's me.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 06
Good points!
@ESKARENA1 (18299)
10 Dec 06
i dont have the advantages of a visable disability. I have partial sight and dyslexia, so i dont try hard enough am lazy and should just pull myself together, ppl are so shallow and stupid
1 person likes this
@Ohara_1983 (4120)
• Kuwait
10 Dec 06
thank's for sharing your view:) by the way i have a brother, he is also a disable but the diff. is, he is not using a wheelchair. his right hand cut the doctor becuase of the wounds going to cancer so we don't have a choice and also for the life of my brother. now his ok and he accept what happen to him and we admit that they a people are have an idiotic,stupid mind. but i always advice to my brother don't mind them because they are are a stupid. and look at you i told him, you have a one hand but you have now business? how about them? they have? they are a complete but they are lazy to find a job for their family? that i always say to my brtother and thank God because he is not loosing his hope and faith to God. although you have a affliction,but in the eyes of God we are the same and we are one. God bless and more power:)
• United States
10 Dec 06
I'm sorry about your condition. I can't imagine having a chronic condition like that. I have lots of chronic pain but I doubt it is anywhere near what you go through. Makes me feel small for whining once in awhile about my back. I try not to stare when I see disabled people but I am usually fascinated by their wheel chairs or some other aspect of them. I know many disabled people say they would rather a person just come up and ask about it instead of stare but I am way too shy for that. I really would love to find out how they cope with daily life and how they get things done. I find it very interesting. I don't mean to be rude but like I said I am really shy. I have also taught (or try to teach) my kids that it is very rude to stare and point. But they are kids. I am always so embarrassed when they say stuff about people they see (disabled or not).
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 06
I think alot of it starts in the home, with what kind of manners and teachings people raise their children with. It is natural for small children to look at disabled or handicapped people and stare. They are curious and they don't know any better until they are taught. The parents need to teach children that it is not nice manners to stare, and that we are ALL EQUAL just not everyone looks exactly the same.
1 person likes this
@epizzahut (2079)
• China
10 Dec 06
I am glad to read you posting and learn alot.I do believe in you are normal,and you can overcome the illness,all the best,pray your happiness!!
• Canada
10 Dec 06
I have so much more to say regarding your post, but I'd rather myLot-mail it, so I've requested you as a friend. Really, you might be interested in what I have to say! :)
1 person likes this
@misskatonic (3726)
• United States
10 Dec 06
I know how you feel. It's taken me years to ignore people looking at me oddly, to stop assuming every person laughing is laughing at me and all the rest. I have a lot of medical problems and I get around either in a chair or with the help of a cane. I hate how people are judged on our bodies - I may have trouble getting around, but there's nothing wrong with my mind. I'm a normal person - I just go to the doctors a bit more and need a little help getting around, that's all. Thank you for this post. I actually write articles on different aspects of disabled life, over on Associated Content. I'm Faye Donahue over there, there's a link in my profile. I'd love it if you checked out the one I've got running now!
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Dec 06
I can understand what you go through. My little brother who is now deceased, was severely handicapped. People outright poked fun at him and pointed their finger and laughed at him. It makes me so upset to even think about it. But I found too that there are people who have much compassion for people who have disabilities and treat them as a normal human. This week I just injured my back. Temporarily I need a cane to walk because of the excruciating pain I'm going through. Just today, on the way to the grocery store, I noticed people downright stared at me like I was an alien while others looked at me with compassion. You are a strong person to put up with all of the people's attitudes and it has made you all the more wiser. I am truly sorry that you have to go through this pain that you deal with every day. I hope soon they will find a cure for your ailment and that you never have to go through the pain and anguish again.
• India
10 Dec 06
Well my dear friend, you have put it in a very candid and truest way, you are differently abled and you are unique in your own way ( When God shuts the door on one side, he opens two more doors for us! ). There are many things which we cannot do. The people who are really diabled are those who don't work and say "It's not possible" even before trying! These are, you aren't! I can understand how insensitive people can be. It's high time they understand the fact that you are on equal terms with them inspite of these impediments. As for your condition, I'm really sorry for the fact that you had to live with it ever since the age of 5. I'm with you, my dear friend. Good day to you, bye.
@rakinitin (686)
• Canada
10 Dec 06
Oh man, too true. My ex woke up one day and he suddenly had MS. He began to have seizures/episodes (for lack of a better word) and one of them caused him to go crippled for several weeks. While he was in the hospital (2 weeks), he quickly noticed how people's attitudes were so different towards him now that he was in a wheelchair. Frankly, I was sickened by how cruel, rude and mean people can be.
@Kylalynn (1773)
• South Africa
9 Dec 06
Yes you are normal. They are supposed to making building entrances with ramps for wheelchairs, but I still see many places have not yet started let alone completed. I once saw a lady in a wheelchair buying material. She looked really lovely. I realised later that she had kept her confidence, she was sitting up straight and talking nicely. I am not sure which of joints have been affected by rheumatoid arthiritis, but perhaps you are able to try this. I hope people treat you as the normal person you are. All the best & take care!
@gabs8513 (48712)
• United Kingdom
9 Dec 06
Well said I am not as bad as you as I am still able to walk and thst I was bullied out of my Job 2 years ago once my illness was confirmed 100% after going through Tests for 3 Years and not in work hours either Then trying to get a new Job was murder once they heard about my Illness they found excuses not to employ me I have worked all my adult Life even with 2 Kids Now People look at me when I have to stop because I can't breathe and when I park in disabled carparks I even got asked once Where I was disabled. I am only 45 and People asume that I am just lazy when I can't walk anymore they just look at me Just because it is not visible and I am only 45 does not mean I am not diabled does not mean I am lazy or anything like that But People judge to fast
1 person likes this
@kstanley7 (1172)
10 Dec 06
Michael you bring a very valid point with regards to this topic, Unfortunatly with some people they are not open hearted and are one sided, in my eyes these people think that they are something special, but nothing gives them the right to judge anyone else. If I am honest I actually admire anyone that has a difficulty because they have more to deal with, and its just tougher when it comes to buildings without lifts, or ramps.
• United States
11 Dec 06
Actually the name is Selena. Heal 4 Michael is just an ID. Yes, it is tougher. I usually don't go into buildings that don't have any way to get a wheelchair in.
@rockboy (79)
• India
10 Dec 06
what tye of disabled view
• United States
10 Dec 06
Dude, did you at all read the post? I think the 'view' was pretty well laid out in the post. Try reading a post before responding.
1 person likes this
@Pigglies (9339)
• United States
10 Jan 07
I have a few disabled friends. The interesting thing is though, while I am not one to point or stare at anyone, one of my friends who has permanent damage from chemo and radiation, was pointing at a girl who was bald and in a wheelchair at the mall! I was SO embarassed! She's all pointing and like, "Oh! I bet she had chemo... wow, she's got no hair." Basically like that girl shoudn't be allowed out to shop. Umm... okay! I'm not sure where she missed the connection, but as a kid she was on chemo and for awhile had to wear leg braces and got really mad and would cry as people pointed and stared at her. Just gave me a rather interesting point of view on this. I'd agree with you that disabled people aren't all that different from the rest of us. I have disabled friends and I really don't even think about that unless they are telling me something. I think the rest of us should just be thankful we do not live in pain and we should never laugh at or discriminate disabled people.
@paule4129 (968)
• United States
10 Jan 07
i would feel bad to be left out but it is discrimnation not to have access to any public place/i dont care if people stare they only satisfying curiosity not trying to hurt/im disabled and i have learned to accept and overcome and go places i thought i couldnt/one part of me may be handycapped but that only gives the rest of me more strength