What causes Asthma?

@jasjon (252)
Philippines
December 19, 2006 11:56pm CST
Just what causes asthma remains something of a mystery. Unfortunately, this condition often goes undiagnosed and untreated, as many people don’t even know they’re asthma sufferers. It’s regularly confused with other bronchial infections and doesn’t always “present” in a straightforward way, making diagnosis difficult. But you are more likely to develop asthma if members of your family suffer from allergies, or have asthma themselves. It also appears to occur more regularly in people who are overweight. Sometimes asthma occurs in conjunction with other conditions including: * infection of the sinuses (sinusitis); * soft, round mucous-producing tissues that project into the nasal passages (nasal polyps) ; * reflux (back flow) of stomach contents into the tube that leads from the throat to the stomach (gastroesophageal reflux disease) ; * reactions to medications (aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs).
3 people like this
34 responses
24 Jan 07
Other things tht aggrivate it are like, dusat mites, and Damp, or a tumble dyer. but otherwise, most ppl grow out of it, but so far I havent
@clickerz (472)
• Philippines
22 Dec 06
I am asthmatic and have an allergy.I experience all the symptoms.I have frequent reflux,shortness of breating.
• United States
22 Dec 06
Your subject was "what causes asthma" so I will reply to that! My son is 3 and developed asthma when he was 2. We worked with specialists because we could not get his asthma under control. After 7 hard months, we finally discovered that he is sensitive to chemicals. With all asthma, there is a trigger. His trigger is chemicals. When I would clean, do dishes or laundry, or even light candles he would be horrible. Our doctor suggested that we switch everything in our house to natural products. We found a company that has been around for 21 years and switched our house over. He has been asthma attack free for 7 months now! I suggest talking to your doctor about your possible triggers! Asthma can be controlled if you know what to control!
@pr_milu (455)
• India
21 Dec 06
I really don't know..but seems sometime genetics too.
@arunk7319 (1282)
• India
21 Dec 06
One of the Main reason for asthma is dust. Secondly if the person who is now suffering from asthma might have suffered from severe cold problems during his infant / child ages. If he was not taken care in the early ages, its gets developed to asthma. Best way for asthma is to go for ayurvedic treatments which is very popular in India ( Kerala ).
@mforseth (169)
• United States
21 Dec 06
Genetics
@ellemayra (284)
• Indonesia
21 Dec 06
People with asthma experience shortness of breath, chest tightness, coughing and wheezing. These symptoms intensify during an asthma attack, which occurs when exposure to allergens or other stimuli further inflame the airways, leading to an inability to expel trapped air from the lungs. Most asthma attacks are mild, but even people with mild asthma can have a fatal attack. A person with asthma experiences inflammation of the bronchial tubes, even when symptoms are not present. This causes a narrowing of the airways and an increased sensitivity to allergens or other stimuli. Exposure to these triggers often produces symptoms such as coughing, wheezing and an inability to breathe normally (shortness of breath). Asthma primarily affects the bronchi, the large passageways that allow air to travel between the trachea (windpipe) and the lungs. The inner lining of these bronchial tubes is called the bronchial mucosa, and it houses two important contributors to asthma. The triggers responsible for exercise-induced asthma differ from person to person. Typically, though, it is most likely to occur during prolonged, intense exercise in a cool, dry environment. Allergens and pollutants inhaled during exercise often trigger symptoms. If pollen is known to trigger asthma in a person, then exercising on a grassy field is likely to put that individual at risk for an attack. Those exercising on a busy street might find that excess air pollution triggers symptoms. Recent studies have shown that air pollution can have a significant effect on a person's lungs. Specifically, research suggests that certain pollutants can trigger bronchoconstriction (tightening in the airways) in sensitive individuals, making it more difficult to breathe. Depending on the area, exercising outside may bring a person into contact with air pollutants and increase the chance of bronchoconstriction or an asthma attack. In addition, pollutants can trigger bronchospasm. They can also make a person more sensitive to another trigger that would not cause a reaction alone, or might cause a smaller reaction alone. In some individuals, it appears that foods eaten several hours prior to exercise can increase the likelihood of an attack. A condition called exercise-induced anaphylaxis tends to occur when a person eats certain foods, and subsequently exercises in hot, humid conditions. Intensity of exercise also may be a factor in triggering this condition. Foods that can provoke a life-threatening reaction include: Shrimp, Celery, Peanuts, Egg whites, Almonds, Bananas.
