A good sense of humour Americans best at it or British?

@deeeky (3669)
Edinburgh, Scotland
December 15, 2006 2:46pm CST
I think looking at most films that I have watched each one has a different type of humour. Whats your favourite?
5 people like this
18 responses
@emisle (3824)
• Ireland
15 Dec 06
irish humour is the best! though I'll go with British here because it's similar..:)
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
15 Dec 06
If I put two shovels against a wall which one would you pick?
@emisle (3824)
• Ireland
15 Dec 06
why would i need a shovel?!
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
15 Dec 06
lol. Just testing. You passed.
1 person likes this
@Darkwing (21590)
16 Dec 06
I prefer British humour. Sometimes, I find it difficult to understand American jokes, let alone laugh at them. :-) Of course, that might just be me, but I have a lot of favourite British Comedy Films/Shows that I like, including Mr. Bean (whom I think is hilarious) lol, Black Adder, Monty Python and the Holy Grail and the Life of Brian, to mention but a few. One American guy I do find funny at times, not all of his works, is Mel Brookes. I loved The Young Frankenstein and Blazing Saddles was quite funny. I like a good laugh!
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
16 Dec 06
Yes Mr Bean a definate one to laugh at.I think he is a modern Charlie Chaplin with some of the best expressions I have seen for a long time. The kind of comic that you can see in your mind even now just thinking about him now.
@Darkwing (21590)
16 Dec 06
Yes, I remember a Christmas one he made about eleven years ago, where he took the Christmas Tree from the Town Square and put it in his room. Then, he was stuffing the turkey and lost his watch inside the turkey. Ohhhhhhhh, I was crying with laughter.
@suedarr (2382)
• Canada
15 Dec 06
I prefer British comedys over American ones. My favourites being Monty Python and Black Adder.
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
15 Dec 06
Good ones! sometimes when I see them again I see something else funny because I was to busy laughing on the previous time lol
1 person likes this
@suedarr (2382)
• Canada
15 Dec 06
I'm the same way! LOL! I could watch them over and over!
• United States
26 Jan 07
I don't think one has a better sense of humor than the other. They're just different. Monty Python is a riot; so is Jon Stewart. They're just different.
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
27 Jan 07
Nice choices you made. I feel the same.
@lilaclady (28270)
• Australia
28 Dec 06
I would have to say the British, being Australian I think I identify with their humour more, I love their humour.
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
28 Dec 06
There are some good Australian ones to. I loved crocodile Dundee.
@emeraldisle (13158)
• United States
16 Dec 06
Both can be very good and I've also seen bad of both. Overall though I'm more familiar with American humor since I'm from the States. Now Canadian humor seems to combine both together I've noticed and can be very good. I think humor, like so many other things, diversity is a good thing.
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
16 Dec 06
That is a very good comment and I never thought of that as there are a lot of french speaking Canadians so the frech films could be an influence as well. Thanx
@megs85 (3145)
• Australia
15 Dec 06
I think British people have a very dry, reserved sense of humour wheras Americans are more boistorous, offensive and make stupid things look funny (ie; Jacka$$, Dude wheres my car, Dumb and Dumber, The Cable Guy, Billy Maddison, etc). In comparison I'd say Aussies have a very laid back sense of humour, can be sarcastic, can be dumb, can be witty, so I'm throwing another one into the mix, and thats my pick. GO AUSSIES GO! How about yourself?
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
15 Dec 06
Great! I thought Crocodile Dundee was a classic. A great story line lol
@lisan22 (191)
• United States
15 Dec 06
I'm American but I grew up watching British humor as my dad grew up watching it as well. I like both but I prefer British humor (a more dry humor). I've always been a huge fan of the Monty Python TV show and movies and I also really enjoy Sacha Baron Cohen.
@deeeky (3669)
• Edinburgh, Scotland
15 Dec 06
Does a dry humour mean that you can watch them without tears coming to your eyes watching the really funny bits?
@Bizziebod (3526)
7 Feb 07
I prefer the British sense of humour as opposed to the American, but I suppose it's only natural to think your own country's sense of humour is the best as thats what you have grown up with. Although the best comedy film I saw was American an that was Wayne's World, but you can't beat the good old British comedians like Peter Kay, Jo Brand and not forgetting 'Little Britain!'
@Bee1955 (3887)
• United States
29 Jan 07
Answering this is like adding apples and oranges.I love Eddie Brill, Are You Being Served, Monty Python and Benny Hill's humors and then again I love the Blue Collar Comedy Tours, Margaret Cho, the Colbert Report, and Lewis Black. I guess I have to say my favorite is depending on the subject matter.
@freesoul (3024)
• Egypt
29 Jan 07
It's really hard to tell, of course I like both and it depends on the movie in question but on the whole I may find British comedy more "classy" than American :)
@irisheyes (4375)
• United States
29 Jan 07
I always thought the British had a marvelous sense of humor and of the ridiculous BUT I recently posted about Charles & Camilla's visit to Phila and British Bashing. It was meant ot be tongue in cheek but a couple of the Brits were so thin skinned that I think I'm re-evaluating the humor situation. Americans took in on the chin here for weeks of bashing and came back with their sense of humor intact so I'll give it to the Yanks on this one! PS I only had a few resposnes to that posting and maybe it's not enough to really judge but I think I'll give the sense of humor award to the US anyway. We need a little pat on the back. It's been a bad couple years.
@weemam (13389)
28 Jan 07
Scottish is best and you would know that lol . was at the lang toon yesterday . nice to meet you xx
28 Jan 07
I find that the British sense of humour is quite weird and witty, wheras the American sense of humour tends to be quite corny (i'm thinking of Friends when I say this). I definately prefer the British sense of humour, not because I am British, but because I find that I can relate to it more. At the moment i'm really enjoying watching Little Britain and I also love the warped humour of the the League of Gentleman. I've heard that they're making an American version of The Office, i'd really like to see it to see if the humour differs at all from the British version.
@ppmblist (114)
• China
27 Jan 07
depends on every`s calture.some humour you think best but others not think so.a good humour maybe a foreigner can not understand,yes?
@yahooguy (508)
• Romania
27 Jan 07
americans...duh
@urbandekay (18314)
26 Jan 07
Generally, I like British humour, perhaps that is no surprise being a Brit, I like the anarchic, surreal and often silliness of it, which is rare in American humour in my subjective opinion. However, The Simpsons is most excellent, well done! all the best urban
@volschenkh (1045)
• South Africa
30 Dec 06
I like the dry British humour most, it gets under my skin! American slapstick can be good as well but it often becomes too farfetched for my taste.