Fusion Energy Via X-rays

Italy
December 17, 2006 12:14pm CST
If enough x-ray energy were packed into the relevant wave-length, (10^-8 meters lower end) nuclear fusion hypothetically becomes evident. The effective energy in focusing x-rays is the clue. The area of such small space reduces the amount of fuel being exposed to such energies, thus net output E is also reduced. It appears that when energy output reduces, containment needs appear to be reduced. My theory is to so reduce space volume containing fuel that output energy will be so small that one could shield it by using water as radiation shield. As should be well known, water is a very good radiation shield because of the closeness of water atoms. The water containing nuclear emissions at very low levels could directly serve as pulse damping media, and simultaniously serve as energy storage transfer media in the form of steam. When free energy becomes widely available, energy dictators will fall. The free in free energy says much!!! Directed x-ray energy as in beam emissions appear to be ideal for this application.
2 people like this
5 responses
@unisis (1674)
• Indonesia
18 Dec 06
refers to power generated by nuclear fusion reactions. In this kind of reaction, two light atomic nuclei fuse together to form a heavier nucleus and release energy. The largest current experiment, JET, has resulted in fusion power production slightly less than the power put into the plasma, maintaining an output of 16 MW for a few seconds. designed to produce several times more fusion power than the power into the plasma over many minutes, was announced. The D-T fuel cycle Diagram of the D-T reaction Enlarge Diagram of the D-T reaction The easiest (according to the Lawson criterion) and most immediately promising nuclear reaction to be used for fusion power is: D + T ? 4He + n Deuterium is a naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen and as such is universally available. The large mass ratio of the hydrogen isotopes makes the separation rather easy compared to the difficult uranium enrichment process. Tritium is also an isotope of hydrogen, but it occurs naturally in only negligible amounts due to its radioactive half-life of 12 years. Consequently, the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle requires the breeding of tritium from lithium using one of the following reactions: n + 6Li ? T + 4He n + 7Li ? T + 4He + n The reactant neutron is supplied by the D-T fusion reaction shown above, the one which also produces the useful energy. The reaction with 6Li is exothermic, providing a small energy gain for the reactor. The reaction with 7Li is endothermic but does not consume the neutron. At least some 7Li reactions are required to replace the neutrons lost by reactions with other elements. Most reactor designs use the naturally occurring mix of lithium isotopes.
@isha900 (1460)
• India
18 Dec 06
it can be right ans
@xtedaxcvg (3191)
• Philippines
6 Jan 07
So, in short, you're saying that this discovery can revolutionize our energy industry? How long before this comes out? I just hope this means cheaper and more abundant energy for everyone.
@utsadetti (4593)
• United States
25 Dec 06
it's something new for me.
@isha900 (1460)
• India
18 Dec 06
i dont know
• United States
18 Dec 06
that is very interesting, i would like to hear more about it