• United States
21 Dec 06
I have asthma sadly... I im around all kinds of second hand smoke. Plus were I live there are so many pollutants in the air and that's also not good for me.
@uvacerba (427)
• Italy
21 Dec 06
unfortunately from what I have been able to costatare it asthma is a fact data at present, for guilt of the pollution unfortunately a child on six of it suffers because subject since small to pollution from many types. .ciao
@gingerjo (170)
• United States
20 Dec 06
I have asthma and was misdiagnoised as a teen and know if I miss my inhaler or the change of season I have problems. Asthma makes running with my family hard for me.
• India
20 Dec 06
stop all the bad habbits, and start gyming.
• India
20 Dec 06
i think ... due to dust nd due to genes also... i guess...
@vipul20044 (5800)
• India
20 Dec 06
Another name for Asthma is the phrase reactive airway disease. It's basically a form of an allergic reaction in your lungs. Your lungs become sensitive to certain pollutants such as pollen, dander, or just random stuff in the air. When you're exposed to these pollutants again, a chain reaction goes off in your lungs which includes the release of chemicals like histamine, leukotrienes, and acetylcholine. These pretty much all act to close off your lungs which results in the shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing. The medications you take for asthma such as bronchodilators all help to reverse these effects, and steroids are very useful to prevent the inflammation
@amitavroy (4826)
• India
20 Dec 06
as far as i knw there is a pipe for our breathing adn that gets small when people are effected by asthama and so there is a very goo dcure done in south they make u swallo a live fish adn then itsd all over your problem gets solved and the pipe hole gets increased
@ais_nedla (163)
• United States
20 Dec 06
for most people, asthma is caused by allergens found in our environment such as pollen and dander. some people also get asthma while under stress such as the kid from the movie the signs. when he was help by the alien, he had asthma. he was under a lot of stress.
• India
20 Dec 06
its due to poor atmosphere, smoking....
@coolcager (497)
• Costa Rica
20 Dec 06
its being pass down from generation to generation. and cause by. alergy from dust, feathers and anything that can irritate the nose. Lack of exercies. your lungs is too weak. and medication that can irritate some parts of your lungs.
@ghost1380 (871)
• Philippines
20 Dec 06
its heriditary
@Sorathian (4331)
• Pakistan
20 Dec 06
Another name for Asthma is the phrase reactive airway disease. It's basically a form of an allergic reaction in your lungs. Your lungs become sensitive to certain pollutants such as pollen, dander, or just random stuff in the air. When you're exposed to these pollutants again, a chain reaction goes off in your lungs which includes the release of chemicals like histamine, leukotrienes, and acetylcholine. These pretty much all act to close off your lungs which results in the shortness of breath, and difficulty breathing. The medications you take for asthma such as bronchodilators all help to reverse these effects, and steroids are very useful to prevent the inflammation. If you're concerned that you have asthma or have further questions, please consult your physician.
• United States
20 Dec 06
asthma sucks! I've had it for over 40yrs, and my pediatrician told me I'd outgrow it. Doctors back when I was younger didn't really do the education that is done now. I have a pulmonologist now, I've had one for over 10 years. Anyone that suffers from a lung disease should have a pulmonologist, no question about it. Regular practioners shouldn't be trying to manage asthma with the patient on their own. I didn't find out what triggered some of my asthma attacks until I was in my 20's.